• Linenspa All-Season Down Alternative Quilted Comforter

  • The Company Store Legends Hotel Alberta Down Comforter (Medium)

  • How We Tested

  • What You Should Know About Comforters

  • Other Comforters We Tested

  • More Articles You Might Enjoy

Our Favorite Comforters of 2021

  1. Best Overall

    Linenspa All-Season Down Alternative Quilted Comforter

    Pros

    • Soft microfiber exterior

    • Affordable

    • Not prone to staining

    Cons

    • Color doesn't match online image

    • Low quality stitching

    Skip to the full review below
  2. Best Down

    The Company Store Legends Hotel Alberta Down Comforter (Medium)

    Pros

    • Silky exterior

    • Different warmth levels

    • Machine washable

    Cons

    • Not the softest exterior

    • Expensive

    Skip to the full review below
Linen Spa
Credit: Reviewed / Camryn Rabideau

Don’t worry about getting the Linenspa comforter dirty—stains come out quite easily with a little bit of scrubbing, and you can always throw it in the washing machine for a more thorough wash.

Best Overall
Linenspa All-Season Down Alternative Quilted Comforter

It might seem a little strange that the least expensive comforter in our test beat out its competitors, especially when several cost more than 10 times as much—we were surprised, too. But our testing scores don’t lie. The Linenspa Comforter edged out the other comforters in a few key areas to be named our Best Overall.

The comforter is incredibly warm, filled with a hypoallergenic down alternative that stays in place within its baffle-box construction. We also found the Linenspa blanket was easy to remove stains from—they came out quickly with minimal scrubbing. And it’s machine-washable, emerging wrinkle- and clump-free from the machines.

In addition, the Linenspa blanket has a brushed microfiber exterior, which is velvety soft and feels great to sleep under even without a duvet cover. In comparison, many of the other comforters we tested, including our "Best Down" pick from The Company Store, are a little bit rough to the touch.

Where the Linenspa lacks, however, is its stitching quality—after looking closely, we noticed some loose threads along the seams from the get-go—so its longevity could be questionable. But at its current price, replacing it every few years would still cost you less than some of our other picks (and semi-frequent replacement is good for your bedding hygiene, anyway). Another small downside of this budget-friendly comforter is that, to my eye, the color doesn’t match what is shown online. In real life, the gray has a noticeably blue undertone, while it looks more neutral in its online pictures.

The Linenspa Comforter is available from Twin XL to California King size, and in several basic colors and patterns. With the exception of the white option, these comforters are two-toned and reversible, giving you two styling options. If you don’t like the comforter’s color (or are annoyed like I was that it didn’t arrive true to the color online), you can choose to put a duvet cover on it, which stays in place by fastening the eight loops (four on the corners and four at the midpoint of each side) with a compatible duvet that has interior ties. When it comes to bang for the buck, the Linenspa is first-rate.

Pros

  • Soft microfiber exterior

  • Affordable

  • Not prone to staining

Cons

  • Color doesn't match online image

  • Low quality stitching

Best Luxury
Credit: Reviewed / Camryn Rabideau

This comforter from The Company Store comes in light warmth, medium warmth, and extra warmth options—we opted to test the medium warmth version as a middle ground.

Best Down
The Company Store Legends Hotel Alberta Down Comforter (Medium)

If you want to feel like you’re sleeping under a luxurious cloud, look no further than The Company Store's Legends Hotel Alberta Comforter. This high-end down blanket’s lofty fill makes it feel comfortable and luxurious, and while it’s expensive we tested, we think it’s worth every penny.

This comforter from The Company Store is available in light warmth, medium warmth, and extra warmth—we opted to test the middle-ground, medium-warmth version. The exterior of the blanket is a combed cotton sateen, a good quality fabric, and the interior is filled with 600 fill power duck down, which means it has a moderate amount of loft and warmth, so it's cushy when you snuggle into it and good for someone who needs a comforter with more warmth than a lightweight blanket but less warmth than one for frigid temperatures. It kept my partner and me at a comfortable temperature on cool fall nights—it felt like it would be ideal for all-season use, as it’s not too heavy or too light. Plus, the baffle-box construction helps to keep the fill evenly distributed.

