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  • Introduction

  • Front

  • Interior

  • Back

  • Sides

  • Ease of Access

  • Controls

  • Water Dispenser

  • Ice Maker

  • Cleaning

  • Noise

  • Other Features

  • Conclusion

Introduction

Front

Externally, the LFX31935 is almost identical to the LFX31925 we just tested last month.

This fridge is a large, imposing appliance that looks very elegant.

The 's horizontal-grain stainless does a poor job deflecting fingerprints, a fact that the cleaning staff in the LG booth did a good job hiding.

Fingerprints just won't give up the fight against stainless steel.

All controls are on the fridge's exterior, built in to the ice maker. Temperature readings glow only when you're changing their setting, which means your kitchen will be almost free from unsightly bright LEDs. The only difference between the control panels on the LFX31935 and LFX31925 is an addition of the Blast Chiller button. Press it once for one can, twice for two cans or one bottle. Hold it for three seconds to end the chilling process if you find yourself unable to wait five minutes for a cold beer.

We found this particular control to be a little touchy -- it doesn't give you very long to press the button a second time before the Blast Chiller starts working its magic.

While touch screen controls have proven finicky in the past, this one is quite responsive.

Handles are slightly curved, and the freezer drawer's handle angles upwards to make it easier to open.

The smooth, tapered handles also have to deal with fingerprints.

LG says their water and ice dispenser is angled to allow for filling up large vessels. If it's anything like the other LG refrigerators we've tested, you'll need to remember that when you're getting a simple glass of water, though, as it might spray a bit.

It looks almost futuristic, but the dispenser is actually quite easy to use.

The cavity allows you to rest your glass when getting ice, but you'll have to hold it when getting a drink of water.

Interior

Inside, the is almost identical to the LFX31925, with lightweight adjustable glass shelves. The main difference is that Blast Chiller, a special compartment for rapidly cooling beverages. We haven't had the chance to measure the true usable interior space, but we'll be sure to as soon as we can get one in the lab.

Blue LED lighting gives the spacious interior a cool, appetizing glow.

Lots of shelves and drawers offer versatile storage.

The Glide 'N Serve offers a temperature control drawer with minimal customization.

The crowning feature of this product is very easy to use and doesn't take up much room.

The slightly recessed water filter is quite easy to access.

The Slim Space Plus ice system takes up as little room as possible.

The door bins here are quite large, holding up to two gallons and four water bottles each.

The freezer drawer rolls out to reveal three trays where food can be stored. No wire baskets here -- your frozen dinners are treated to full-on plastic baskets.

The three sliding compartments create a rather spacious freezer drawer.

There's even a small storage compartment on the interior of the door.

The ice maker is built into the left fridge door, which means it doesn't take up room in the smaller freezer drawer.

The ice maker takes up very little space, but can still hold an impressive amount of ice.

Back

The was up against a wall, but we imagine the back looks somewhat like the rear of other LG fridges we've tested.

For all its features, there's just one water tube on the back.

Sides

Sides are gray, which helps the blend into a kitchen almost as well as a built-in.

Grey sides give the fridge a cohesive external finish.

Ease of Access

This fridge is best for those who store lots of fresh foods, as it's got an easily-accessible, large refrigerator compartment. If your idea of dinner is a box marked Swanson, this may not be the ideal fridge for you.

As far as noise and ease of cleaning are concerned, we'll have to wait to more thoroughly examine one of these fridges in our lab.

Controls

All controls are on the fridge's exterior, built in to the ice maker. Temperature readings glow only when you're changing their setting, which means your kitchen will be almost free from unsightly bright LEDs. The only difference between the control panels on the LFX31935 and LFX31925 is an addition of the Blast Chiller button. Press it once for one can, twice for two cans or one bottle. Hold it for three seconds to end the chilling process if you find yourself unable to wait five minutes for a cold beer.

We found this particular control to be a little touchy -- it doesn't give you very long to press the button a second time before the Blast Chiller starts working its magic.

All controls are on the exterior of the fridge. The flat buttons don't offer much feedback, but LG's Smart Diagnosis setup allows repair techs to remotely determine what's wrong with your fridge if it stops working.

While touch screen controls have proven finicky in the past, this one is quite responsive.

Water Dispenser

The same water dispenser as the LFX31925ST is on the front of the fridge.

It looks almost futuristic, but the dispenser is actually quite easy to use.

Ice Maker

The ice maker is built into the left fridge door, which means it doesn't take up room in the smaller freezer drawer.

The ice maker takes up very little space, but can still hold an impressive amount of ice.

Cleaning

Noise

The Blast Chiller actually made a pretty distinct whirr while it was working. How loud it gets will probably depend on what kind of beverage is in the compartment.

Other Features

The 's most distinguishing feature is its Blast Chiller, the world's first dedicated rapid beverage cooler. It's a small compartment that sits next to the deli drawer, beneath the crispers.

We got a demonstration of the technology, which LG claims can chill a can of cola or beer to 42 degrees in 5 minutes, and a bottle of wine in 8 minutes. It works by venting air from the fridge beneath into a small drawer that rocks cans and bottles back and forth to prevent the formation of ice crystals. We haven't tested the technology yet, but are looking forward to it.

Conclusion

Energy Efficiency

The improves on an already attractive fridge by adding a Blast Chiller -- a small compartment that can chill a beverage in under 5 minutes. That's a claim we're eager to test.

We have no idea how much energy the Blast Chiller adds, ad we can't comment on the LFX31935's performance, since we haven't had a chance to test on in our lab. If it's as similar to the LFX31925 on the inside as the outside, it'll probably be a solid fridge.

Meet the tester

Keith Barry

Keith Barry

Former Editor in Chief, Reviewed Home

@itskeithbarry

Keith was the Editor in Chief of Reviewed's appliance and automotive sites. His work has appeared in publications such as Wired, Car & Driver, and CityLab.

See all of Keith Barry's reviews

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