Beauty

This moisturizing lip mask is the last thing I put on every night—here's why

Seriously, you have to try this.

Sha Ravine Spencer Holding Laneige Lip Sleeping Mask Credit: Sha Ravine Spencer

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As a self-proclaimed beauty junkie, I have a wheelable storage cabinet full of goodies to treat, highlight, mask, or enhance just about every part of my body from head to toe. In fact, I have a bin neatly labeled “lips'' that has every color lipstick, gloss, or tint you could ever imagine, but this bin rarely ever contained lip masks or scrubs. I never thought much about the additional care my lips would need after frequent use of matte lipsticks and thick glosses. I’d usually apply some Vaseline Rosy Lip Therapy or Blistex to keep my lips moisturized while doing my makeup or before bed to avoid dry cracked lips.

That all changed when I discovered the Laneige Lip Sleeping Mask, a.k.a. the secret behind my pillowy-soft lips. During one of my many Sephora trips, I crossed paths with the lip mask in a special edition “Sephora’s Favorites” box dedicated to its best-selling lip care products. Thus, my love affair with Laniege’s Lip Sleeping Mask began and it quickly became a staple that I keep in my personal stockpile as well as my beauty routine for maintaining moisturized, healthy lips.

What is Laneige's Lip Sleeping Mask and what does it claim?

Lip Sleeping Mask
Credit: Sha Ravine Spencer

The Laneige Lip Sleeping Mask (shown above in mini version) comes in five flavors.

The Laneige Lip Sleeping Mask is an overnight lip mask that claims to aid in soothing and moisturizing the lips for a smoother and more plump feel and appearance. It contains hyaluronic acid to help to retain the moisture in your lips and vitamin C to help promote the production of collagen, a protein found in the skin, and protect the skin on your lips. The mask also claims to have an “exclusive Moisture Wrap technology” that forms “a protective film over the lips to lock in moisture and active ingredients.” Aside from "Original Berry," it comes in four other flavors: "Vanilla," "Gummy Bear," "Apple Lime," and "Sweet Candy."

With regular use of the Laneige mask, the brand says you can expect a reduction of fine lines on your lips, less dryness and cracking, and lips that feel softer to the touch. For best use, the instructions say to apply a generous layer of the mask at bedtime to reduce flakiness on the lips. You can either use your finger or the included doe-foot applicator to scoop the product out, if you’re concerned about the hygiene element of dipping your finger into a jar.

What’s it like to use the Laneige Lip Sleeping Mask?

comparison photo
Credit: Sha Ravine Spencer

Compared to the Tatcha Kissu Lip Mask, the Laneige (shown above in a mini jar) feels creamier.

At first, I was hesitant to slather the mask on out of fear that it might feel sticky or gooey with excess application. Still, I followed the instructions and, to my delight, it has a silky texture that goes on smooth and doesn’t feel slimy. In comparison to the similar-looking Tatcha Kissu Lip mask, which I found to be a thick jelly-like texture, the Laneige is the complete opposite. The Lip Sleeping Mask falls right in that sweet middle spot where it’s thick enough to pack moisture onto your lips, but light enough to not leave a greasy or sticky residue. The smooth, velvety texture makes this lip mask almost feel as light as applying a lip balm, which I love! The original berry flavor has a very light fruity fragrance—thanks to a combination of raspberry, strawberry, cranberry, and blueberry extracts—that doesn’t linger for too long after applying it.

This mask isn’t thick or greasy enough to stain sheets or pillowcases like many other overnight, moisture-rich products tend to do. The instructions on this product suggest you should wipe or cleanse it off in the morning, though I’ve never woken up the next morning with anything left to wipe off, leading me to believe it all absorbed into my skin. I can attest to this lip mask soothing and moisturizing because I always wake up with hydrated lips in the mornings, even without any product left behind. Even though it's marketed as an overnight lip mask, I use it whenever my lips feel dry and need some moisture throughout the day, too.

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Laneige's Lip Sleeping Mask has changed my lip care routine forever and leaves me with smooth, plush lips that stay moisturized for hours after applying. As a result, it has quickly won the title of my favorite lip mask or balm on the market because it’s really that good!

Is the Laneige Lip Sleeping Mask worth it?

SRS Laneige Lip Mask KSS
Credit: Sha Ravine Spencer

The Laneige Lip Sleeping Mask (shown above in a mini version) is what I reach for any time my lips need moisture.

I use this stuff a lot and find myself buying a new pot every six months. The lip mask comes in a 0.70-ounce jar with a doe-foot applicator to help you get every last bit of the product out of the jar when you reach the bottom. It retails for $22 on Sephora’s site, which is not bad, considering you'd have to spend about $15 to get a similar quantity in the Blistex balm. And, compared to other lip masks that have a higher price tag, like Tatcha’s Kissu Lip Mask that contains 0.32 ounces of product for $28, the Laneige Lip Sleeping Mask is a great value.

Though you may be able to get a better bang for your buck, I believe the mask is worth the price tag because it packs some great ingredients to keep your lips silky and moisturized. I’m on my third jar of Laneige’s Lip Sleeping Mask and I can confidently say it’s definitely worth the try and buy! This lip mask is now a staple in my beauty arsenal and in heavy rotation to keep my lips soft, supple, and moisturized.

Get the Laneige Lip Sleeping Mask on Sephora for $22

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Prices were accurate at the time this article was published but may change over time.

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