The only complaint I had about the construction of the Hotel Alberta Comforter is that its fabric isn’t rough, but it wasn’t the softest, either. However, you can (and should) use duvet covers, and this comforter comes with corner loops to help keep covers in place, as long as it's got the corresponding interior ties.

The comforter’s fabric is somewhat prone to wrinkles, which could mean that it looks less than prime if you decide to stow it away during warmer months. It does a great job repelling liquids, but should it get dirty, the comforter is also machine-washable, which is rare for down-filled options. Overall, we think just about anyone would be happy with this high-end blanket assuming they want to ante up the cash, especially as it comes in a variety of warmth options and standard bed sizes.

Pros

  • Silky exterior

  • Different warmth levels

  • Machine washable

Cons

  • Not the softest exterior

  • Expensive

Related content

How We Tested

The Tester

I’m Camryn Rabideau, a freelance contributor here at Reviewed. After I tested and reviewed the best sheet sets, it was a natural progression to move on to comforters. (More sleeping for work—score!) I usually spring for comforters based on looks alone, so I was curious to see if high-quality bedding was really that much better than what I usually buy at the discount store.

The Tests

I put each of these comforters through the wringer to see how well they performed in a few key areas.

First, and perhaps most importantly, were the sleep tests. I took a one-hour nap on my queen-size bed under each blanket, then slept under them overnight. During each sleep test, I evaluated whether the comforter kept me warm, how soft it felt (both in terms of loft and how the outer material felt to touch), and whether it rustled or crinkled (and how loudly) when I rolled over.

Next, I evaluated how easy each comforter was to wash. I stained them with fruit juice, food, and Diet Coke, then attempted to spot-clean them with regular All Free + Clear detergent—no pre-treating or stain removers. Following the spot-clean, I followed tag instructions and laundered the comforters that were washing-machine-friendly. Those that were dry-clean-only were just spot-cleaned.

Finally, I used my background in textile science—who knew that my education in textiles and fashion merchandising would help me as a freelancer for Reviewed?—to assess the overall construction of the comforter, determining whether it would stand up to years of use. I also considered how easy or hard it would be to store each one, based on how much space it took up when folded, and even if it withstood wrinkling.

What You Should Know About Comforters

baffle box construction
Credit: The Company Store

Baffle box construction helps keep fill well distributed, and is thought to make blankets more uniformly warm.

Comforters can be surprisingly complex. With phrases like fill power and thread count, it's easy to get lost in the terminology. Feeling overwhelmed? Don't worry—from insulation materials, to duvet and comforter weight—we're here to guide you every step of the way.

Should I Get a Duvet or a Comforter?

The first thing you should decide is if you want a “duvet” or a “comforter.” “Duvet” is the French word for down, and as you might assume, it’s generally used to describe down-filled blankets. Duvets, which can also be called “duvet inserts,” are often white or a plain, solid color. It’s generally recommended you use them with a duvet cover or a protective fabric casing, much like a gigantic pillowcase, that will keep the often dry-clean-only insert cleaner, and also makes your blanket more decorative as the fabric can be any color or pattern and can be changed at your whim. These covers go on like big pillowcases and come in sizes that match your mattress, but some have ties inside that correspond with small loops around the perimeter of the comforter, which will keep the cover from shifting or bunching. They come in a variety of fabrics, ranging from faux fur to fleece to cotton—and sizes that match your mattress, including twin XL, and king (full and queen are usually lumped together and labeled as "full/queen"). Comforters, in contrast, are a single unit—the fill and fabric can’t be separated, and they’re not designed to be used with a changeable cover (though there’s no rule that you can’t do that).

A comforter’s exterior fabric may be solid-colored or patterned, and you’ve probably seen them in the “bed-in-a-box” sets at Target and other major stores. Often, comforters are filled with synthetic fill rather than down or feathers, but not always, and they tend to be less expensive than duvets, especially when you factor in the cost of the duvet cover as well. To make things more complicated, down-filled blankets are sometimes called comforters, though comforters are seldom called duvets. If you know you want a certain type of fill, consider shopping for that specifically.

