Cameras

Kodak Announces First CMOS EasyShare Camera

Kodak today announced its first ever EasyShare point-and-shoot with a CMOS image sensor, a deviation from the traditional CCD sensors that are typically used in compact cameras. With the newly implemented CMOS chip, the 5-megapixel Kodak EasyShare C513 p

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*July 24, 2007 *– Kodak today announced its first ever EasyShare digital camera with a CMOS sensor, a deviation from the more traditional CCD chip that is typically employed in point-and-shoot cameras. With the new internal design, Kodak promises the 5-megapixel C513 will produce excellent color and dynamic range with low noise. The EasyShare C513 will retail for the modest price of $79.95 when the camera ships in August.

The EasyShare C513 carries a Kodak KAC-05011 CMOS sensor. With the new hardware, Kodak plans to take advantage of the benefits associated with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) technology versus CCD (charge-coupled device) sensors, including "power, integration and cost benefits," according to a company press release today.

"Today’s announcement validates our continued progress to become a leading mass-market supplier of next-generation CMOS image sensors," said Kodak General Manager Chris McNiffe of Image Sensor Solutions group in the release. "Kodak camera customers expect both ease of use and performance from KODAK EASYSHARE cameras, and we are excited to provide this CMOS technology in a truly affordable and accessible device.' 

With this release, Kodak enters into the CMOS point-and-shoot category, a position that competing manufacturers Canon and Sony have been increasingly pursuing of late. Both Canon and Sony have made recent investments in the interest of boosting CMOS sensor production.

The C513 is fitted with a 3x optical zoom lens and 2.4-inch LCD screen, and offers still and video capture options. Other features include Digital Image Stabilization and built-in editing functions.

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