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The Best Bed Pillows Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

The Best Pillows of 2022

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The Best Bed Pillows Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

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Reviewed's mission is to help you buy the best stuff and get the most out of what you already own. Our team of product experts thoroughly vet every product we recommend to help you cut through the clutter and find what you need.

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Editor's Choice Product image of  Coop Home Goods Original Pillow
Best Overall

Coop Home Goods Original Pillow

Anyone willing to tinker with the amount of fill in the Coop Home Goods Original Pillow for a few days will see major payoffs with this comfortable, washable pillow. Read More

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Adjustable fill
  • Washable

Cons

  • May need to tinker with fill levels
  • Needs to air out
Editor's Choice Product image of Beckham Hotel Collection Gel Pillow - 2 Pack
Best Value

Beckham Hotel Collection Gel Pillow - 2 Pack

These pillows are a great option for guest rooms and folks willing to get a new pillow more often—but many side sleepers won't find them supportive enough. Read More

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Washable
  • Didn't smell after opening

Cons

  • May not provide sufficient loft for some side sleepers
Product image of Brooklinen Down Pillow - Firm
Best Down

Brooklinen Down Pillow - Firm

Brooklinen doesn't falsely advertise how firm this pillow is. It's a quality pillow, and what it lacks in washability, it makes up for in comfort. Read More

Pros

  • Firm
  • Supportive
  • Comfortable and plush

Cons

  • Dry clean only
  • May compress over time
Product image of Original Casper Pillow
Best Down Alternative

Original Casper Pillow

The Casper pillow is two pillows in one. As a unit it worked for side sleeping, but it's too thick for those who prefer back and stomach sleeping. Read More

Pros

  • Good support for side sleeping
  • Washable
  • Little odor

Cons

  • Not great for back and stomach sleepers
  • Not adjustable
Editor's Choice Product image of Leesa Premium Foam Pillow
Best Memory Foam

Leesa Premium Foam Pillow

The Leesa Pillow offers a springy, supportive surface that many back and side sleepers will like, though some may find it too thick. Read More

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Washable cover
  • Good support for back sleepers

Cons

  • May be too thin for some back sleepers
  • Little odor after opening

At Reviewed, we love sleep. It’s important to us that we rest well each night, and we want you to be able to do the same no matter how you curl up: side sleepers, back sleepers, and stomach sleepers. After several months of testing, a handful of pillows and pillow brands stood out from the pile for not one, but two, and even all three sleep positions.

Our favorite pillows are from Coop Home Goods (available at Amazon) for one simple reason: They’re filled with lofty-yet-soft shredded foam, and you can add or subtract the amount of stuffing to suit your preferences and spine-alignment needs.

For anyone on a budget, the Beckham Hotel Gel Pillow 2-Pack (available at Amazon) is our pick for a great value. Plus, we have recs for those who want a down pillow, a memory-foam pillow, and more.

Here are the best pillows we tested ranked, in order:

  1. Coop Home Goods
  2. Brooklinen
  3. Leesa Pillow
  4. Original Casper Pillow
  5. Tempur-Pedic Tempur-Cloud
  6. Xtreme Comforts Shredded Memory Foam Pillow
  7. AmazonBasics Down Alternative Pillows
  8. Tuft & Needle Original Pillow
  9. Tempur-Pedic Tempur-Cloud Dual Breeze
  10. Beckham Hotel Gel Pillow
  11. Nectar Memory Foam Pillow
  12. My Pillow
  13. Purple Pillow
  14. Target Room Essentials
  15. Purple Harmony

a hand pulling out filling from the Coop Home Goods Original Pillow
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

The Coop Home Goods Pillow is great for everyone because of its adjustable, shredded-foam fill.

Best Overall
Coop Home Goods Original Pillow

After a battery of tests, we determined the best pillows for most sleepers are made by Coop Home Goods. Both models we tested, the Original and Eden, ranked as top picks in our three position-specific reviews and would even suit combination sleepers.

Coop Home Goods pillows are stuffed with soft and supportive shredded memory foam, which has a similar plush feel to down or down-alternative fills. However, they allow you to add or remove fill for a customized loft and feel.

We tested other adjustable pillows, but these from Coop Home Goods outpaced them in comfort as well as in their relative lack of chemical smell, an issue for foam bedding in general. Getting the fill level just right may be a chore at first—our testers fussed with it over the course of several nights—but after that, the pillows are a dream.