How Warm Should My Comforter Be?

Another thing to consider is comforter or duvet “weight,” which most often refers to the warmth you can expect from it rather than how heavy it will feel on your body. Bedding packaging may use the terms “weight” or “season” to describe how warm the blanket is. A “lightweight” comforter, sometimes called “summer weight” is great for those who don’t need much extra insulation, while a “heavyweight” one, naturally, will be much warmer, for those who run cold or who sleep in chilly rooms. Most people will be happy with a “midweight” option. There are also duvets and comforters that purport to have “cooling” properties to dispel excess body heat for warmer climates or those who tend to run hot, but we didn’t specifically test those. The insulating fill inside comforters is most often natural goose or duck down (or down and feathers) or down alternative (typically polyester or a polyester blend). Less commonly, fills can be all cotton, wool, or silk. If you're allergic to down, you may want to opt for a down-alternative comforter with a hypoallergenic microfiber cover.

What is Fill Power?

Down, sometimes also referred to as down clusters, serves as insulation and is measured in fill power. Fill power is a term that’s specific to down products that are made to insulate—in addition to comforters, you may see it on down-filled jackets or vests. Fill power is a measure of the down’s loft or fluffiness. It’s assessed by taking one ounce of loft (or the stuffing itself) and measuring how many cubic inches of space it fills. Higher fill powers generally indicate better quality down that will be warmer relative to its physical weight and more resilient to the test of time. A higher fill power will also likely make a blanket feel warmer, as it correlates to a fluffier blanket that can trap in more body heat, but it’s not something you can measure in degree increments. It’s best used as a proxy for general warmth or the down’s quality. For example, 600 to 700 is considered middle-of-the-road in terms of warmth and quality, according to our apparel writer and textile expert, Jamie Ueda. Items made with 700-plus fill power down are considered warmer, and generally have a price tag that reflects their quality, she says. All that said, not all duvet manufacturers label their products’ fill power, and it shouldn’t be a make-or-break factor when choosing your next duvet.

What is Down-Alternative Fill?

Down-alternative fills are made from a synthetic material, most often polyester or rayon, and are designed to mimic the fluffiness of down clusters. Usually, down alternative does not feel as luxurious as real down because it’s not as fluffy and squishy with that cloud-like feeling, though that depends on how it’s made. Some alternatives are made more closely resemble down clusters more than others in how fluffy they feel and the warmth level they provide. Down alternative fills are generally cheaper than the natural stuff and most do not require dry cleaning as they’re made of synthetic materials. These are also a good option for allergy sufferers, because they can be laundered to control dust more easily.

Other Terms You Might See When Shopping for Comforters

Baffle-box construction preserves the puffy integrity of a fluff-filled blanket with narrow strips of fabric sewn inside the comforter perpendicular to the outer fabric, segregating the fill into three-dimensional square compartments. These "baffle boxes" help keep the down or alternative fill evenly distributed throughout the comforter so all the filling doesn't migrate to one side or area. Because the box construction adds more dimension, these comforters are loftier and generally warmer than ones made with sewn-through construction (more below). These also tend to be pricier than other comforters due to their complexity.

Sewn-through construction is when stitching is “sewn through” the comforter to create borders that hold the fill typically within a grid, though the stitching can be done in basically any shape or design. Like baffle boxes, sewn-through construction helps keep the contents evenly distributed so it doesn’t shift to other areas of the comforter. Sewn-through comforters are often less expensive compared to baffle-box comforters but are considered less warm because the stitching cuts through the fill, pushing it off to either side of the seams, making it possible for the blanket to feel colder in areas, namely along the stitching, where there’s no loft to hold in heat. On the other hand, this type of construction may be preferable for someone that sleeps hot.

