headphones

RHA MA750i Headphones Review

Solid, heavy construction that's best for bright sounds

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The Insides That Count

The RHA MA750i in–ear headphones scored well on all of our tests and didn’t have any particularly glaring problems. While their isolation result could’ve been better—especially considering this is usually an area in-ears excel in—they had a solid frequency response with minimal distortion that would be audible to the average listener.

Down below I’ll break down the individual tests and shed some light on the good, the bad, and the just okay.

Frequency Response

When we measure frequency response we start with a parent signal of 78dB and then measure what the particular pair of headphones reproduce across the audible spectrum (from 20Hz to 20kHz).

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Credit: Reviewed.com / Nick Schmiedicker

There is a greater boost in the higher bass frequencies and lower midrange frequencies than anywhere else on the audible spectrum.

In the sub bass range (20–60Hz) the MA750i in-ears had an output of about 68dB—half the relative volume of our parent signal—which then gradually rose to 75dB at 60Hz. That means that the really deep sub bass sounds of your music will get downplayed by the not-as-deep bass sounds. The bass range (60–300Hz) continues this steady increase until the sound peaks at 82dB at 250Hz.

From there, the level drops as the sounds head into the midrange of 300Hz–2kHz. The midrange sounds start at about 81dB but steadily drop until 2kHz, when they reach a 70dB output. The midrange and bass frequencies mirror each other relatively closely, so you shouldn’t expect one to overpower the other while you listen to music.

The high mids go from a short drop to 65dB at 2.5kHz before spiking back up to 77dB at 5kHz. Finally, going into the high frequencies (6–20kHz) the decibel levels fluctuate but stick pretty closely to 70dB overall.

Distortion

When headphones have a problem with distortion—any kind of crackling, fuzzy sounds—it's typically found in the sub bass and bass sounds. The MA750i in-ears aren’t any different, and the highest levels of distortion we found were in frequencies lower than 100Hz.

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Credit: Reviewed.com / Nick Schmiedicker

It's difficult for the human ear to pick up distortion in the sub bass and bass frequencies.

There are three main spikes to note: the first is at 20Hz with a total amount of distortion reaching 17%, the second is at 40Hz with 7% distortion, and finally a spike at 60Hz with 5% distortion. First, you should keep in mind that 3% is our threshold of what’s considered audible. While these values go higher than that, the sub bass and bass frequencies areas are the most difficult for the human ear to pick up distortion. So, there’s actually a pretty good chance you’ll hear minimal to no distortion at all, unless you have sensitive ears.

Once you get to the frequencies that are higher than 100Hz the amount of distortion sticks to 1% or lower, so there’s nothing to worry about there.

Isolation

The MA750i in-ears came with three different kinds of tips (with different sizes) that will all affect the amount of ambient noise that’s blocked. The basic silicon tips don’t handle outside ambient noise as well as we’d like compared to some of the other in-ears we’ve tested that have similar tips. They do still perform well enough that you shouldn’t worry too much about bringing them on your commute.

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Credit: Reviewed.com / Nick Schmiedicker

While not so great at blocking bass sounds, it's a different story for the midrange frequency sounds.

As far as bass sounds go (those that’re between 0 and 300Hz) the MA750i in-ears don’t block any sound. So, if you have a commute that involves a bus or a train—or if you’re taking these with you into the air—you can expect to be fully aware of any rumbling engines.

Moving into the midrange (sounds between 300Hz and 2kHz) the isolation is a lot stronger. Starting around 500Hz, the isolation levels take a sharp drop to half the original volume at 800Hz, and continues to reach a quarter as loud at 2kHz. This is where the bulk of the ambient sounds you’re likely to encounter are from, so you can expect more music than outside world during most of your day.

While you’re unlikely to encounter sounds with a frequency above this, if you did, the MA750i in-ears continue dropping the relative volume with a low of almost 1/16 its original volume at 4.5kHz. After this, the amount of isolation doesn’t do so well and the levels rise back to only being between a quarter and half as loud close to 8kHz.

Double Flange Tip Isolation
Credit: Reviewed.com / Nick Schmiedicker

The double-flange tips block much more bass sounds than the basic silicon tips.

The double-flange tips provide much better isolation overall, but you’ll sacrifice a certain level of comfort to achieve it. Using the double-flange tips will reduce the relative volume of the bass sounds to about half its original volume. This is a great improvement over the basic tips and the hits just keep on coming.

The midrange sounds start out being about a quarter as loud as they would normally and keep dropping to reach 1/8 as loud by 1kHz and then 1/16 as loud close to 2kHz. As I mentioned above, you aren’t likely to encounter a lot of ambient sounds that reach such a high frequency, but if you do they’ll be reduced to almost nothing.

Memory Foam Isolation
Credit: Reviewed.com / Nick Schmiedicker

They might be uncomfortable, but the memory foam tips provide the most amount of isolation.

Finishing out are the memory foam ear tips. These things are beefy and will most likely be the most uncomfortable of the three. But, if you don’t think they’re that bad, you’ll be able to block a truly impressive amount of ambient sound.

Bass sounds will start off sounding nearly a full quarter quieter than they would normally, which extends into the midrange frequencies. Sounds that have a frequency of 1kHz will reach a relative volume of 1/8 as loud which will drop to 1/16 around 3kHz. These are the tips you’ll want to have if you’re seated next to the wings on a long flight, as long as they’re not unbearably uncomfortable.

Other Tests

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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