Coop Home Goods pillows are covered in a super soft bamboo fabric, which our testers appreciated even though they encased them with pillow protectors. The Original pillow is an excellent choice for different sleep styles, including side and back sleeping. It provides the right amount of support, and anyone who prefers a softer or less-lofty feel can remove filling.

Those seeking an even softer pillow, particularly stomach sleepers, should look to the Coop Home Goods Eden. This pillow has a softer texture, but offers the same adjustability in its fill level.

Coop Home Goods pillows are fully machine-washable—both the cover and the shredded fill. In our testing, they emerged from the laundry no worse for wear, though you’ll need time for multiple dryer cycles. Both pillows come with an extra half-pound bag of stuffing, which may be enough to set aside if you need to completely swap out the contents down the line.

Coop Home Goods also offers a generous 100-night sleep trial, so you have plenty of time to tinker with the fill level and decide if their pillows are truly the best fit for you.

Pros

  • Affordable

  • Adjustable fill

  • Washable

Cons

  • May need to tinker with fill levels

  • Needs to air out

a man sleeping on one of the Beckham Hotel Gel pillows
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

The Beckham Hotel Pillows provide a surprising level of comfort, and are a great option for a guest room or people who prefer to replace their pillows more often.

Best Value
Beckham Hotel Collection Gel Pillow - 2 Pack

The Beckham Hotel Pillows come in a package of two, at a price that’s lower than that of many individual pillows we tested. They offer greater support for side sleepers—who account for half or more of people—than other affordable pillows we tested, and are far fluffier. Their fill lends a feeling and texture that’s much more similar to down than the quilt-batting sensation of other synthetic-fill pillows we tried.

Also, unlike some others, the Beckham Hotel pillows didn’t show signs of wear from testing. The covers didn’t crinkle or pucker from the heated blanket, the fill bounced back nicely after being weighted overnight, and the entire pillow came out of the laundry unscathed. We think these attributes make them the best budget choice for outfitting a guest room, for filling pillow shams as extra decor, or for folks who prefer to replace their pillows more regularly.

A few quibbles, particularly if you plan to use these pillows yourself night after night: Our side sleeper, whose frame is on the narrow side, thought the Beckham Hotel pillow aligned her head, neck, and shoulder just fine. But she worried folks with broader shoulders might be left unsupported and misaligned. Stomach sleepers and many back sleepers will likely feel overly propped up by the mid-level loft. (See “Other Pillows We Tested” below for alternative options.)

The Beckham Hotel pillows are covered by a 30-day satisfaction guarantee, so if you try them and aren’t happy, you should contact the company for a full refund.

Pros

  • Affordable

  • Washable

  • Didn't smell after opening

Cons

  • May not provide sufficient loft for some side sleepers

hands pressing into a Brooklinen down pillow
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

Brooklinen Down Pillows are treated with "antimicrobials," which will help keep the dry-clean-only pillow clean.

Best Down
Brooklinen Down Pillow

For devotees of the classic natural-feather filling, look no further than the Brooklinen Down Pillow. It comes in three densities designed to cater to different sleep positions. The firm pillow is best for side sleepers, the mid-plush is intended for back sleepers, and the plush is best for stomach sleepers.

In our side and back sleeper tests, our tester selected the firm and plush Brooklinen pillows as her absolute favorites. (She's spent her whole life sleeping on down.) The firm pillow cradled and supported the head and neck with its dense loft, which has far less squish (in a good way) than you might expect.

On the flip side, the plush pillow felt like a thin, puffy cloud when used for stomach sleeping. Back sleepers, however, may not be as thrilled with the mid-plush offering—our tester’s head sunk through it within hours. That said, down isn’t the recommended fill for holding the head and neck in alignment when lying supine anyway.

Other considerations before selecting down: On top of generally being pricier, this fill material is often dry clean only, and Brooklinen’s pillows are no exception. The surface can be spot-cleaned, but you can’t throw the whole thing in the wash like many synthetic-fill pillows. For what it's worth, Brooklinen says its pillows are treated with “antimicrobials” to help inhibit the growth of bacteria.

Down and down alternative face one mutual challenge: They may have a decreased ability to spring back over time, as the feathers compress with regular use. The Brooklinen pillows didn’t show any immediate signs of that, though, as they readily sprung back in our weighted-pressure lab test.

