cameras
Expert Score
8.1

Fujifilm X-T10 Digital Camera Review

Old school design meets new school value.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
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By the Numbers

The Fujifilm X-T10 takes after its big brother, the X-T1 in many ways–some good and some bad. However, when it comes to producing images, it has what it takes to compete with the best in its class. It unfortunately hits speed bumps that Fujifilm has yet to overcome in video performance.

Color & White Balance

Fuji has become known for their film simulation color modes, which mimic the color produced by various films (way back when cavemen used that stuff). Breaking the consistency of previous Fuji cameras, the Pro Neg Hi color mode was the most accurate with a ∆C00 corrected mean of 2.22 and a saturation of 97.2%.

Fuji X-T10 Color Score
The Pro Negative Standard mode was the most accurate film simulation offered on the X-T10.

Usually Pro Neg Standard is the most accurate mode, but we observed it being undersaturated much more than on previous cameras as it landed at 87% with a ∆C00 uncorrected mean of 2.24. If you want to get more pop in your images, you can choose Standard or Soft to increase vibrance slightly–or even go all out with Vivid for the most color.

White balance was mostly pedestrian and even custom settings were a mixed bag. While using auto white balance, the camera performed well in daylight, but struggled with fluorescent and incandescent. Incandescent saw errors of upwards 1900 degrees Kelvin. Custom settings were improved greatly, but if you want ultimate control, shoot RAW and correct any errors in post-processing.

Sharpness

We shot the resolution tests on the same Fujifilm XF Zoom 18-55mm f/2.8-4 lens as the X-T1. Overall we saw around 2,200 line widths per picture height (lw/ph) at MTF 50, but this dropped to around 1,800 lw/ph at 55mm. This basically means that the lens is sharpest while at 18mm and gradually loses resolution as you progress toward 55mm.

FujiFilm X-T10 Sharpness Chart

Noise

The X-T10 has a base ISO range of 200-6400 and an expanded range of 100-51200. However, users only have access to the base ISO range while shooting RAW. Overall, we found that the X-T10 produces acceptable images up to the base ISO limit of 6400.

We generally use a noise threshold of about 2% for image quality. At which the image quality drops below a point that printing a standard 8x10 images is going to be noticeable. Without noise reduction on at all the base ISO (200) showed only 0.84% noise and topped out at 1.57% at ISO 6400.

FujiFilm X-T10 Rosie
As you can see above, the entire base ISO range is fair play without losing too much quality.

Activating noise reduction will make it possible to shoot into the extended ISO range (JPEG only), but the loss of quality isn't really worth it. Considering that the X-T10 can cover the entire standard ISO range without the noise reduction, we find it unnecessary to use at all.

Video

We were hoping that video on the X-T10 would be improved since the X-T1 performed at such an unimpressive level. However, we were disappointed when we saw the same issues that plagued the X-T1 show up as soon as we started rolling on the X-T10.

False color and nasty moiré are likely still issues brought on from the camera's unique X-Trans color filter and pixel binning algorithm. The result is a soft image and lackluster quality, much like previous Fuji models.

Video Grab Fuji X-T10
The video performance on the X-T10 is underwhelming to say the least.

In our standard bright light test, we measured 400 lw/ph horizontal and 350 lw/ph vertical. In low light, the X-T1 scored 300 lw/ph horizontal and 300 lw/ph vertical. The result in the low-light sensitivity test was a perfect encore to the X-T1, requiring 23 lux to create a picture at 50 IRE.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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