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Are Halloween trees a thing? Here's how to get the look

Show off for spooky season

Stock image of a Halloween tree with gnarled limbs and pumpkin basket decorations. Credit: Getty Images / Sarsmis

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Using nature to decorate is common for many U.S. holidays, namely pumpkins and cornucopias for Thanksgiving and pine trees for Christmas. Halloween decorations are just as notable though, with a range of “spooky” items like carved pumpkins and faux spider webs. If you’re wondering what a Halloween tree is, you’re not alone.

There is no archetype for a Hallow’s Eve tree; it can take different forms depending on what decorations you have on hand and whether you want to go to the backyard to find sticks and spiders. (We’re kidding!)

What is a Halloween tree?

A woman and a child happily decorate a Halloween tree.
Credit: Getty Images / monzenmachi

Halloween trees are a great way to get into the spirit of the increasingly popular holiday.

Halloween trees are plain fun. They help people who love the holiday celebrate and bring the late-fall spooky spirit inside. It often seems that people are either uninterested in Halloween or fully invested. You’d probably find a Halloween tree in the home of the latter group.

While the tree doesn’t have a religious or ancient significance, it can be fun to decorate and allows you to display more Halloween-themed items. Who doesn’t love that?

Interior designer and event specialist Raine Dearing says, “If you're the artificial tree type, this is a great way to prolong its use and enjoy it throughout more seasons. I love the idea of putting it up for Halloween, then redecorating to fit the fall and Thanksgiving theme, and then changing it over for Christmas.”

She also suggests changing it up for Valentine’s Day later in the following spring.

“Especially now that people are home more, either working from home or vacationing less, this is a great way to enjoy your holiday decorations for longer periods of time,” says Dearing.

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Where to find a Halloween tree

A split image of a black Halloween tree from Target and an orange Halloween tree from Walmart.
Credit: Reviewed / Target / Hyde & EEK! Boutique / Walmart / Vickerman

Target sells spooky bare branch trees, while Walmart has an array of Halloween trees.

“If you're going the artificial evergreen tree route, these can come from anywhere nowadays, like big name crafts stores, some hardware stores, and of course the ever-dominating Amazon. If you want the spookier bare branch look, Pottery Barn, West Elm, and Target have some good choices,” says Raine.

You can use your artificial tree as a Halloween tree if you’d like, which gives it more purpose and gets it out of storage a month or two earlier than normal.

Another option is to buy a Halloween-themed tree, which is orange, black, or purple, and may come with some decorations already attached.

You could also gather sticks and branches to create a tree that has a ragged or wispy appearance. If that’s too involved, you can find that type of tree online as well.

How to style your Halloween tree

Use colored lights

A close-up image of green string lights from Yuletime Inc.
Credit: Yuletime Inc.

Green, black, and orange are good hues when it comes to picking out string lights.

Colorful lights, like Christmas lights, are perfect for brightening your tree. You can use multicolored lights, but think of typical Halloween colors like black and orange for a more cohesive look. Pairing a black tree and white lights, like these from Walmart, creates a shadowy silhouette, or include green lights, like this strand by Yuletide, for a slimy, monstrous appearance. $5 at Walmart

$23 at Amazon

Add spooky decorations

A split image of a decked-out Halloween tree and a string of mini ghost garlands from Etsy.
Credit: Getty Images / Creative Photo Focus / Etsy / fuzzonme / Reviewed

Garlands, ribbons, and baubles can go on the tree, but keep it simple.

Halloween decorations range from candy corn to scary masks to skeletons. Use what you already have to make your tree unique, whether it be spider webs or a sheet to make it look like a ghost. There are many affordable decorations you can purchase online as well, like mini ghost garlands on Etsy and Day of the Dead skull ribbon from Walmart, or goth baubles.

$34 at Etsy

$5 at Walmart

$41 at Etsy

Other ideas include decorating your tree with Halloween-themed ornaments, like this shatter-proof stand from Amazon and adorably spooky bat cutouts from Etsy.

$20 at Amazon

$20 at Etsy

Raine recommended following the “less is more” approach with your Halloween tree.

“Concentrating on one or two spooky elements, but really playing them up can look good. There's a few I've seen out there that are full of cobwebs and some spiders that I really love, or it's a tree full of skulls! I enjoy seeing under the tree elements like painted pumpkins or headstones of the deceased.”

To finish the look, top your tree with something equally spooky, like a light-up ghost or a witch’s hat.

$14 at Amazon

$9 at Amazon

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