With its awesome induction burners, excellent convection baking performance, and a sale price that hovers around $1,500, the FGIF3061NF makes the most compelling case we've seen for upgrading from a traditional electric range to induction.
The FGIF3061NF's broiler reached our target temperature of 601°F in only 5 minutes–an excellent result, considering that some broilers take closer to 10 minutes. Preheat speeds were also nice and quick: The oven took only six minutes to reach 350°F in both standard and convection mode. The Quick Preheat setting shaved an additional minute off the preheat time.

The standard bake setting fared well in our tests, even slightly better than the convection setting in some instances. Cookies baked in the standard mode—while uniform overall—had a couple of burnt edges near the rear of the cavity. The bottoms of the cookies were also dark compared to the tops—nothing that a lightly colored cookie sheet won't solve. The convection setting resolved the overly dark cookie bottoms and burnt edges.

Cakes baked using the standard setting were remarkably consistent with very little difference between the tops and bottoms. Meanwhile, cakes baked with the convection setting were less overdone on the bottom, but were less evenly cooked.

It's what's inside that counts

Based on appearance alone, the understated FGIF3061NF is an unremarkable range. But you can't judge a book by it's cover and you can't judge an oven by it's boring exterior. Frigidiare has packed this appliance with enough features to keep cooking convenient.

Like nearly all Frigidaire appliances, this one features Smudge Proof stainless steel—a surface that's noticeably resistant to grime and grease, but consequently is a shade darker than most other stainless steel appliances. Keep that in mind if you plan to match it with your fridge and dishwasher.

Both oven and rangetop controls are found on the backsplash. Alongside the standard features like Bake, Broil, Roast, and the like, the FGIF3061NF has a One-Touch Keep Warm setting, an Auto Shut-Off mode, and a Sabbath mode. The oven also has a Quick Preheat setting, but for reasons detailed below in our Oven Performance section, it's not very useful.
The FGIF3061NF's four burners are all prime examples of why induction cooking is the future, each one excelled in our tests. The front right burner took only two minutes to boil six cups of water. The front left and rear left burners took three minutes and four minutes to boil the same amount of water respectively. Meanwhile, the right rear simmer burner took nine minutes.

When it came to temperature range the FGIF3061NF also excelled. We recorded a max temperature of 712°F from the right front burner, while the remaining burners averaged 691°F. Minimum temperatures were also (predictably) excellent. We recorded a minimum of 87°F from the simmer burner, with the remaining averaging 94°F.

Induction? Indeed!

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It's a forgone conclusion that induction rangetops excel in our tests. Magnetic coils provide direct heat to compatible pans, and allow cooks to boil in a flash and simmer at ultra-low temperatures. The FGIF3061NF is no exception: Three of the burners boiled six cups of water in under four minutes, and the front right burner did so in only two minutes.

Another benefit of induction cooking is the wide range of steady temperatures available. The burners averaged a maximum temperature of 691°F, which should make searing a piece of cake. We also recorded a minimum temperature of just 87°F from the front left burner, perfect for melting butter or chocolate.

Close to perfect

Even with its amazing burners, we had to thoroughly scrutinize the FGIF3061NF's oven. Preheat times were fast, but a few burnt edges marred our cookie test.

Both the broiler and the oven reached our target preheat temperatures quickly. The oven was particularly impressive: it took only 6 minutes to reach 350°F, and anything under 8 minutes is good in our book.

The FGIF3061NF does have a quick preheat setting, but it only shaved off a minute from the preheat time. Needless to say, unless that minute will make or break your cooking plans, you may as well stick with the standard preheat.

We did notice a few burnt edges on our test cookies when we baked without convection, a problem that was solved when we turned on the convection setting. The good news is that the oven baked cookies evenly across the cookie sheet, so there aren't any hot or cold spots here. We did notice some uneven baking with cakes—which could be the result of the convection fan slowly blowing liquid cake batter before baking it.

If you want to try induction, this Frigidaire is a good bet

If you're looking for a reasonably priced induction range, look no further than the Frirgidiare FGIF3061NF. Just like the similar Kenmore Elite 95073 you are unlikely to find a range that offers a better mix of performance, feature, and price.

The best news: We found the FGIF3061NF online for around $1,500. That makes it a great range and a great value, too.

Meet the testers

James Aitchison

James Aitchison

Staff Writer

@revieweddotcom

Aside from reviewing ovens and cooktops, James moonlights as an educational theatre practitioner, amateur home chef, and weekend DIY warrior.

See all of James Aitchison's reviews

Checking our work.

We use standardized and scientific testing methods to scrutinize every product and provide you with objectively accurate results. If you’ve found different results in your own research, email us and we’ll compare notes. If it looks substantial, we’ll gladly re-test a product to try and reproduce these results. After all, peer reviews are a critical part of any scientific process.

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