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Close-up of the Nikon logo on a hefty DSLR camera. Credit: Reviewed

The Best Nikon DSLR Cameras of 2022

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Close-up of the Nikon logo on a hefty DSLR camera. Credit: Reviewed

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Editor's Choice Product image of Nikon D500
Best Overall

Nikon D500

The D500 is a professional-quality DSLR packed with features. It's easy to recommend for still photography, though less ideal if video is your focus. Read More

Pros

  • 10-fps burst shooting
  • Weathersealed
  • 4K video

Cons

  • None that we could find
2
Product image of Nikon Z 7

Nikon Z 7

Along with the slightly lower-end Z6, the Nikon Z7 is Nikon's first stab at a true professional-grade mirrorless camera. For Nikon, "professional grade" has a very specific meaning, and it's not something the company throws around lightly. Read More

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Great feel

Cons

  • None that we could find
3
Editor's Choice Product image of Nikon D810

Nikon D810

This Nikon DSLR is a dependable workhorse that excels at still photography, including high-speed sporting events. Read More

Pros

  • Works with a wide variety of Nikon lenses
  • High-speed shooting capabilities

Cons

  • None that we could find
4
Editor's Choice Product image of Nikon D4S

Nikon D4S

The Nikon D4S iterates on an already stellar professional-grade DSLR, adding higher dynamic range and other subtle improvements. Read More

Pros

  • Superb dynamic range and shooting speeds
  • Great autofocus and similar features
  • ISO setting of 409,600

Cons

  • None that we could find
5
Editor's Choice Product image of Nikon D7200

Nikon D7200

With weather sealing, a built-in autofocus motor, and some nifty video and timelapse features, the D7200 is a great choice for outdoor photography. Read More

Pros

  • Weatherproof
  • Autofocus motor
  • Solid video features

Cons

  • Lacks a full-frame sensor

There are two big players in the DSLR market: Canon and Nikon. These two titans compete for the hearts and minds of pros and amateurs alike, and each company puts out excellent cameras year after year. While it has frequently played second fiddle in sales, Nikon has always impressed us with its broad range of DSLRs—from the mighty D4S to the lowly D3300.

Editor's Note

The recommendations in this guide are based on thorough product and market research by our team of expert product reviewers. The picks are based on examining user reviews, product specifications, and, in some limited cases, our experience with the specific products named.

The Nikon D500 is the best Nikon DSLR camera
Credit: Reviewed / Kyle Looney

The Nikon D500 is the best Nikon DLSR we tested.

Best Overall
Nikon D500

Nikon's best-ever APS-C DSLR might be the best crop-sensor camera we've ever tried. With 4K video shooting, plenty of advanced features, and 10 FPS continuous bursts, Nikon's pulled out the stops in the D500, making this an exceptional pro DSLR. If you need speed (whether that's AF or burst speed), the D500 delivers for less than a third the price of the flagship D5. Read our full review of the Nikon D500.

Pros

  • 10-fps burst shooting

  • Weathersealed

  • 4K video

Cons

  • None that we could find

Product image of Nikon Z 7
Nikon Z7

Along with the slightly lower-end Z6, the Nikon Z7 is Nikon's first stab at a true professional-grade mirrorless camera. For Nikon, "professional grade" has a very specific meaning, and it's not something the company throws around lightly. Generally speaking, it's something Nikon reserves for only the very best cameras in its lineup, with previous full-frame models like the D610 notably falling short of the mark.

With the Z7, Nikon is finally coming around to the same conclusion as the rest of us: mirrorless designs are the future. The Z7 sheds the traditional mirror box that sits at the heart of DSLRs, resulting in a lighter, slimmer camera overall. The Z7 still feels like a Nikon camera in your hand, but with a more streamlined internal design everything can (and does) happen faster, with fewer steps, and fewer compromises.

The end result is perhaps the best camera body Nikon has ever made. Though long-standing Nikon enthusiasts will have to decide what to do with their existing gear—the Z system has a new lens mount and requires adapters to work with older F-mount lenses—Nikon already has enough support in the form of native Z lenses and adapters to make the switch relatively painless.

Pros

  • Lightweight

  • Great feel

Cons

  • None that we could find

Product image of Nikon D810
Nikon D810

For stills photographers who want a dependable, powerful, flexible camera, it's difficult to beat the D810. It takes incredible shots, works with almost any Nikon lens from the past 50 years, and is fast enough for all but the most demanding news and sports work. It's a superb camera in every way, and one of the best Nikon DSLRs we've tested. If you're looking to step up your skills, the D810 should be on your radar. Read our full review of the Nikon D810.

Pros

  • Works with a wide variety of Nikon lenses

  • High-speed shooting capabilities

Cons

  • None that we could find

Product image of Nikon D4S
Nikon D4S

The Nikon D4, launched back in 2012, was a revolutionary camera that combined fast burst shooting, superb ergonomics and control, and professional video options. As it has done with previous generations of pro DSLRs, Nikon followed it up with a subtle refresh, this time touting greater dynamic range, improved continuous shooting speed with autofocus, and a ludicrous top ISO of 409,600. Read our full review of the Nikon D4S..

Pros

  • Superb dynamic range and shooting speeds

  • Great autofocus and similar features

  • ISO setting of 409,600

Cons

  • None that we could find

Product image of Nikon D7200
Nikon D7200

With weather sealing, a built-in autofocus motor, and some nifty video and timelapse features, the D7200 is built with sports, wildlife, and even amateur prosumer photographers in mind. It may sit in a weird middle spot in Nikon's lineup, since it's around the same price as the full-frame D610, but for sports and wildlife photographers who don't need full-frame and want weather-sealing, the D7200 is a great choice. Read our full review of the Nikon D7200.

Pros

  • Weatherproof

  • Autofocus motor

  • Solid video features

Cons

  • Lacks a full-frame sensor

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