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Credit: Getti Images / kirisa99

The Best SD Cards of 2022

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Credit: Getti Images / kirisa99

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Editor's Choice Product image of SanDisk Extreme Pro 32GB (95 MB/s)
Best Overall

SanDisk Extreme Pro 32GB (95 MB/s)

The Extreme Pro delivers the snappy write speeds necessary for pro photography and comes in a variety of different storage capacities. Read More

Pros

  • Great performance results
  • Comes in various sizes
  • Lifetime warranty

Cons

  • None that we could find
2
Editor's Choice Product image of Transcend 32GB (90 MB/s)
Best Value

Transcend 32GB (90 MB/s)

Transcend’s SD card offers great performance for still photography, but you’ll have to look elsewhere for 4K video support. Read More

Pros

  • Impressive write speeds

Cons

  • Not ideal for video projects
3
Product image of Fujifilm Elite Performance 32GB (85 MB/s)

Fujifilm Elite Performance 32GB (85 MB/s)

The Fujifilm Elite offers pro performance and consistency at a very affordable price. If you’re taking a ton of photos, this is one to stock up on. Read More

Pros

  • Impressive write speeds
  • A great value for photographers

Cons

  • None that we could find
4
Product image of Lexar Professional 32GB (150 MB/s)

Lexar Professional 32GB (150 MB/s)

The Lexar Professional doesn’t stand out for its performance, but it comes in a multitude of sizes (from 16 GB to 256 GB) and can handle 4K video. Read More

Pros

  • Versatile and reliable
  • Great for 4K digital video

Cons

  • So-so write speeds
5
Product image of PNY Elite Performance 32GB (95 MB/s)

PNY Elite Performance 32GB (95 MB/s)

The PNY Elite performs with the best of them. It’s got 4K capabilities, it’s built to withstand wear and tear, and it has incredible storage capacity. Read More

Pros

  • Impressive performance
  • Extra storage space
  • Available in a 512-gig version

Cons

  • None that we could find

Physical memory cards might seem like antiquated technology in this day and age, but they’re still very much a relevant part of using gadgets. Whether you’re storing mounds of technical documents on a laptop or several gigabytes worth of photos snapped with a fancy digital camera, Secure Digital cards (commonly just referred to as SD cards) can facilitate in storing that data. And just like any other product, some perform better than others.

Editor's Note

The recommendations in this guide are based on thorough product and market research by our team of expert product reviewers. The picks are based on examining user reviews, product specifications, and, in some limited cases, our experience with the specific products named.

SanDisk Extreme Pro
Credit: Reviewed / Florence Ion
Best Overall
SanDisk Extreme Pro 32GB (95 MB/s)

The SanDisk Extreme Pro is not only a solid performer, but it offers the fastest write speeds among the batch of SD cards we tested, making it a prime choice for shooting photos in rapid succession, recording video, or adding some extra storage to your computer. The card is capable of transferring more than 30 megabits per second of data to full capacity in under 23 minutes, so you won’t have to wait around for files to move over. What’s more: This SD card is available in a variety of gigabyte sizes, not to mention SanDisk offers a lifetime warranty.

Pros

  • Great performance results

  • Comes in various sizes

  • Lifetime warranty

Cons

  • None that we could find

Transcend
Credit: Reviewed / Florence Ion
Best Value
Transcend 32GB (90 MB/s)

You don’t have to spend a ton of cash to get a fast-acting SD card. The 32GB Transcend SD card is nimble, as its write speeds are only seconds behind the SanDisk Extreme Pro. It can write to its full capacity in under 24 minutes. This particular card offers a U1 rating, however, so it's not capable of handling 4K video like the SanDisk's U3 rating.

The 32GB Transcend SD card is worth considering for its extremely affordable price point if you don't plan on recording high-resolution video, as it's nearly $10 cheaper compared to SanDisk’s offerings. This memory card is good for computers, digital cameras, and any other device that relies on a standard Class 10 UHS-I SD card.

Pros

  • Impressive write speeds

Cons

  • Not ideal for video projects

Product image of Fujifilm Elite Performance 32GB (85 MB/s)
Fujifilm Elite Performance 32GB (85 MB/s)

There's a reason that the Fujifilm name remains synonymous with photography. The 32GB Fujifilm Elite Performance SD card can keep the pace alongside the top SanDisk pick. Of the many cards we tested, the Fujifilm brand stayed consistent in its benchmark numbers, transferring over nearly 30GB of files in under 24 minutes. This SD card is just as capable when its embedded inside a DSLR or as external storage inside a laptop. Perhaps the only caveat is that it’s often on sale like SanDisk’s offerings, at which point you’ll have to ask yourself which brand you prefer.

