ovens

KitchenAid Architect Series II KGRS303BSS Gas Range Review

It has that commercial look, but does it have the power?

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From the Lab

We ran the KitchenAid KGRS303BSS through an extensive scientific testing process. It excelled in some areas, but in others, it didn’t make the cut.

Oven & Broiler Performance

The most important part of our oven testing is the real world baking tests that we perform to see how the ovens handle actual food. In our cookie tests, we bake sugar cookies in the oven and then measure the difference in browning between the cookie tops and bottoms, as well as the difference in browning from one cookie to another. In our cake tests, we take similar measurements as we do in our cookie tests, while also noting the degree to which different spots in the same cake vary in doneness.

The cookies we baked in the oven’s convection setting emerged nearly perfect, with tops and bottoms that barely varied from one another when it came to doneness. Cakes, on the other hand, were disappointing. The browning varied from one part of a cake to another, as well as from one cake to another.

This points to a major flaw: that the oven can perhaps only keep up a specific temperature for short periods of time before beginning to fluctuate. This would explain the amazing cookie results and horrible cake results, as the cookies do not need to baked for as long as the cakes.

There’s no easy or straightforward fix for this kind of issue. We’d recommend turning your pan partway through the baking process, as well as keeping an eye on when your cake is done.

Rangetop Performance

The KGRS303BSS’s rangetop earned mixed scores during testing. Boiling speed was its top performance, with three burners boiling six cups of water in less than ten minutes. The two quickest burners were at the front of the stove, boiling six cups in 4:19 (front left) and 5:38 (front right). The only burner we’d recommend you don't use to boil water is the right rear simmer burner, which took more than 18 minutes to reach the sweet spot (since it was never designed to boil). That leaves four quick burners for corn, lobster, mussels, you name it.

The rangetop was not adept at reaching very high or very low heat. The highest temperatures its burners were able to reach ranged from 368°F to 464°F, with only two managing to peak above 400°F. For low temperature cooking, the range was from 137°F to 274°F. We don’t expect gas rangetops to get as hot as electric or induction, because they just typically don’t, but this finding wasn't up to par.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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