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Sony Alpha NEX-5R Review

Sony's newest mid-range NEX offers some of the series' best image quality.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Introduction

Home to some of the finest mirrorless cameras on the market, Sony's NEX series has been defined by thin bodies, oversized mounts, and a... well, we'll be charitable and say "growing" lens selection. Earlier this year, the company decided to complicate its lineup with a few new options, including the NEX-6 and the subject of this review, the NEX-5R (MSRP $649.99 body-only, $749.99 w/ kit lens), which replaces the 5N as the de facto midrange model.

While the 5R isn't equipped with some of the features found on more expensive NEX cameras, like an electronic viewfinder or dual command dials, the most important feature has been carried over: superb image quality.

Video Review

Design & Handing

Slightly awkward handling and poor grip are somewhat balanced out by a useful tilt screen.

Anyone who has used or even seen an NEX camera will immediately recognize the 5R as part of the group. The giant lens mount overlaps a thin body, and this iteration—for better or worse—features a touch screen, for use with features like touch shutter or tracking focus. Behind the almost comically large E-mount (which uses up every bit of the body's height) is a Sony-made APS-C image sensor (or "APS HD," if you prefer Sony's branding). This is a new design that offers 16.1 effective megapixels and features 99 phase detection autofocus points on the sensor—a capability that is largely unheard of in cameras of this class.

The omission of a viewfinder will probably be regarded as one of the camera's major flaws, but for many, the tilting rear touchscreen LCD will be a fully capable replacement in most circumstances. Initially we were very concerned about the panel's usability in bright sunlight, but a little menu-diving revealed a "Sunny Weather" setting for the LCD, which sets illumination to maximum and cranks up the contrast. The onscreen display is very responsive, so there's not much lag associated with framing action shots. Touch operation can be turned off completely if it's not your thing, but we found it to be pretty useful for accurate focusing on the spur of the moment.

Handling Photo 1

Ergonomic features on the front aren't very useful.

Handling-wise, NEX cameras have always been strange beasts, and the NEX-5R doesn't buck this trend.

Handling-wise, NEX cameras have always been strange beasts; their thin bodies are paired with chunky hand grips in a way that isn't exactly uncomfortable, but isn't anywhere near as nice as the worst DSLR. The NEX-5R doesn't buck this trend. On the front of the body you'll find the hand grip is covered with a dimpled, rubberized surface, but the material isn't actually very grippy. Still, we did appreciate the small protruding lip underneath the shutter release, which gives the middle finger some extra leverage.

Other issues interfere with the 5R's ergonomics, too. Not only does the neck strap get in the way during everyday use, but the rotating dial / directional pad is so high up toward the thumb rest that you'll find yourself accidentally striking it fairly often. The Function key, which opens up a handy quick menu, is frustratingly far away—up on top of the body, beside the shutter release. We also found ourselves regularly tapping the touchscreen LCD by accident, before finally switching this feature off entirely.

Performance

Huge dynamic range from the sensor and excellent sharpness from the kit lens result in gorgeous image quality.

While color accuracy is just mediocre, we were impressed by strong noise, resolution, and especially dynamic range performance.

Good news: it's all good news in this section. Sony's new sensor design not only outperforms the preceding NEX-5N by a decent margin, but actually gives the flagship NEX-7 a solid run for its money. While color accuracy is just mediocre, we were impressed by strong noise, resolution, and especially dynamic range performance. These are the kind of results you just can't get from a mirrorless body unless you're buying a NEX (or possibly a Pentax K-01).

The 18-55mm OSS kit lens is surprisingly sharp, given the poor performance we usually see from lenses of its type, and it's built like a tank, too. (Of course, it's also comically large on the tiny 5R body, but that's a gripe for another section.) It's sharpest at middle focal lengths and middle apertures, but falls off only slightly at full wide angle or full telephoto.

The sensor is similarly impressive. Color accuracy is probably its worst trait, as it turns in an uncorrected color error of 2.74 in our standardized X-Rite Color Checker test. That's not a bad score at all, but it's about 0.5 off of what the best consumer cameras typically manage. Noise control is admirable, though there's no way to actually turn noise reduction full off when shooting JPEGs. Your options are Low and Auto, the latter of which applies a lot more smoothing above ISO 1600. Results generally look pretty pleasing, but if you have a noise reduction phobia, we strongly suggest shooting RAW.

