cameras
  • Best of Year 2013
  • Editors' Choice

Nikon D600 Digital Camera Review

Nikon's D600 is just a strong as the D800, minus the extra resolution.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Handling

The D600's right hand grip is rubberized and textured, plus there's a deep lip underneath the trademarked red accent, giving the middle finger plenty of extra leverage. The right thumb rest on the rear panel is also thoroughly rubberized, and there's another tall lip protruding from the area beneath the rear dial, allowing the thumb to latch on. Even the left side of the front panel is rubberized, and you'll also find a third ergonomic lip in this area, should you decide to position some finger tips over there.

Handling Photo 1

The D600 handles well, but our fingers could've used more room

While the rear panel's ergonomic features actually represent an improvement over the D800, we found the front hand grip a little too shallow. The grip doesn't protrude far enough from the rest of the body to give the full length of our fingertips a place to stay. Perhaps this is by design, considering the close proximity of two front panel shortcut buttons nearby. Either way, the body does have excellent overall balance, and all buttons and dials are positioned with attention to ergonomics, so we're awarding a strong score here.

Handling Photo 2

Even though TJ is holding the camera like a weirdo right now, we swear the thumb comes to rest in the right spot.

Buttons & Dials

Logically, the D600's control scheme is typical Nikon. A cluster of dual-purpose buttons are arranged vertically along the left side of the monitor, while the right side of the rear panel is reserved for buttons within reach of the right thumb, including AE-L, Live View, the directional pad, as well as the rear control dial (one of two found on the D600).

Buttons Photo 1

The rear control layout isn't exactly innovative, and you'll need to memorize locations.

Surrounding the shutter release, which feels excellent by the way, a few of the most important buttons are within easy reach, including exposure compensation, metering, and video record. You'll need to hold these down and then jog the dials to change settings, and you'll need a second hand to support the body while doing so.

The top panel is also home to the dual-function mode dial / drive mode dial, each half of which is locked by a mechanical release. This represents a tradeoff of speed for security: it takes extra effort to swap shooting modes and drive modes, but the locks prevent accidental adjustments.

Buttons Photo 2

The shutter release is excellent, while the D800's mode button has been replaced by a metering button.

Display(s)

The rear LCD monitor is a 3.2-inch display clocking in at a resolution of 921,000 dots. Frame coverage is once again 100%, but we spent far more time with the viewfinder and reserved the LCD mostly for video purposes (though proper videographers will want an external monitor). Nikon's classic scratch guard covers the entire monitor, but even with this addition neither reflectivity nor viewing angle are ever a problem. Brightness is more than sufficient for outdoor use, and onscreen color rendition is remarkably accurate to the final image.

Viewfinder

The D600's bright optical viewfinder is a joy to shoot with. Coverage is 100%, and the screen overlay illuminates red when a focus point locks on. The focus screen displays small boxes around each point, rather than dots or crosses, so you can always see exactly what you're focusing on.

Around the viewfinder is a removable rubber eye cup. Built-in diopter adjustment is accomplished via a small wheel above the eye cup, and it extends from -3 to +1m-1.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Design
  3. Product Tour
  4. Hardware
  5. Photo Gallery
  6. Image Quality
  7. Sharpness
  8. Color
  9. Noise Reduction
  10. Dynamic Range
  11. Low Light
  12. Distortion
  13. Video
  14. Usability
  15. Ease of Use
  16. Handling
  17. Controls
  18. Speed
  19. Features
  20. Video Features
  21. Specs & Ratings
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Compare Prices
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

What's Your Take?

All Comments