If you buy a Brooklinen Pillow and don’t love it, the company has your back with a generous 365-day return window, regardless of the pillow’s condition.

Pros

  • Firm

  • Supportive

  • Comfortable and plush

Cons

  • Dry clean only

  • May compress over time

The Casper Original pillow on a yellow bedspread
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

The Original Casper Pillow is composed of two pieces to provide cushion without compromising on support.

Best Down Alternative
Original Casper Pillow

Filled with polyester microfiber, the Original Casper Pillow provides a similar sensation to down without compromising on supportiveness or loft. Constructed in two pieces, it’s quite literally a pillow within a pillow to give you the best of both worlds. The inner pillow is a densely packed core that provides structure, whereas the fluffy outer shell lends a welcoming surface to rest your head on.

The thickness makes it a great choice for side sleepers. It performed well for stomach sleepers, too, but with one major caveat: Our tester used it as two separate units, not the package deal as it’s designed to be used. She loved sleeping on just the inner core, which had enough structure to support her neck but was sufficiently flat that it didn’t push her head up from the mattress.
Unfortunately, the Casper pillow didn’t hit a happy medium for back sleeping: Our tester found that it was too thick with both components and too thin with only the core. Nonetheless, this pillow will meet the needs of the vast majority of folks looking for a great down-alternative option.

The jury’s still out on whether down or down-alternative fill is best for people who suffer allergies. That's why experts say that being able to wash a pillow is the best way to clear out allergens. The Casper pillow’s construction makes it even easier to launder than other pillows we tested. The outer shell can be washed separately from the inner core—and as the core is already buffered by the outer layer, it may need less washing.

You can also machine-wash the entire pillow, though the company notes you should remove the core from the outer section even if you run both pieces in the same load. According to a customer-service representative, you shouldn’t wash the pillow more than twice per year, for durability and to maintain the fill’s integrity. Nonetheless, the representative imagined overzealous washers would only start having issues from excessive laundering around year four—well beyond a pillow’s suggested lifespan.

The pillow's case is made with a tight percale weave, likely 300 thread count according to the company rep, which may make it better at blocking out allergens.

If you want to put it to the test yourself, Casper offers a 100-night sleep trial.

Pros

  • Good support for side sleeping

  • Washable

  • Little odor

Cons

  • Not great for back and stomach sleepers

  • Not adjustable

hands pressing into the Leesa memory foam pillow
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

The Leesa Pillow, which is made with one solid piece of memory foam, provides a great balance of support and give.

Best Memory Foam
Leesa Pillow

The solid-foam Leesa pillow provides a good balance of supportiveness and surface give. It’s made with one big piece of memory foam, giving it more structure than all our other top picks. It's especially ideal for back sleepers, who dread the idea of their heads sinking through moveable fills overnight. For folks who prefer something low-maintenance in terms of fluffing and reshaping, this is a great choice.

What’s more, the foam may lend the pillow greater longevity because it won’t compress or become unevenly distributed over time. Leesa claims the pillow’s “ventilation channels” improve airflow to keep you cool throughout the night.

Our back sleeper, indeed, noticed it was cooler than other pillows she tested. Our lab testing confirmed that it doesn’t retain heat. It’s also worth noting that this pillow had a less noticeable odor upon arrival than other foam pillows we tested.

For all the great qualities foam has, it isn’t without its flaws. For starters, the Leesa pillow isn’t fully machine-washable. The fabric cover, a soft polyester-lycra blend, is removable and can be laundered, but the foam itself is spot-clean only. In addition, most stomach sleepers will find the pillow too thick.

If you give it a try, know that Leesa has a shorter return and trial period than many we tested—just 30 nights. If you decide you don’t like the pillow, Leesa will provide a prepaid label to send the pillow back, regardless of its condition.

Pros

  • Affordable

  • Washable cover

  • Good support for back sleepers

Cons

  • May be too thin for some back sleepers

  • Little odor after opening

How We Tested

an array of pillows on a bed
Credit: Reviewed / Lindsey Vickers

Our testers rotated through a variety of pillows, sleeping on each for at least two nights.

The Tester

I’m Lindsey Vickers, the sleep writer here at Reviewed. I cover everything from meditation apps to bed sheets. I’m a hybrid sleeper and alternate between my side and stomach, so I was excited to test pillows for both of those positions.

