Cameras

Heterodyne Light Field Camera Photo Gallery

Read about Mitsubishi Electric's latest technology, a heterodyne light field camera that uses a coded masked aperture to refocus images after capture.

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[gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/NEWS IMAGES/2007 April News Photos/Ramesh Feature/Ramesh-Amit-talk-LG.jpg' thumb='' caption='Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs (MERL) scientists Ramesh Raskar (left) and Amit Agrawal demonstrate how to use a heterodyne light field prototype, a modified digital camera that can refocus blurry photos after capture. The technology could save photos that suffer from auto focus inaccuracy. (Photo/Karen M. Cheung).']

[gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/NEWS IMAGES/2007 April News Photos/Ramesh Feature/4D-light-slide-LG.jpg' thumb='' caption='The heterodyne light field camera uses a modified lens that fits a disc-like "mask" between the lens and the camera sensor. The mask is imprinted with a special coded aperture pattern. (Photo/Karen M. Cheung).'] [gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/NEWS IMAGES/2007 April News Photos/Ramesh Feature/4D-light-side-LG.jpg' thumb='' caption='Using the masked aperture, a user could make a blurry photo clear. (Photo/Karen M. Cheung).']

[gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/NEWS IMAGES/2007 April News Photos/graphic2.jpg' thumb='' caption='The diagram depicts the construction of the heterodyne light field camera. According to the researchers, the specialized camera could be made from existing cameras. No additional optical components were required in making of the prototype. (Illustration/MERL).']

[gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/NEWS IMAGES/2007 April News Photos/Ramesh Feature/4D-transparency-LG.jpg' thumb='' caption='The mask is made up ordinary transparency paper with a specific patterned code. Described as a "crossword puzzle," the coded aperture allows scientists to recover a 4D light field in post-processing. (Photo/Karen M. Cheung).']

[gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/NEWS IMAGES/2007 April News Photos/Ramesh Feature/Ramesh-Beal.jpg' thumb='' caption='The photo on the left is the blurred capture image with the focus set on the background. After processing the image through an inverse computation of the Fourier transform equation, MERL scientists could recapture focus on the face, and not the background. (Photo/MERL).']

[gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/NEWS IMAGES/2007 April News Photos/Ramesh Feature/Ramesh-compare-G.jpg' thumb='' caption='MERL researchers say that coded aperture can refocus photos, not just sharpen them the way that editing software like Photoshop does. Left: Unfocused Photo; Middle: Sharpened with Photoshop; Right: Refocused with coded aperture. (Photo/MERL).']

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[gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/photogallery/2007 April /Ramesh Fence-LG.jpg' thumb='' caption='Another example. (Photo/MERL).']

[gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/photogallery/2007 April /Ramesh Renaissance.jpg' thumb='' caption='Another example. (Photo/MERL).']

[gallery image='http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/NEWS IMAGES/2007 April News Photos/Ramesh Feature/Ramesh-Amit-LG.jpg' thumb='' caption='MERL scientists Ramesh Raskar and Amit Agrawal display the heterodyne light field camera. The paper on the technology will be published in July and presented at the 2007 Siggraph Conference, an international computer graphics convention. (Photo/Karen M. Cheung).']

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