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Toshiba Regza 40XV645U LCD HDTV Review

40 in.

Unfortuntelly the bad simply outweighs the good with the Toshiba Regza 40XV645U.

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Motion

Motion Summary
{{article.attachments['Toshiba-40XV645U-vanity.jpg']}} • Significant motion blurring • Obvious artifacts in moving objects • Good handling of 3:2 pulldown conversion • Testing done with DisplayMate software
{{article.attachments['tvi-prev.jpg']}} Color Accuracy Page 5 of 18 Viewing Effects {{article.attachments['tvi-next.jpg']}}

Motion Smoothness*(5.25)*


One of the Toshiba Regza 40XV645U's signatue features is 120Hz refresh rate, which theoretically should help with motion performance. Unfortunately we didn't see a ton of evidence for this when looking at moving objects on the display. We did like that moving faces held together pretty well, albeit with an obvious cartoonish cast, but we saw massive amounts of motion blur with moving blocks of color, especially when viewing in 1080i. We've seen significantly better motion smoothness from other HDTVs that sport 120Hz refresh rate, although we should also mention that if you turn this feature off things get really ugly.

 

Motion Artifacting*(4.75)*


Artifacts are things that appear on the display that should not be there. With the Toshiba Regza 40XV645U we detected quite a few artifacts related to moving objects. There was a very obvious judder in certain moving scenes, and we also saw the same rolling shutter effect we've seen on other HDTVs, although the 40XV645U was actually a bit better than average in this respect. What concerned us more is that we saw a flat out inversion of colors in some moving objects, which should never happen.

 

3:2 Pulldown & 24fps*(8.5)*


3:2 pulldown is the process by which an HDTV converts broadcast content that is received at 60 frames per second into 24 frames per second. This is primarily done for films that are supposed to be viewed at the lower frame rate to get that film-like look. The Toshiba Regza 40XV645U did a good job with this conversion, with barely noticeable glitches in our test pattern. You do need to turn on the Film Stabilization feature in the advacned picture menu in order for this conversion to happen appropriately, but there's really no reason not to leave this feature on. There are two options here, Standard and Smooth, in addition to Off. We didn't see a significant difference between the two so select the one that looks best to you. The 40XV645U also supports content that comes in natively at 24 frames per second, for example films played from a DVD or Blu-ray player.

 

Compare the Toshiba Regza 40XV645U to other HDTVs
{{article.attachments['Sony-KDL-46Z5100-vanity.jpg']}} {{article.attachments['Samsung-LN40B650-vanity.jpg']}} {{article.attachments['JVC-LT-42P300-vanity.jpg']}}
Sony KDL-46Z5100 46 inches Samsung LN40B650 40 inches JVC LT-42P300 42 inches
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Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Remote Control
  9. Connectivity
  10. Audio & Menus
  11. Formats & Media
  12. Power Consumption
  13. Vs Sony KDL46Z5100
  14. Vs Samsung LN40B650
  15. VS JVC LT42P300
  16. Conclusion
  17. Series Comparison
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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