Of course, we couldn’t neglect back sleepers, so we recruited editor Sarah Hagman, a self-proclaimed “reformed side sleeper." She started sleeping on her back after a shoulder injury, and hasn’t looked back since, making her the perfect person to find the best pillow for the position.

The Tests

For several months we had a rotating cast of pillows in and out of our bedrooms—occasionally the same one, if the manufacturer claimed it suited more than one sleep position. We slept on each pillow for at least two nights and considered fundamental questions.

Is the pillow comfortable and sufficiently supportive from the moment our heads touched down on the fluff until our morning alarms went off? How customizable iss it? (If it’s customizable, how easy is it to remove layers or stuffing?) Does it get hot overnight? How well does the pillow’s performance match company claims? Does the fill feel lumpy? If so, can the lumps be smoothed away? (You get the idea.)

Afterward, the pillows were sent to our lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where our scientists put them through the wringer. They tested for heat retention with temperature sensors and a heated blanket; weighted them down overnight to check how well the material responded and sprung back the next day; and washed them per care label instructions, too.

What You Should Know About Pillows

Pillows are perhaps the second most important piece of bedding after your mattress, even though they should have a much higher rate of turnover. In fact, you should replace your pillow every one to two years, says John McKeon, CEO of Allergy Standards Limited and spokesperson for The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA).

Some pillow companies offer as long as 10-year warranties, which is a nice vote of confidence in their products, but even a 5-year warranty will amply cover a pillow's recommended lifespan.

For your comfort throughout the night and in your waking hours, there’s one thing to bear in mind when shopping for a pillow: spinal alignment. While we sleep, the position of our head and neck can put our spine out of alignment, which prevents muscles from relaxing and recovering overnight.

Spinal alignment is hard to define, and even harder to visualize for yourself. What experts suggest is thinking about your posture when you stand. In a standing position, your ear, shoulder, hip, knee, and ankle should be vertically aligned in profile view. You want to your neck supported as you sleep, and to maintain the alignment and natural, slight “S”-like curve of the spine.

While some pillows are marketed for all sleep positions, they often aren’t truly effective in all positions, since each has unique support needs. Side sleepers need “firm” pillows, which are taller and denser, to prevent their neck from drooping down. However, they shouldn’t be so thick and dense that they push the neck and head up.

In contrast, Stomach sleepers, want to look for thin pillows that are soft and have ample give, because craning the head upward can trigger neck pain. These pillows are often marked as “plush.”

Meanwhile, Back sleepers need something in the middle ground, to cradle their neck and head without letting it loll back or causing their chin to jut forward. These pillows may be labeled “medium density” or “mid-plush.”

When shopping for somewhere to rest your head, it’s important to consider the materials, shape, and construction. But what are the benefits, differences, and downsides of various materials and constructions? Here’s what you need to know about pillows.

Pillow Fill, Material, and Construction

the Nectar foam pillow has a gusset panel
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

The Nectar Foam Pillow has a "gusset," or rectangular panel of fabric sewn around the perimeter, that provides more loft for side sleepers.

There are numerous types of pillows, with different fills that offer unique benefits, and create different sensations when they cradle your head as you rest.

Down fill has long dominated the pillow industry, creating a plush surface that's responsive to pressure. It may be less durable because the delicate feathers become permanently compressed, generally after a year or so of use. Down pillows also frequently fall on the pricier side.

The feathers are less structured than foam and shredded foam fills, which can leave side sleepers’ heads and necks unsupported. For back sleepers, this is less of a concern, though too-lightly-packed down may displace overnight and leave their heads with no support come morning. For stomach sleepers, some of whom can get by without a pillow at all, it’s a non-issue and can even be a selling point. Down pillows are usually dry-clean-only, making their care potentially bothersome.

Down-alternative fill is generally made from polyester or a rayon-polyester blend. Pillows with this filling aim to replicate the feel of a down pillow, often with a lower price tag. While down-alternative products were thought to be better for people with allergies, research has shown that they may actually trap more allergens than down bedding, McKeon says, though further research is needed.

One possible explanation for greater allergen accumulation is manufacturers using looser weave encasements. Traditional down pillows are often encased in tightly woven fabric to prevent the feathers from escaping, which also helps buffer the fill from allergens. In any case, using an allergy-protective encasement can help, as does regular washing of covers and pillows, which are generally machine-washable.

