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Experts share spring decorating ideas for your home

Lighten up colors and fabrics for a sunnier mood

1) Close up of an ombré orange pair of curtains. 2) Close up of a house plant. 3) Close up on a stack of wooden bowls. Credit: Anthropologie / The Sill / Crate & Barrel

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It can be hard to spring back from all that winter throws at us: freezing temps, whipping winds, barren backyards. But, with all of these dreary elements in our rearview mirrors, now’s the time to breathe a bit of fresh air into your home décor. Spring embodies a sense of renewal, and there are many easy ways to spruce up your home to play into the season.

We asked a few design experts how to shed the darker vibes of chilly months and uplift your space. When you’re done taking their advice, open your windows, clean off your sills, and let the sunshine in. With a fresh breeze flowing into your environs, you can embrace the season with a spring in your step. 

Lighten up bedding and fabrics

Two images of cream and white sheets on a bed.
Credit: Brooklinen

Go light and bright with bedding.

When warmer weather makes a welcome appearance, don’t sleep on the opportunity. It’s time to consider softer, lighter bed linens.

New York City-based designer Peter Sandel says, “By layering your bedding as you would any smart spring outfit, you’ll shed needless pieces as seasonal temperatures rise. This approach will take your bedroom from crisp spring evenings into the hot summer nights without unnecessary fuss.”

So, say goodbye to flannels, and hello to lighter fabrics. Dive into soft silky material that also helps regulate body temperature to keep you comfortable and cool all night long. Bonus points if the sheets boasts playful spring bloom patterns.

Consider this change-up for other fabrics in the home by swapping heavier ones like velvet and faux fur with breezier options like organic cotton, satin, or silk. By using soft colors like lavender, light blue, and pastel pinks combined with fun patterns, the space will begin to feel more welcoming to warmer weather.

“Springtime [also] offers seasonal opportunity to update tired accent pillows and throws with something fresh and new,” continues Sandel. “In transitioning your home into the warmer months, consider lighter fabrics like cotton and linen as textile choices for these functional and decorative pieces. For a high-impact update, use these accessories as a way to introduce texture, color and bold prints into the personalization of your space.”

Bring in houseplants so you can bloom indoors, too

Close up of a countertop with utensils and a houseplant.
Credit: The Sill

Add some green inside.

Spring is a season budding with new beginnings, and bringing in a houseplant (or two) is a beneficial update to any home’s design aesthetic, according to Sandel.

“Living plants do our mental and physical well-being good,” he says. “Aside from purifying the air, caring for living things in our home gives our days and homes more purpose.”

Whether your space receives little or a lot of natural light, there are many houseplants to choose from and digging into the research can be fun. Think of grouping small plants in cute pots, or going big for the home with larger floor planters placed in corners.

Let in sunshine and light

Close up of two pairs of curtains in living rooms.
Credit: Anthropologie

Go for bold or muted curtain choices.

Taj Hunter Waite, designer and owner of All Things Taj in Hollywood, Florida, asks: What do you have covering your windows? Is it dark, or heavy, or both?

“One of the simplest ways to uplift a home is by lightening the color and texture of your window panels,” she says. “Assess your color palette and either choose a lighter shade to the color you currently have or be daring and change the color altogether.”

Noel Gatts, HGTV host and designer and owner of Beam & Bloom Interiors agrees.

“There are so many easy visual ways to make your home look fresh for spring, and one of my favorites is drapery,” she explains. “Swap out heavy curtains for light and airy drapes made with linen or cotton. A sheer quality will let that spring light filter in while still providing plenty of privacy. You can’t go wrong with white, but explore a variety of soft earthy colors.”

Accessories bring in elements of springtime

Close up images of a wood dining table.
Credit: West Elm

Look for earthy elements when furniture shopping.

Set the mood for the next few months with artful and fun décor. Think of adding interesting pieces such as sculptural objects or coffee table books that not only compliment your color scheme but scream spring.

If you’re furniture shopping, look for natural materials like rattan, cane, and weaving that bring an earthy element to your home. Not only is wicker a hot weave for patio furniture, it’s big inside the home, too.

Introduce food as accents in the kitchen

Close up images of wicker and wood bowls.
Credit: Crate & Barrel

Fill these bowls up with seasonal fruit.

When it comes to updating for the season, don’t forget the heart of the home. The kitchen is the perfect place to add springtime colors and texture, from cookware to simple dish towels.

Waite says, “Add to or change the colors with simple, but high-impact, ideas.” She also notes placing a basket or bowl of bright fruit in the kitchen (real or faux) is an easy start.

“If you love yellow, fill a textured wooden bowl of lemons—nine, to be exact,” she says. “In feng shui, a grouping of nine lemons in the kitchen cleanses and uplifts any unkind energy.” 

Not feeling lemons? Go for apples, pears, or oranges, but stick with only one type. “Don’t make it hard work,” she says. “Have fun with it.”

Considering the past few years, Gatts says, “This spring more than ever, we are anxious to gather around tables together. I am a huge fan of plants in any home and adding them during spring is the perfect time to try your hand at a green thumb.”

Make it tasty and start an indoor herb garden stocked with mint, basil, rosemary, thyme, or anything you please. Get creative with color and layout, and please your palace and your palette by filling an empty wall in the kitchen or dining room.

Pictures of spring makes it feel more like spring

Close up of a framed spring artwork.
Credit: Etsy / LittleLadyPrintShop

Keep spring in your home year-round with artwork.

Anna Franklin, interior designer and founder of Stone House Collective in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, says that rotating artwork related to the season may seem obvious to some, but it's a subtle and easy switch that will instantly make your home feel different.

“Select pieces that incorporate florals, landscapes with lush greens, and relaxing outdoor scenes to reflect a springtime feel inside the space,” she explains.

If you prefer to hang family photos, pick images from your favorite spring adventures of years past. Franklin says, “In addition to making you smile, the spring scenery shown will have the same effect that a spring-inspired art piece will have.”

Candles heighten the senses

Close up of a Yankee Candle on a tabletop.
Credit: Yankee Candle

Announce the arrival of spring through floral scents.

One of the most overlooked and easiest ways to spruce your home up for spring is through scent. A perfectly placed scented candle can give a welcome fresh intensity to your home, all with the strike of a match.

Franklin says, “Many people overlook the power of scent and what it can bring to a space. Fragrance can make a home feel welcoming and refreshed for the season depending on the scents selected.”

For spring, she suggests opting for lighter floral scents like lilac and gardenia, mixed with the earthy and energizing scents of eucalyptus, citrus, and mint.

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