Sony's APS-C sensors have always been known for their superb dynamic range, and the 5R's new unit continues that proud tradition. The really impressive thing is that it manages to hang onto this DR all the way up through ISO 1600, before declining steadily at higher sensitivities. This means that you should be able to capture rich, lifelike landscapes and sunrise/sunset shots without clipping highlights or losing shadows. Remember to shoot RAW if you want the best dynamic range possible!

Features

Remember all those features you liked on the 5N? Get ready to pay extra for them on the 5R's app store.

It's a good thing the core performance of the NEX-5R impressed us, because new features like Wi-Fi and installable apps certainly didn't. At this early stage, the borderline-exploitative "PlayMemories" apps seem to be repackaged for-pay versions of previously-free features. Wi-Fi, meanwhile, is mainly used as a way to facilitate the use of this ridiculous "feature."

The borderline-exploitative "PlayMemories" apps seem to be repackaged for-pay versions of previously-free features.

The PlayMemories branding is a callback to the company's video and photo sharing application on Playstation 3. In its current form, the feature cannibalizes existing in-camera features, and relocates them into a separate, slower section of the interface. In theory this will let the 5R grow and improve as appealing new apps are released. In reality, at least for now, the only advantage is Sony's alone, it gets to charge $4.99 for features like Multi-shot Noise Reduction, which used to be in-camera for free.

If you've seen the new TV spot for the NEX-5R, the one with Taylor Swift, then you know that Sony's tagline for this product is "DSLR quality. Wi-Fi convenience." This camera certainly produces shots of DSLR quality, but make no mistake: Wi-Fi is not convenient. Not for a camera anyway. Of course, there's nothing wrong with Taylor Swift (she seems like a very nice young lady), but could somebody please Tell Me Why the industry keeps pursuing this sideshow tech? Wi-Fi offers few advantages over simply transferring your files with a memory card, unless you absolutely need to get your photos onto Facebook within the next five minutes. If that's the case, may we suggest a reorganization of your priorities.

Conclusion

Sony is marketing the 5R as an entry-level camera, but the image quality doesn't lie—this thing is a beast.

It's almost like Sony doesn't want to sell NEX-7s anymore. Apart from a few key missing features—the built-in viewfinder, Tri-Navi control setup, and higher-res sensor—the NEX-5R not only surpasses its predecessor, but competes directly with the top of the NEX lineup.

It's almost like Sony doesn't want to sell NEX-7s anymore.

What really makes the 5R stand out is also what's most important: performance. By most metrics, the 5R either surpasses the NEX-7—and, by extension, the majority of similarly priced system cameras—or comes very close. Color accuracy was a slight disappointment, but noise, sharpness, and white balance have all been upgraded over NEX-7 and 5N. The 5R even offers better dynamic range than the 7, which is camera known for its DR performance. Sony's consistent respect for videography is also untarnished. Clips shot with the NEX-5R are smooth and sharp, and the new sensor is nearly twice as sensitive in low light as the 5N's.

Our complaints about the NEX-5R largely revolve around usability and features. This series has never had intuitive menus, and the 5R's interface certainly doesn't show any improvement. In fact, the menu system is arguably more confusing than past models thanks to the presence of installable "PlayMemories" apps, which relocate features like picture effects and remote control options into a separate menu. This is a feature that seems intended to make Sony extra money, not to help photographers.

Still, at only $750 with a great kit lens, the NEX-5R is a rather remarkable value. While the most heavily publicized features (picture effects, self-portrait LCD, Wi-Fi uploading to Facebook) might paint this camera as an entry-level model, the hardware and performance lean more toward the high end. On top of the mount's ready acceptance of legacy lenses, Sony has announced plans to expand the E-mount lens family this year (cross your fingers), making the 5R is an easy recommendation as a first system camera, a toy for enthusiasts to dabble with, or even an inexpensive backup for pros.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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