Solid foam pillows are made with one thick piece of foam, or several layers of it fused together. Sometimes they take the form of a giant sponge, other times they’re contoured and look like a “B” rotated onto its back. These pillows tend to have more longevity than down and down alternative, as the foam won’t compress over time.

In our testing, solid-foam pillows often emitted a chemical odor for the first few days after being opened—likely due to off-gassing of the foam itself. Once the air is clear, foam can be a great material for side sleepers and some back sleepers, as it provides support and shape but still offers some give. However, these same qualities also make this pillow material a poor choice for stomach-sleeping.

Shredded foam feels more like a down or down-alternative pillow, as opposed to pillows made of solid foam. These pillows often come super stuffed and with extra fill so sleepers can add or take away fill until they find their perfect loft and feel. For that reason, these pillows can serve all positions and will appeal to a wider audience. Plus, shredded foam may be less likely to compress over time than down and down alternative.

Latex is, believe it or not, another type of foam. It's generally naturally-derived, which can mean it's more eco-friendly than other types of foam.

Latex pillows can be made with one of two types of latex: Talalay, or Dunlop. The difference lies in the manufacturing process. One involves vacuum sealing a mold, whereas the other does not. Dunlop latex tends to have a firmer feel, whereas Talalay latex can feel softer.

Gussets, or the rectangular panels that are sewn around the perimeter of a pillow, are a feature side sleepers in particular may want to consider. This construction provides additional loft and support for side sleepers’ necks, and may better fill the space between their ear, neck, shoulder, and the bed. Stomach and back sleepers may be better off avoiding them, as they tend to make pillows too lofty.

Adjustable or customizable pillows, which offer the option to remove shredded foam stuffing, layers of padding, or other types of fill, are a great way to ensure you get just the right fit and feel.

Temperature and Pillows

Your room’s temperature is a major factor in your sleep quality. In fact, there’s more substantial evidence supporting its role in quality rest than avoiding blue light before bed.

The right pillow can help keep your head cool and make a tremendous difference in your overall sleep. In studies, cooling caps have even helped insomniacs doze off, so if you run hot, prioritizing a pillow you can chill with may improve your sleep.

For the most part, the pillows we tested generally didn’t retain heat, regardless of claims the companies did or didn’t make about cooling properties and features. The exception: Our side sleeper immediately noticed the cooling feel of the Tempur-Cloud Dual Breeze in her home sleep tests, and our lab testing confirmed it diffused heat noticeably faster than the other pillows we tested (read more in "Other Pillows We Tested," below).


Other Pillows We Tested

Product image of Tempur-Pedic TEMPUR-Cloud Pillow
Tempur-Cloud Pillow

The Tempur-Cloud is made from solid memory foam and won’t disappoint fans of that material—you can feel the pillow slowly mold to your head as you settle down to rest. That’s not to say this is a soft pillow. In fact, our back-sleeping tester said it skews toward being firm—and it was among her favorites. She found the pillow just thick enough to provide support, but not so lofty that it pushed her chin or head up.

In fact, the pillow has a low profile and is far thinner than many of the others we tested. This makes it well-suited to side sleepers with small frames, but our stomach sleeper still found it pushed her head up at an uncomfortable angle. (Even though the company says it works for this position, we’d recommend against it.)

The pillow has a of couple minor downsides. The foam is wrapped in a removable, machine-washable cover, but the foam itself can only be spot-cleaned. In addition, it retained a little heat in lab testing. Also, Tempur-Pedic’s return policy for pillows is unforgiving—the pillow is yours after you’ve used it.

Pros

  • Moderate thickness for back sleepers

  • Affordable

  • Softer memory foam surface

Cons

  • Limited versatility

  • Profile too low for many

  • Retains heat

Product image of Xtreme Comforts Hypoallergenic Shredded Memory Foam Pillow
Xtreme Comforts Shredded Memory Foam Pillow

The Xtreme Comforts Shredded Memory Foam Pillow was previously a top pillow pick, but in our revamped recent testing, it didn’t perform as well. The pillow is similar to the Coop Home Goods Original and Eden, with one major flaw: its smell. We received two samples of this pillow, and both our testers noted just how noxious it was. Unlike most of the foam pillows we tested, this took days to air out.