Thread count refers to the number of vertical and horizontal threads per square inch of fabric. In the case of comforters, it refers to the outer fabric that contains the fill. People often assume that higher thread counts equate to better quality products. It’s true that you don’t want a low thread count comforter or duvet (say, under 200), but excessively high thread counts, like 800-plus, can make for a stiff fabric and steep price. You’re best off looking for something that’s reasonable, likely between 300 and 600—and trusting your fingers to determine if you like how it feels. For feather and down duvets especially, a thread count in that range should help prevent rogue fluff or feather shafts from poking through.

Other Comforters We Tested

Tuft & Needle Down Duvet Insert

If you love super lofty blankets, the Tuft & Needle Down Duvet Insert will feel like heaven to you. The blanket is filled with 650 fill power North American down (which it claims is “humanely sourced,” meaning the geese are kept in certain conditions, and the gathering of down follows specific standards). It offered a pillowy, toasty sensation that kept me warm during testing, even on the coldest winter nights.

The shell doesn’t absorb liquid readily—in fact, soda and juice beaded up on the surface during our stain testing. We managed to rub the liquid in to create stains, and they both came out easily when we put the blanket through the wash—an added bonus.

This insert has a breathable, 300 thread count all-cotton shell with gray piping around the edges. It isn’t the softest fabric ever, but it wasn’t unpleasant. Another thing to note is that the queen-sized duvet is 98 by 98 inches—normal queen size duvets measure 88 by 90 inches—purposefully oversized to prevent a partner from blanket-hogging, and give you more fabric to curl up in. However, this may result in your duvet cover not fitting properly, or the duvet draping excessively over the sides of your bed. But in my eyes, the oversized design and warm, lofty fill, made this blanket stand out in the best way possible.

The only downsides are its high price—it’s among the most expensive comforters we tested at $275—and greater propensity for wrinkling than some of the others we tested. The blanket performed well on all our tests, it just didn’t excel in any area, which is why it’s not our top pick.

Pros

  • Lofty

  • Warm

  • Doesn't readily absorb liquid

Cons

  • Expensive

  • Oversized and may be too big for some beds

  • Some wrinkling

Pottery Barn Supreme Goose Down Duvet Insert

The Pottery Barn Supreme Goose Down Comforter is very similar to the Alberta Euro Down Comforter from The Company Store in construction and performance. This blanket sports a 300 thread count cotton shell containing 650 fill power European white down. The baffle-box stitching keeps the fill distributed and in place, and I enjoyed sleeping under it, finding it both lofty and cozy. The exterior fabric wasn’t the softest to touch, so you’ll want a duvet cover for more than just cleanliness, in this case.

This Pottery Barn comforter repelled liquids and stains came out easily. You can machine-wash and dry it, assuming your washer and dryer are large enough. And though it retained some wrinkles after being bunched up in our testing, they weren’t too bad.

Pros

  • Good weight

  • Comfortable temperature

  • Baffle box stitching

Cons

  • Slightly rough fabric

  • Minor wrinkling

  • Expensive

Brooklinen Down Comforter

Despite being the lightweight option, the Brooklinen Down Comforter proved lofty and warm, even on a particularly cold night—likely due to its 650 fill power down, which is comparable to other “midweight” options we tested. The temperature in our apartment got down to the low 60s, yet I was pleasantly warm underneath this blanket, which also comes in “All-Season” and “Ultra-Warm” versions.

This duvet has a down-cluster fill, which provides that delightful plush feeling. The blanket is also treated with “Ultra-Fresh Antimicrobials,” to prevent bacterial growth, according to Brooklinen. According to a customer service rep, the blanket has a 400 thread count cotton sateen shell. I found the fabric doesn’t readily soak up liquids and was easy to lift stains from. I was disappointed, however, that the fabric didn’t feel very soft, especially as Brooklinen’s 480 thread count sateen sheets are my favorite set.

