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LG 55EA8800 Gallery OLED TV Review

55 in.

Design and picture quality that's truly worthy of the Louvre.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Behind The Screens

OLED stands for organic light-emitting diode, and while it's not as new as it sounds, it's still the biggest thing in TV tech right now. Like a plasma panel, an OLED panel's pixels can light up individually, producing pure colors and vibrant highlights, and shut off individually, rendering a complete black. For this reason, OLED TVs are bar-none the best performers on the market right now—but they're also prohibitively expensive.

As we expected, the LG 55EA8800 (MSRP $8,499.99) is an excellent performer on all fronts. I tested a full 178° horizontal viewing angle, mostly accurate colors, true black levels, and plenty of light output. What's more, LG's motion interpolation smooths out the action in just the right way, resulting in great-looking motion that mimics the way high-end gaming computers often render video.

The EA8800 isn't flawless, though. For example, it falls prey to auto light limiting, meaning luminance falls off inversely to the amount of the screen that's bright. And its green point is just a little oversaturated, resulting in a small loss in detail.

Calibration

We calibrate each TV so that its performance meets ideal standards for a dark, home theater viewing environment. This usually requires reducing the maximum luminance and adjusting the TV's gamma so that it adheres to an ideal of 2.4. We also correct any measurable discrepancies in color production, grayscale error (via white balance controls), and black and white clipping points.

The EA8800 is quite the premium TV, offering a generous host of picture controls: gamma, 2- and 20-point white balance, and also luminance, saturation, and hue of the primary and secondary color points.

The EA8800 is quite the premium TV, offering a generous host of picture controls. Tweet It

Most TVs wield an RGB (red, green, and blue) sub-pixel structure, which uses red, green, and blue color filters to create the colors you see on screen. The EA8800 uses a RGB+W (red, green, blue, and white) sub-pixel structure, however, so calibrating certain elements was tricky and took repeated passes to improve things. On the other hand, nothing was horribly off in the first place, so it could have been a lot worse.

Below, you'll find my final calibration settings alongside LG's pre-sets for the ISF Expert 1 picture mode. Notably, I reduced the OLED Light setting from 50 to 36, I altered the gamma pre-set from 2.2 to 2.4, and I raised the Brightness setting from 50 to 51.

Editor's note: Be sure to check back in a week. We have plans to post pro calibration settings for a partially lit room, as well.

LG-55EA8800-Calibration.jpg
Major changes to the TV's ISF Expert 1 pre-set included reducing the prevalence of green within the sub-pixel balance.

Contrast Ratio

Contrast ratio is a measure of a display's 100 IRE (peak) luminance divided by its 0 IRE (minimum) luminance. The resulting number, expressed as "X:1", is a telling sign of how immersive a TV looks. Essentially, a wide differentiation in luminance between the darkest and brightest elements on screen looks more like real life and less like the 2D plane you're actually watching.

Let me put it this way: Most TVs, especially LCDs, will light up a black room even when they're displaying an entirely black screen. The EA8800 just disappears. Tweet It

Like the OLEDs before it (the KN55S9C and the 55EA8800), the 55EA8800 is a stellar performer in this area. While it did test as ever-so-slightly less dark than the other OLEDs we compared it to, it's such a minute difference that you'd have to be nuts to worry about it. Using an ANSI checkerboard contrast pattern, I measured a black level of 0.002 cd/m2 and a peak brightness around 184 cd/m2, giving the EA8800 a huge contrast ratio of 92,000:1.

Note that while the EA8800's black level is only two-thousandths of a candela darker than the Panasonic ZT60, it's actually an entire magnitude of luminance darker overall.

Let me put it this way: Most TVs, especially LCDs, will light up a black room even when they're displaying an entirely black screen. The EA8800 just disappears.

LG-55EA8800-Contrast.jpg

Viewing Angle

The EA8800 again knocks things out of the park in classic OLED fashion. Basically, you can sit anywhere but behind it and get a clear, solid picture. OLED TVs rely on organic cells that emit their own light, unlike LCD TVs (which rely on backlights); therefore, since the organic light emitting diodes sit right up to the glass panel, light has less distance to travel before it reaches your eyes—and that makes for superb viewing angles.