Pros

  • Impressive write speeds

  • A great value for photographers

Cons

  • None that we could find

Product image of Lexar Professional 32GB (150 MB/s)
Lexar Professional 32GB (150 MB/s)

This Lexar Professional SD card uses the UHS-II specification, which means it’s capable with a particular batch of digital cameras and other high-performance devices. Even with its specification, however, the Lexar Professional isn’t any faster than our top pick from SanDisk. It came in fourth in our manual data writing tests.

Pros

  • Versatile and reliable

  • Great for 4K digital video

Cons

  • So-so write speeds

Product image of PNY Elite Performance 32GB (95 MB/s)
PNY Elite Performance 32GB (95 MB/s)

The PNY Elite Performance 32GB SD card is a real treat because it's an unexpected performer. If you’re in need of the physical storage space, it’s a worthy consideration.

The PNY Elite Performance card performed on par with the top picks. It also offers the most space out of all the SD cards we tested—about 29.8 GB. That’s incrementally more than what you’d get with the SanDisk Extreme Pro, which taps out at 29.7 GB. The number may seem minuscule in comparison, but if it’s a defining metric for you, then you’ll be happy to know that we found the PNY at a lower price than our budget pick from Transcend.

Pros

  • Impressive performance

  • Extra storage space

  • Available in a 512-gig version

Cons

  • None that we could find

Product image of Sony SF-32UY2 32GB (70 MB/s)
Sony SF-32UY2 32GB (70 MB/s)

Sony’s lineup of SD cards are still kicking strong, but its write speeds were much slower than our top five picks. In our benchmark tests, the 32GB Sony memory card took over 10 minutes to write a mere 10GB of test files. The numbers get slower from there: writing over 20 GB and 29 GB of data took almost half an hour and nearly 40 minutes, respectively. That’s just too much time to wait for data to move.

Product image of Kingston Canvas Select 32GB (80 MB/s)
Kingston Canvas Select 32GB (80 MB/s)

Kingston is relatively well-known in the world of PC hardware, but its SD card offerings shouldn’t be your first choice when you’re shopping online. The 32GB Kingston Canvas Select performed at a snail’s pace compared to our top performers. It took almost 45 minutes to transfer over 29GB of files, which is a long time. If you can afford a few dollars more, our budget SD card pick is a much better consideration than this one, and it'll cut your write times in half.

Product image of Toshiba 32GB (40 MB/s)
Toshiba 32GB (40 MB/s)

The 32GB Toshiba SD card is the slowest of the U1-rated memory cards that we tested. Not only does it offer the slowest write speeds—it took 48 minutes to move over 30GB of files—but it was also dead last in its read speeds measured with the USB Flash Speed tool. It took over half an hour to transfer 20GB of data, and about 48 minutes to load it up to full capacity. And while the card didn’t feel slow shooting inside a DSLR, there was a beat in between shooting a photo and seeing the preview.

What You Should Know About SD Cards

There are different classifications of SD cards, some of which are specially refined to work with certain kinds of media. For most of us, s Class 10, UHS-I, U1 card is enough for shooting RAW digital images and 1080p video. If you want to shoot 4K video, however, you'll want to look for SD cards with the U3 rating (like our top pick). You'll also see SD cards that fall under the UHS-II and UHS-III (coming soon) classification, which both offer maximum read and write speeds that can only be utilized by compatible hardware.

Credit: Reviewed / Getty Images

You can still use your UHS-II cards with UHS-I readers, as the pins on the first row of UHS-II cards allow it to fit in the same slots as UHS-I cards. However, you won't achieve the UHS-II's maximum speed.

Meet the tester

Florence Ion

Florence Ion

Contributing Writer

@Ohthatflo

Florence Ion is a freelance journalist and prolific podcaster. She's written for Ars Technica, PC World, Android Central, The Verge, and Engadget. Her reviews and how-tos can usually be found on Lifehacker, Tom's Guide, and Reviewed. She can also be heard weekly on All About Android on the TWiT network and Material on Relay FM.

See all of Florence Ion's reviews

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