Pros

  • Warm

  • Plush

  • Doesn't readily absorb liquid

Cons

  • Rough fabric

  • Expensive

Buffy Comforter

If you’ve come across an ad for Buffy’s Cloud comforter, you probably know the brand’s marketing team calls it the “The Earth’s Comfiest Comforter.” That’s a pretty bold claim, but I was pleasantly surprised at what this product had to offer. I enjoyed sleeping under this blanket—in my testing notes I wrote, “It’s so, so soft and fluffy, yet very light. I was the perfect temperature all night.” (I’m only now noticing that could be a poem…)

The other perks that make me like this comforter have nothing to do with the product’s performance, so much as the company’s ethics and practices. For one, Buffy comforter uses about 50 recycled bottles per queen-size comforter in making its down-alternative fill. Plus, Buffy claims its fabric, made from easy-to-grow eucalyptus fiber and then processed into lyocell, is resistant to allergens, including dust mites and mold (not because of the eucalyptus fiber itself, but due to the processing during which it’s turned into a semi-synthetic fabric).

There are a few downsides to this product that kept it from clinching a top spot. For one, it relies on sewn-through stitching to keep fill distributed, but I think that, with time, there’s a good chance you’d wind up with a lopsided blanket because there is not a lot of sewn-through stitching to keep the fill in place. Plus, that fancy recycled fabric gets pretty wrinkled, and my test Diet Coke stain was hard to remove. You can’t launder the Buffy Cloud in the washer, which is a bummer if you’re opposed to having your comforters dry-cleaned, like I am.

If you’re looking for a down-alternative comforter that’s lightweight, warm, and more environmentally conscious, I would suggest considering Buffy.

Pros

  • Comfortable temperature

  • Eco-friendly materials

  • Lightweight

Cons

  • No baffle box stitching

  • Prone to staining

Lands' End Essential Down Comforter

This comforter isn’t anything to behold—it looks like every other down comforter out there, which is partially why it didn’t score higher. It’s fabric was average in terms of softness, and the 550 fill power stuffing, composed of 75% down and 25% feathers, makes it warm to sleep under—I can imagine it would be great for cold winter nights. The Lands’ End Essential down comforter is machine-washable, saving you from having to drag it to the dry cleaner. It features that baffle box-stitching we love to keep the down and feathers evenly dispersed.

The downsides mostly come with the outer fabric. I found that stains don’t come out of this comforter readily, and it’s also prone to wrinkling, which to me looks unsightly. Still, both of those issues could be remedied with a duvet cover, which can be attached to the insert using the corner anchors.

Pros

  • Machine washable

  • Baffle box stitching

  • Soft

Cons

  • Easily stained

  • Prone to wrinkling

  • Expensive

L.L. Bean Ultrasoft Cotton Comforter

Despite its name, the L.L. Bean Ultrasoft Cotton Comforter fell squarely in the middle of the pack when it came to softness. I didn’t think the fabric was scratchy, but it also wasn’t one I wanted to burrito myself up in. That said, it kept me warm throughout the night with its polyester fiberfill and feels relatively lightweight. It also repels liquids fairly well.

The sewn-through stitching is a lot smaller than that on other products, making the whole blanket a less puffy option, but also keeping the fill very evenly dispersed. The comforter was also among the more noisy ones I slept under, rustling up a storm when my partner or I shifted around during the night. As it’s not designed to be used with a duvet cover this is a consideration—especially for folks who are active sleepers. I found the cream color of my test blanket off-putting (a personal preference, of course), but there are several other colors available.

Pros

  • Keeps you warm

  • Repels liquids

  • Several color options

Cons

  • Doesn't repel liquids well

  • Less puffy

  • Noisy

Purple Duvet

When I saw the tiny box that the Purple Duvet arrived in, I fully expected to be cold sleeping under it—even after unfurling and fluffing, it’s one of the thinnest comforters on this list. That’s why I was pleasantly surprised that it kept me delightfully warm, even on a cold New England winter night. At one point I even got too hot and had to stick my leg out for a minute to cool back down.