Other than that, it performed comparably to the Coop pillows in terms of comfort in all sleep positions, thanks to its adjustability. But our testers found that the shredded-foam fill in this pillow harder to wrangle, as some of the bits were no bigger than a grain of rice. We weren’t able to confirm the company’s return and warranty policy, which isn’t promising for folks who find that this pillow doesn’t work for them.

Pros

  • Adjustable

  • Machine Washable

  • Affordable

Cons

  • Smelly for days after opening

  • Tiny fill shreds were difficult to remove

Product image of AmazonBasics Down Alternative Pillow Firm Density
Amazon Basics Firm Pillow

While testing pillows, we found that you get what you pay for. The AmazonBasics pillows are great for what they are, but they’re not as supportive as our top picks, don’t offer options for customizing fill, and in lab testing, retained some heat.

What they do bring to the table is a relatively low price that may make them worthwhile for certain scenarios. They're a fine option for folks who don't use pillows all the time, or who prefer to replace pillows more frequently. They may also work in guest rooms, or as fillings for decorative pillows.

The AmazonBasics pillows come in two densities: soft and firm. They’re filled with a polyester down alternative, but both our testers remarked they felt more like quilt batting than the puffy light sensation you’d want from something that’s supposed to mimic feathers.

The soft version fared fine for stomach sleeping, but our back sleeper was less impressed because it collapsed under her head, and didn’t provide sufficient support. Our side sleeper worried the firm version won’t be lofty enough to provide sufficient support to fill the space between the mattress and head for most side sleepers.

The pillows adhere to Amazon’s standard 30-day return policy, and a customer-service representative said the pillows can be returned even if the package is open, and regardless of condition.

Pros

  • Affordable

  • Little smell after opening

  • Machine washable

Cons

  • Insufficient loft

  • Didn’t capture down sensation

  • Retained heat

Product image of Tuft & Needle Original Foam Pillow
Tuft & Needle Pillow

Our side sleeper tester found the Tuft & Needle solid-foam pillow to be supportive with a nice surface springiness. It’s good height for many side sleepers, even though it was a skosh too tall for her preference. (It goes without saying that most stomach and back sleepers will find it too thick.)

While the foam insert can't be laundered, the pillow is encased in a washable microfiber cover. Microfiber covers tend to be tightly woven, which can provide extra protection for allergy sufferers, another added bonus of this pillow. (Though there's never harm in covering it with another encasement to be extra hygienic.)

Tuft & Needle offers a substantial 100-night trial if purchased from its site, or 30 days if bought through Amazon.

Pros

  • Supportive

  • Good for people with broad shoulders

  • Spongy and springy sensation

Cons

  • May be too thick for some

  • Foam doesn’t cradle

Product image of Tempur-Pedic TEMPUR-Cloud Breeze Dual Cooling Pillow
Tempur-Cloud Breeze Pillow

Though many of the pillows we tested claimed to have cooling properties, this was the only one that came through in the end. The pillow is made with a single piece of Tempur foam and infused with a cooling gel on both sides.

We can’t pin down exactly what that is—but if it works, it works. And our tester said this pillow really works. She thinks the pillow is a dream for hot sleepers.

But being cool comes at a cost. The Tempur-Cloud Dual Breeze is one of the most expensive pillows we tested. For people who wake up sweating and struggle to keep their temperature down at night, this pillow could be life-changing and worth the price.

For anyone who doesn’t, we’d say pass. That goes extra if you sleep on your back or stomach, as it’s too thick and firm for spinal alignment in those positions.

The cooling pillow has a thin, removable cotton cover, but the foam itself is spot clean only, leaving limited options for keeping it clean. The other major downside of all Tempur-Pedic pillows is the unforgiving return policy. Unlike most companies, which offer a trial period, Tempur-Pedic won’t take opened and used items back—you can’t sleep on it to decide if it’s for you.

Pros

  • Firm

  • Supportive

  • Cooling features that perform

Cons

  • Expensive

  • Limited washability

Product image of Nectar Memory Foam Pillow
Nectar Memory Foam Pillow

The Nectar pillow has a gusset that makes it, in theory, best for side sleepers. Unfortunately, it didn’t dazzle our tester. Like our top pick, it’s a shredded-foam fill pillow that may be adjusted for loft and texture. Whether you prefer a soft, medium, or firm pillow, you should be able to adjust it.

