Editor's Note

The Vizio M-Series (2015) represents a fantastic value for big-screen buyers looking for maximum both screen size and performance without breaking the bank. While that would be laudable on its own, the M Series is also one of the most affordable ways to get a 4K TV in 2015 without sacrificing performance.

To put that to the test, we put the 65-inch version M Series through our rigorous lab testing to see exactly what it is capable of. As with most TV series, the performance between the 65-inch and the rest of the M Series should be very similar. As a result, all of our findings in the full review of the 65-inch set would apply here as well.

The 70-inch version is five inches larger, obviously, but it has the same look, feel, and user interface as all the rest of the M Series.

There are nine sizes in the Vizio M Series

Vizio's 2015 M Series features nine 4K televisions:

  • a 43-inch (model: M43-C1, MSRP $599)
  • a 49-inch (model: M49-C1, MSRP $769)
  • a 50-inch (model: M50-C1, MSRP $799)
  • a 55-inch (model: M55-C2, MSRP $949)
  • a 60-inch (model: M60-C3, MSRP $1,299)
  • a 65-inch (model: M65-C1, MSRP $1,699)
  • a 70-inch (model: M70-C3, MSRP $1,999)
  • a 75-inch (model: M75-C3, coming soon)
  • an 80-inch (model: M80-C3, MSRP $3,999)

Smart features, upscaling engines, processors, and HDMI ports are identical between models.

All of the M Series TVs have 32 local dimming zones except for the 43-inch, which has 28 zones. All of the M Series TVs use VA (Vertical Alignment) type LCD panels, except for the 49-inch, which uses IPS (In-Plane Switching). Sizes 55 inches and smaller use 60 Hz native refresh rates, while sizes 60 inches and larger use 120 Hz native refresh rates.

The M65-C1 model that we tested in our labs was received brand-new on loan from Vizio, and given roughly 16 hours of warm-up and break-in time prior to evaluation and review.

The Vizio M70-C3 has the same 32 active LED zones as the M65-C2. That means that you can expect excellent contrast ratio, with each zone able to dim or brighten independently depending on the content being displayed.

Because those LED elements are spread across a larger area, however, you might get a local dimming experience that is ever so slightly diminished. Chances are it will effectively be the same, though. Expect the same processing, 4K upscaling engine, color performance, etc. as the 65-inch that went through the rigors of our labs.

The other major difference between the 70-inch and the 65-inch? The larger screen makes it even more likely that you'll notice the difference between the M Series' 4K resolution and the 1080p high definition you may be used to. At typical seating distances, smaller screen sizes just aren't big enough to see pixel-level details like that, but at 70 inches it can really make a difference.

Beyond that, the biggest difference between the 70-inch and much of the rest of the M-Series is price. TV panels larger than 65 inches are notoriously difficult to produce, causing manufacturing costs to skyrocket. Those costs are, of course, reflected in retail prices. As a result, even though you can count on the price of the M70-C3 dropping over time, the price gap between it and the smaller versions will probably remain the same.

Meet the testers

Lee Neikirk

Lee Neikirk

Editor

@Koanshark

Lee has been Reviewed's point person for most television and home theater products since 2012. Lee received Level II certification in TV calibration from the Imaging Science Foundation in 2013. As Editor of the Home Theater vertical, Lee oversees reviews of TVs, monitors, soundbars, and Bluetooth speakers. He also reviews headphones, and has a background in music performance.

See all of Lee Neikirk's reviews
Lee Neikirk

Lee Neikirk

Editor

@Koanshark

Lee has been Reviewed's point person for most television and home theater products since 2012. Lee received Level II certification in TV calibration from the Imaging Science Foundation in 2013. As Editor of the Home Theater vertical, Lee oversees reviews of TVs, monitors, soundbars, and Bluetooth speakers. He also reviews headphones, and has a background in music performance.

See all of Lee Neikirk's reviews

Checking our work.

We use standardized and scientific testing methods to scrutinize every product and provide you with objectively accurate results. If you’ve found different results in your own research, email us and we’ll compare notes. If it looks substantial, we’ll gladly re-test a product to try and reproduce these results. After all, peer reviews are a critical part of any scientific process.

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