cameras

Canon PowerShot SD1100 IS Digital Camera Review

Read an expert, unbiased digital camera review of the Canon PowerShot SD1100 IS digital camera.

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Physical Tour

Front

The Canon PowerShot SD1100 looks a lot like its predecessor, except it comes in crazier colors. The one we reviewed is "Bohemian Brown." It has a glittery brown metal case that is smooth to the touch. There is a Canon logo on the left side, which is slightly pinched inward. The PowerShot SD1100 IS Digital Elph logo is also on the left side. On the right side is a large chrome circle that encloses the labeled Canon 3x optical zoom lens and nips the bottom of the flash, viewfinder, and autofocus assist beam near the top. The flash is in the upper right corner of the front – not a very smart placement, since the fingers wrap around the camera and block the flash light. To the flash’s left is the optical viewfinder, which is quite tiny. To its left is a small autofocus assist lamp and a tiny hole for the microphone.**

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Back

The SD1100’s back has a 2.5-inch LCD screen on its left side that looks small when compared to other slim competitors. Bigger seems to be popular for LCD screens lately, but at the same time, smaller bodies are trendier than ever, and the 2.5-inch LCD size works well with the dininuitive size of the SD1100. Above the LCD is a Canon logo and to its right is an optical viewfinder with two LED indicator lights next to it.

On the right edge of the camera’s back are a slew of controls. There are four peanut-shaped holes near the top that make up the speaker grill. In the upper right corner of the back is a matching peanut-shaped mode switch that moves from still shooting to movies to playback. There is also a print/share button nearby, with its central LED to differentiate it.

Just below the center of the right side is the flat multi-selector with a central Func./Set button. There are no tactile features like grooves or embossed arrows or anything on the ring around the button: it is smooth, flat, and labeled with printed text and icons. There are many icons crammed around the ring, which gives it a rather confused look.

The top of the multi-selector is labeled with a jump icon along with "ISO" text. The flash icon graces the right side, while the following three are jammed onto the bottom: self-timer, burst, and delete. On the left side, the Macro and Landscape focus modes are designated by their icons. At the very bottom are two round buttons labeled "DISP." for display on the left and menu on the right.

sd1100back.jpg

**Left Side

**The left side of the SD1100 is completely void of features. There is a central matte black panel surrounded by the Bohemian Brown metal. There are two screws holding the plates together, along with a few bumps so the camera can stand upward on this side without getting too scratched up.

 

leftsd1100.jpg

**Right Side

**The right side of the camera body has the same matte black/brown color design. There is a black cover at the top that pops out and reveals two tiny jacks for the AV-out and USB functions. In the center of the right side is a chrome wrist strap eyelet that protrudes ever-so-slightly from the camera body. The camera body’s overall shape on this side has been changed from its predecessor: the center is pinched in a bit so it looks like the front edge of the camera has an hourglass shape while the backside is flat.

sd1100right.jpg

Top

The top of the Canon PowerShot SD1100 IS has a flat chrome shutter release button on the right surrounded by a tiny zoom control ring. To its left is a small and recessed power button with an LED indicator just above it. On the left side, the camera is labeled "Image Stabilizer" and "AiAF."

top.jpg

Bottom

The bottom of the camera has a metal tripod socket centered under the LCD screen and lens. There are bumps in each corner of the bottom to keep the camera from scratching the tripod mount plate or table. On the left side is the battery compartment door that is extremely flimsy; it could be easily snapped off with rough handling. A small rubber cover inset into the door pops out so an optional power adapter can be threaded into it.

 

bottom.jpg
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Physical Tour
  2. Testing/Performance
  3. Components
  4. Design / Layout
  5. Modes
  6. Control Options
  7. Image Parameters
  8. Connectivity / Extras
  9. Overall Impressions
  10. Conclusion
  11. Sample Photos
  12. Specs / Ratings
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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