The result is a full 178° viewing angle where contrast remains at least or above 50% of its head-on value. Even the best LCDs only offer about 90° of viewing, for example, before the picture starts to degrade notably at obtuse off-angles. With the EA8800, you can sit almost anywhere in the room (except behind it) and you'll be able to observe the same quality of black levels, luminance, and color saturation as if you were watching from directly in front.

LG-55EA8800-VA.jpg
Like the other OLED TVs we've tested, the EA8800 has a full 178° viewing angle.

Color Gamut

A color gamut is essentially a map of a TV's primary and secondary colors——red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, and white. These elements are then mixed to create varying gradations and hues, basically reproducing any color you've seen on modern TV or at the movies. When we test a television's color, we score it against the Rec. 709 HD TV ideal, the international standard for exactly which color points a TV should produce.

Like last year's EA9800 from LG, the 55EA8800 produces mostly accurate colors, but tends to oversaturate green slightly. This causes a small but appreciable loss in detail in areas with highly-saturated clusters of green, such as fields of grass or clusters of summer leaves.

The EA8800 is also capable of a wider, more saturated, expanded color gamut which doesn't currently have a standard to dictate its exact positioning within the color space. In the Picture menu, you can select the Expanded gamut to increase the vivacity of reds, greens, blues, and their secondary and tertiary colors. This can look a little unnatural at times, but it can also beautify certain kinds of content, like a nature documentary.

LG-55EA8800-Gamut.jpg
The EA8800 produces accurate red and blue points, but slightly oversaturates green.

Grayscale Error

A TV's grayscale is the spectrum of neutral shades it produces from black (0 IRE) to white (100 IRE), and all of the shades of gray in-between. All grayscale steps should adhere to the D65 white point, which is x=0.313, y=0.329 on the 1931 CIE color space.

When they don't, this results in error. This collective error is expressed in a DeltaE number, and is often the result of imbalances within the sub-pixel emphasis. Ideally, a TV will have a grayscale DeltaE of 3 or less.

Prior to calibration, the EA8800 tested with a DeltaE of 5.34—not bad, but a little higher than we like to see. Primary error (deviation from the D65 white point standard) occurred at 80, 90, and 100 IRE. After calibrating the TV using built-in 2- and 20-point grayscale controls, the DeltaE was reduced to 2.69.

LG-55EA8800-Grayscale.jpg
Prior to calibration, the EA8800 tested with a grayscale DeltaE of 5.34.

RGB Balance

Error within the grayscale like what we outlined above is often the result of an imbalance in the TV's RGB (red, green, and blue) sub-pixel emphasis. Over-emphasizing any one sub-pixel imbalances the neutrality of the black, gray, and white shades in the grayscale, rendering them with a reddish, blueish, or greenish tint.

Prior to calibration, the EA8800 overemphasized the green sub-pixel, resulting in a greenish hue that negatively impacted the purity of the neutral shades of the grayscale. Using the TV's 2- and 20-point white balance controls, I was able to reduce the green emphasis and shore up red and blue, in order to achieve a more neutral white balance across the input spectrum.

LG-55EA8800-RGB.jpg
Prior to calibration, the EA8800 tended to overemphasize the green sub-pixel.

Gamma Sum

Gamma refers to the amount of luminance a display adds to each step of the grayscale from black to white. If the display adds a lot of luminance out of black, and tapers off towards white, it's better for a brighter room. If the display adds a small amount of luminance out of black, and increases less gradually towards white, it's better for a darker room. These gamma sums are often expressed in numbers like 1.8, 2.0, 2.2, or 2.4, with lower numbers being more appropriate for a brighter room.

Prior to calibration, the EA8800 tested with a gamma sum of 2.25—pretty good for a room with a moderate amount of lighting. Despite correcting the grayscale and setting the gamma pre-set value to 2.4, the TV's final gamma was still a fairly "bright" sum of 2.27.

This means that steps above black (0 IRE) are not as dark as they would be at a gamma of 2.4. The difference is very slight, and it may be that it's difficult for the TV to approximate the exact brightness at each step simply because 0 IRE is itself such a small (essentially non-existent) amount of luminance. This doesn't detract from viewing in any appreciable manner, but it does mean that the EA8800 is slightly better-suited to a partially lit room than an entirely black room.

LG-55EA8800-Gamma.jpg
Prior to calibration, the EA8800 tested with a gamma sum of 2.25.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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