Pros

  • Beautifully designed

  • Fast and even toasting

  • Sturdy and well built

Cons

  • Fridge temperatures run a bit warm

Sounds amazing, but that's not all: This behemoth might have an MSRP a penny short of four grand, but we've found it on sale for $2,699. If you’re in the market for a luxury French door replete with toys and performance to match, be sure to check it out.

The James Bond of fridges

At first glance, this LG looks like a fairly standard high-end fridge: Stainless steel on the outside, glass shelves on the inside. A door-mounted icemaker is easy to access, and doesn’t take up much room in the main compartment.

But look a little closer and you'll find a number of hidden features that are quite useful. One of the four adjustable shelves has a retractable front half for storing tall items. In front of the crispers, two pieces of tempered glass cover the EasyReach storage zones. These little nooks are great for storing snacks for the kids, condiments, or any number of small items.

On the right, you also get LG’s door-in-door storage. The layout and accessibility of the compartment is identical to what we’ve seen on all other similarly equipped LG French doors.

Most surprising was the placement of the water filter. Instead of squeezing it between the crispers or putting it up in one of the top corners, LG has actually hidden the filter behind the lowest shelf on the left fridge door, right under the icemaker.

The freezer, while exceptionally well lit and very easy to open, is less exciting. Three drawers of varying height make it easy to organize your frozen food. In the middle of the fridge, you get a separate drawer for specialized storage. It comes programed with four different settings—Meat & Seafood, Cold Drinks, Deli Snack, and Chilled Wine—as well as a control lock for households with curious children.

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Turn it down!

As we mentioned, the entire fresh food compartment ran warm: Average temperatures came in at 39.49°F at the top, 38.86°F in the middle, and a whopping 42.56°F inside the door-in-door zone. Keep in mind that these numbers were recorded with the thermostat set to 37°F.

That’s way too warm, but turning the thermostat down by about two degrees should be enough to salvage this LG—especially given that it’s a very consistent fridge, with an average fluctuation of just ±0.2°F over 36 hours.

The freezer was even better: Average temperatures of -3.34°F at the top and -2.33°F at the bottom were more than sufficient to safely freeze food. Throw in a standard deviation of only ±0.18°F, and you’ve got a freezer that should be able to keep freezer burn at bay.

A fridge too warm...

This LG's test results were almost perfect. The freezer was sufficiently cold and very consistent, the crispers were extremely moisture-retentive, and the whole machine turned out to be quite energy efficient—even with the icemaker running. The only drawback was an overly warm fresh food section.

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We set thermostats to 37°F, and while some fridges run a bit warm, food usually still stays well below the safe threshold of 41°F. Anything warmer, and you risk bacterial growth and spoiled food.

Unfortunately, the LMXS30776S's door-in-door compartment crossed that line. Most of the fridge ran about two degrees too warm, but the test item we placed inside the door-in-door section averaged 42.6°F.

While we think a fridge that costs over $3,000 should be a relatively hands-off appliance, there's an easy way to improve this LG: Just turn the thermostat down by about two degrees.

Features include through-the-door ice and water, a fast ice mode, and a control lock. What makes this model impressive are its subtle design perks, such as the large central drawer and EasyReach storage areas in the fridge.

For in-depth performance information, please visit the Science Page.

Love those crispy veggies

While we were disappointed that such an expensive product didn’t come with adjustable crispers, the drawers in the fridge did a great job retaining moisture. Over the course of three days, our test materials lost a mere 0.12 grams of moisture per hour—on par with some of the best fridges we've tested. That means crisp carrots, crunchy peppers, and luscious lettuce with a reasonable shelf life.

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Pleasant surprises

If you like hidden compartments, the LG LMXS30776S might be for you. It’s a solid performer, as long as you remember to turn down the thermostat, and all those moving parts help you organize its massive interior.

There are plenty of fridges in this price range with unique features—like a hot water dispenser or built-in SodaStream. But the LMXS30776S impressed us with its $2,699 sale price and its storage options. If you need a big fridge but still want easy access to all your food, this LG is worth a look.

Competent freezing

The amount of time it took for our test materials to drop from room temperature to 32°F in the LG’s freezer was... well, just fine. It took one hour and 36 minutes, which is somewhat longer than average.

Fortunately, the freezer had no problem passing our power loss test. After 36 hours unplugged (to simulate an outage), internal temperatures had only warmed up to 27.22°F.

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Lots of shelves don’t always mean lots of space

When you shop for a fridge in the store, you’ll see advertised storage capacities. Consumers be warned: you won’t actually get that much food in your fridge. The number doesn’t take into account space taken up by shelves, light bulbs, gaps between the shelf and the wall, and other obstructions.

In the case of this LG—which has an advertised 21.3 cubic feet of storage in the fridge—we measured just 14.61 usable cubic feet. Tapered shelves, large gaps between shelves and the fridge walls, and other factors reduced the storage amount rather substantially. Given the large number of storage surfaces—including the “hidden” EasyReach compartments, door-in-door storage, and the large middle drawer above the freezer—we were definitely disappointed.

The freezer was a bit more forgiving, with three sliding drawers of assorted heights providing plenty of varied storage. In total, you get 5.78 usable cubic feet. It’s not exactly palatial for a fridge this size (and this price), but it should be more than enough for a mid-sized family. Also, keep in mind that a more cavernous fridge may be harder to organize than this LG.

More impressive was the fridge’s energy efficiency. Even with the icemaker running, the LG only used an average of 0.09 kWh per usable cubic foot. That’s incredibly efficient, especially for a fridge this size. At a fixed rate of $0.09 per kWh, that translates to an annual expense of roughly $59.02.

Meet the testers

Matthew Zahnzinger

Matthew Zahnzinger

Logistics Manager & Staff Writer

@ReviewedHome

Matthew is a native of Brockton, MA and a graduate of Northeastern, where he earned a degree in English and Theatre. He has also studied at the Gaiety School of Acting in Dublin and spends most of his free time pursuing a performance career in the greater Boston area.

See all of Matthew Zahnzinger's reviews

Checking our work.

We use standardized and scientific testing methods to scrutinize every product and provide you with objectively accurate results. If you’ve found different results in your own research, email us and we’ll compare notes. If it looks substantial, we’ll gladly re-test a product to try and reproduce these results. After all, peer reviews are a critical part of any scientific process.

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