However, compared to similar pillows we tested, the Nectar arrived less stuffed straight from the package. While still firm, it lacked additional filling for anyone who prefers an extra-thick, ultra-firm pillow that’s brimming at the seams. It also isn’t fully washable—the removable cover can be machine-washed, but the insert holding the shredded foam can only be spot-cleaned.

The Nectar pillow has a 50-night trial period, giving you plenty of time to tinker with stuffing levels and decide whether it’s the best fit for you.

Pros

  • Adjustable fill

  • Comfortable

  • Versatile

Cons

  • Doesn’t match online advertising or appearance

  • No additional stuffing

Product image of MyPillow Giza Elegance
MyPillow Giza Elegance

In all three position tests, our testers found the MyPillow Giza Elegance inadequate in terms of the support. The only position that it kind of worked for was stomach sleeping—and that’s because some stomach sleepers, like our tester, can get by with no pillow at all. The filling was poorly distributed and compressed super easily. We feel that this won’t be satisfying or sufficient for most people.

Nonetheless, the pillow has a couple upsides. It was among the least odorous foam-filled pillows we tested. MyPillow offers a 30-night trial, but customers are saddled with a $9.99 return shipping cost if they decide it doesn’t rise to the occasion.

Pros

  • No smell

  • Machine washable

Cons

  • Lumpy and poorly distributed fill

  • Insufficient loft

  • Uncomfortable

Product image of Purple Pillow
Purple Pillow

The Purple Pillow is the mattress company’s original pillow model, made of their signature latex grid that is, yes, purple in color. The pillow comes with one larger piece of grid that is bolstered by two thinner (and also purple) foam sheets that can be removed so sleepers can adjust it to reach their optimal height. This offers some customization, though it’s less than shredded-foam pillows.

Our stomach sleeper and back sleeper testers found that, even without the boosters, the pillow was too tall and forced their necks upward into an uncomfortable position. Nonetheless, one Reviewed staff member (who generally prefers side sleeping) swears by the pillow.

The pillow didn’t smell, which is a plus, and the cover is machine-washable. Even the interior cushion can be washed with warm water and gentle soap.

If it piques your interest, the pillow has a 100-night sleep trial.

Pros

  • Latex material

  • Washable

Cons

  • Heavy

  • Not adjustable enough

  • Expensive

Product image of Room Essentials Plush Pillow
Target Room Essentials Plush Pillow

The Target Room Essentials Pillow was good for what it was—a low-priced, comfortable pillow. Our side-sleeping tester found it sufficiently supportive, but had reservations about the pillow’s longevity. In lab testing, the pillow took far longer than others to spring back to its original shape and fluffiness after being weighed down overnight. The fabric case also showed some signs of puckering following the heat test, a unique issue that we didn’t see with any of the other pillows we tested.

If you need something for temporary use or to serve as a fill for decorative pillows, this has a budget price and may be your best choice. The pillow falls under Target's standard 90-day return policy, but needs to be in unopened condition. It's a low-wager bet, but a bet nonetheless.

Pros

  • Affordable

  • Sufficiently comfortable

Cons

  • Lower quality

  • Insufficient loft

  • Questionable longevity

Product image of Purple Harmony Pillow
Purple Harmony Pillow

The Purple Harmony suffers the same problem as the Purple Pillow: It’s just too thick. This pillow, which is designed with side sleepers in mind, has a latex core sandwiched between two layers of Purple’s honeycomb grid.

Unlike the customizable layers of the Original, there’s no way to change its loft if you find it pushing your head up—our side-sleeping tester’s biggest complaint. She thought the pillow might accommodate people with very broad shoulders, or those who prefer to rest their head on something thick and very firm. But in the end, it wasn’t versatile or comfortable enough. Back and stomach sleepers should definitely avoid this one.

The company offers a 100-night sleep trial, so if you’re tempted by the color and design, you’ll be covered to give it a go.

Pros

  • Affordable

  • Good for people with broad shoulders

  • Machine washable

Cons

  • Thick

  • Little surface give

  • Expensive

Meet the tester

Lindsey Vickers

Lindsey Vickers

Senior Staff Writer, Sleep

@lindseyvix

Lindsey writes about sleep, lifestyle, and more for Reviewed. In her waking hours, she likes to spend time outside, read, cook, and bake. She holds a master’s in journalism from Boston University and bachelors' degrees in English Literature and Anthropology from the University of Utah.

See all of Lindsey Vickers's reviews

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