While we tested the All-Season version of this comforter, it’s also available in a lightweight model that’s ideal for summertime. Both options have a knit cover that’s 100% cotton, and “hypoallergenic” polyester fill inside, and they’re sewn with a to keep the filling in place. The exterior fabric is nice to the touch, but I was surprised to discover that the duvet is dry-clean only. Most blankets with polyester fill can go in the washing machine, so this was puzzling, but the good news is that in my testing stains came out easily by hand with minimal scrubbing.

The other negative I found with the Purple Duvet was that, after just a few days of testing, one line of stitching was already starting to fray. This doesn’t bode well for the longevity of the blanket, so while it performed well overall, it’s not a top pick.

Pros

  • Slim profile

  • Warm

Cons

  • Quickly frayed

  • Dry-clean-only

Leesa Duvet Insert

A lot of duvet inserts have somewhat rough fabric shells, which is no big deal if you’re going to use a duvet cover, but can be a bummer if you want to sleep using just the duvet itself. I’m happy to say the Leesa duvet insert did not join the ranks. It’s one of a few options with an exterior, made of organic cotton sateen, that’s so soft that I just wanted to rub my face on it.

While the fabric was a cut above the rest, this blanket fell short in other areas. I tested it on a particularly cold night, when our apartment hit the low 60s, and it was nowhere near warm enough. I couldn’t get warm initially, and I ended up grabbing a heavy blanket to throw over it. The second night of testing was more tepid, and the blanket was fine by itself—so while it isn’t suited to chilly winters, it may fare well during other seasons or in more temperate climates.

Unlike most duvets, which have anchors close to the tip of the corner that are just long enough to tie the duvet cover on, the Leesa insert has noticeably long corner anchors. These longer strips leave room for the duvet cover to slide back and forth along the anchors, and shift in a way that could be annoying. It also absorbs liquids more readily than most, which could make a spill a bigger mess to clean up even right after it happens. I also found that stains were tougher to remove.

Pros

  • Soft outer fabric

Cons

  • Long corner anchors

  • Absorbent

Cozy Earth Bamboo Comforter - All Season

While the exterior fabric of the Cozy Earth All-Season Bamboo Comforter was one of the softest and silkiest we tested, its down-alternative loft is shockingly thin. It feels—and performs—more like a throw blanket than a comforter. Both the exterior and fill are made of viscose from bamboo.

However, due to its thin profile, this comforter failed to keep me warm at night. Even though I sleep warm, I was still freezing! My partner and I ended up putting another blanket on top of it. We tested the “All-Season” option, but I think it would only really be sufficient in the summer or if you live in a temperate climate, and I wouldn’t recommend it for most. That said, the company’s “Winter” version of the comforter could fare better in colder conditions.

Pros

  • Good for summer

  • Eco-friendly

Cons

  • Wasn't warm

  • Expensive

The Company Store LaCrosse Down Comforter (Light)

The LaCrosse Down Comforter was one of the few products I thought was actually too heavy. This is especially strange considering we tested the company’s lightest weight option—there are also medium, heavy, and extra heavy styles available.

That said, this comforter did keep me warm, and it comes in a variety of bright colors to add interest to your bedroom. But overall, the comforter was just OK. And in my book, why buy just an “OK” product?

Pros

  • Warm

  • Variety of colors

Cons

  • Heavy

  • Expensive

  • Mediocre

Snowe Down Alternative Comforter

Although the Snowe Home Down Alternative Comforter was soft and cozy, it ranked poorly in our test because I felt cold while sleeping under it—and as a warm sleeper, that raises eyebrows. (But for people who are really hot sleepers, maybe it's a great fit.) I ended up putting a heavy blanket over myself during the night to get to a comfortable temperature.

However, Snowe also has an All-Season option that has 40% more fill, which would likely be warmer and heavier.

Pros

  • Affordable

Cons

  • Cold

Casper Down Duvet

On paper, the Casper Duvet seems like it'd be a good comforter, but it fell flat in a number of areas. The first thing we noticed when taking it out of the box was its strange fabric. The exterior is 100% cotton with a 370 thread count and percale weave—yet somehow feels like plastic. It makes a lot of noise any time you shift under it‚ which made it seem as though I was sleeping with a tarp. You’d need to put a duvet cover over this blanket, but even then you’d probably still be able to hear some rustling each time you move.

