cameras

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T100 Digital Camera Review

Read a review of the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T100 point-and-shoot digital camera on DigitalCameraInfo.com

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Connectivity / Extras

Connectivity

*Software (4.5)

*The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T100 includes a CD-ROM in the box with a few software programs to organize photos and interact with the camera. Sony’s Picture Motion Browser Software version 2.0 helps users upload, organize, and search photos. If users purchase an optional GPS unit for their cameras, they can also plot the pictures on a world map.

Users must import photos into Picture Motion Browser software as soon as it’s installed in the computer. The software is only compatible with the Windows operating system. If pictures are not imported immediately, they must be manually loaded using the "register files" option in the File portion of the menu. Pictures can be viewed in a calendar or in folders. In the folder view, the size of the thumbnail can be adjusted and file information can be displayed if desired as a sort of "details" view.

The browsing software can display slide shows, burn CDs, and perform very basic editing functions. Users can rotate, trim, automatically correct, and manually adjust the sharpness, saturation, brightness, tone curve, and red-eye reduction of an image. The Sony Picture Motion Browser provides a lot of basic features but isn’t anything special.

The camera also comes with Picture Package Music Transfer that allows users to change the 4 preloaded soundtracks on the T100. Users can add music, but in order to add clips longer than 170 seconds, users will need to make sure their camera has the latest firmware. Prior to April 2007, cameras malfunctioned with longer clips but this problem has been fixed. To transfer music to the digital camera, users have to enter the Home menu in the camera before hooking up to the computer via the USB cable with the program open. This isn’t very intuitive, but easy after you’ve done it once.

Jacks, ports, plugs (5.0)

*The Sony T100 has only one port and it’s on the bottom of the camera. Users can purchase an optional CSS-HD1 cradle docking station so the T100 can sit upright while attaching the multi-connector cable, otherwise, users will have to lay it on its side to watch pictures and video on television or upload pictures to computers and printers. Laying the camera on its side can result in the finish and LCD screen being scratched, so the setup isn’t ideal. From the multi-connector, users can access AV-out and USB cables. An optional power adaptor can be purchased, and it fits into the battery compartment through a tiny "doggy door." New on Sony digital cameras this year is the capability to output high-definition video and pictures. However, to do this, users will need to purchase an optional component cable that Sony sells for $40. In the setup menu, users can choose NTSC or PAL settings for the AV-out, HD or SD options for component, and Auto, PictBridge, and Mass Storage options for the USB function.

T100-battery.jpg


*Direct Print Options
*(4.5)*

The Sony T100 is PictBridge compatible and can create print orders from the Home or Playback menus. Pictures can be quickly added all at once or one at a time by scrolling and checking a box in the corner that selects it for the print order. Users can’t choose the quantity of prints or whether it should have borders or anything fancy - only the basics.

*Battery (6.0)

*The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T100 comes with a NP-BG1 lithium-ion battery. The 3.6V, 960 mAh battery is heavy for its small size. It earns its weight though since it can last 340 shots before needing a recharge. The battery fits into a compartment on the right side of the camera body. There is a four-level indicator that gives users a good idea of how full or empty the battery is. The camera comes with a small and very portable wall-mount battery charger. It takes it about 330 minutes to charge a fully spent battery.

Memory*(4.0)*

T100-memory.jpg
This Cyber-shot has 31MB of internal memory, which isn’t much. That’s enough to fit 10 pictures at the highest resolution. The internal memory doesn’t allow users to record smooth video as it maxes out at recording 16.6 fps of 640 x 480-pixel video. The burst mode is also affected by the internal memory: it snaps 10 shots at a time instead of 100 like it does on a memory card. The Sony T100 accepts Memory Stick Duo and Memory Stick Duo Pro cards, and the latter is required to record decent 30 fps movies. The Sony T100 can accept up to 8GB cards, which is very impressive since most cameras still max out at 4GB. The T100 does not support the Access Control security feature that is on some Sony Memory Sticks though.

**Other features ***(3.5)*

HD Output – Sony is really trying to create links between all of its products so it threw in menus that are reminiscent of Playstations and included an option to output in high-definition to, perhaps, their line of HDTVs. The T100 can play slide shows complete with music from the Home or Playback menus.

Home Button – This is the nexus of the universe. Shooting, Playback, Print, Memory, and Settings tabs are in this menu, and lead to other menus. This does make it difficult to find features for those who are used to other digital cameras but makes it intuitive for computer-literate users because of its desktop-like layout.

Firmware Update – In April 2007, Sony issued a firmware update for the Cyber-shot T100. Apparently, earlier cameras’ slide shows didn’t play correctly when the music soundtrack was longer than 170 seconds. The update is available from the Sony website.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Testing / Performance
  2. Components
  3. Design / Layout
  4. Modes
  5. Control Options
  6. Image Parameters
  7. Connectivity / Extras
  8. Overall Impressions
  9. Conclusion
  10. Sample Photos
  11. Photo Gallery
  12. Specs / Ratings
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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