This duvet performed okay when we napped during the day, but overnight I found myself a little chilly underneath it. The duvet is filled with down and has an extra layer of merino wool inside, so I was surprised that it wasn’t as warm as other down comforters. At the end of the day, neither my partner nor I enjoyed using this comforter at all. There are much better options, especially given its high price.

Pros

  • None we could find

Cons

  • Chilly overnight

  • Expensive

  • Plasticky exterior

AmazonBasics Reversible Microfiber Comforter

The AmazonBasics Reversible Microfiber Comforter simply isn’t worth your money, even though it is the least expensive option we tested. It is soft and not as prone to wrinkling as others we tested, but comforters’ main purpose is generally warmth—and this blanket doesn’t come through on that front. It’s so thin that you’ll wonder if there’s any batting inside—I had to put another blanket over it to stay warm. Plus, it’s not well constructed and soaks up liquids greedily, though in my testing stains came out with a cycle through the laundry.

Pros

  • Affordable

Cons

  • Not worth money

  • Soaks up liquid

  • Cold

Amerisleep Recover+ Comforter

The Amerisleep Recover+ claims to do more than keep you warm—it’s supposed to “increase circulation for more restful sleep and faster recovery.” But it’s all moot because the comforter can’t even keep you warm. On a cold night, I needed two extra blankets to maintain a comfortable temperature under the Recover+ Comforter. I didn’t feel as though I was getting any insulation from it, making me question whether the comforter is simply too breathable.

The cover of the comforter, which is a grayish-tan color that resists stains, is made from a cotton-Celliant blend, and the blanket is filled with a mixture of Lyocell, polyester, and Celliant. According to the brand that makes Celliant, it’s made with thermo-reactive minerals and a blend of 88 trace elements are embedded into yarn or applied to the surface of a fabric that’s designed to absorb your body heat. I didn’t notice a difference in sleep experience compared to a normal blanket, though the comforter did feel unique—not necessarily rough or soft, just different in a way that’s hard to put a finger on.

Pros

  • Breathable

Cons

  • Cold

Nectar Hit the Hay White Duvet

As someone who sleeps hot, I was intrigued that the Nectar’s claims that the Climasmart Duvet will keep you the perfect temperature all night thanks to its breathable cotton exterior and body-temperature regulating “Climasmart” polyester fill. But, unfortunately, it fell flat during testing—really flat.

After taking it out of the box and fluffing it up, I was unimpressed with the Nectar Duvet, as it was really thin. It seemed like there wasn’t nearly enough fill inside the blanket. Sure enough, it was passable to sleep under on a 70-degree night, but I was extremely chilly the next night when the temperature dropped. I ended up grabbing a throw to put on top of it to stay warm.

Additionally, the blanket’s 300 thread count cotton exterior had a plastic-like sensation to the touch. It made a swishing noise every time my boyfriend, our dog, or I shifted during the night—we couldn’t wait to get it off the bed.

Pros

  • None we could find

Cons

  • Cold

  • Plasticky surface

Meet the testers

Camryn Rabideau

Camryn Rabideau

Contributor

@CamrynWrites

Camryn Rabideau is a valued contributor to the Reviewed.com family of sites.

See all of Camryn Rabideau's reviews
Lindsey Vickers

Lindsey Vickers

Staff Writer, Sleep

@lindseyvix

Lindsey writes about sleep, lifestyle, and more for Reviewed. In her waking hours, she likes to spend time outside, read, cook, and bake. She holds a master’s in journalism from Boston University and bachelors' degrees in English Literature and Anthropology from the University of Utah.

See all of Lindsey Vickers's reviews
Jamie Ueda

Jamie Ueda

Apparel Staff Writer

Jamie writes about clothing, shoes, and accessories for Reviewed. She loves apparel and doesn't like to sacrifice fashion, comfort, or quality in whatever she wears.

See all of Jamie Ueda's reviews

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