Suffice it to say, the overall performance here just doesn't cut it. The combination of flimsy parts, inexact estimated times, and slow, ineffective cycles with forest-fire-like temperatures knock this machine down several big-picture pegs.

The uppermost part of the is a plastic mantle that showcases a shiny cycle dial and an array of plastic-covered buttons (the kind that sometimes crack over time) which control extra features, customizable options, power, and start.

Front Image
Controls 1 Photo
Controls 2 Photo
Interior Photo

The interior of the CDWT980VSS.

The lint trap is flimsy and open-sided. Many traps are made with synthetic mesh which lint clings to effectively, but this one is made entirely of cheap plastic, which isn't as textured and allows the lint to go flying around if you aren't careful.

Lint Trap Photo
Sides Photo

Olympus SZ-31MR iHS side views

Back Photo

We peered curiously into this dryer after testing the temperatures: Might it have the power to transport hapless launderers to the South Pacific? Is there a piña colada button too? Did a fire-breathing dragon pass through? No. Evidently, this GE summons Hephaestus whilst drying clothes on Normal, Quick, and Towels / Sheets cycles, which reach 163.2, 155.6, and a blazing 175.3 degrees, respectively. This is far too hot. It's a sock pile, not the shield of Achilles. The Quick cycle drags on for nearly 40 minutes and the Bulky cycle clops along for 76, but at least the laundry comes out dry (or nearly dry) every time.

With desert-like heat, the Normal cycle tortures 100% of the water out of a load in a standard 58 minutes -- which is exactly what the estimated time claims, happily. Aside from the 163.2 degree temperature, this cycle is doing what it should.

The Delicate cycle, unlike the other cycles, will not blow-torch the water out of your laundry. Though it takes longer than we'd like at 68 minutes, but all save 3% of the moisture is removed from a load and the temperature is very, very gentle -- 112 degrees.

This Towels / Sheets cycle reaches an alarming temperature of 175.3 degrees. Your comforter won't turn into a flaming comet or anything, but this is far too hot, and this cycle only removes 85% of the moisture. To be fair, this test is a really tough one. A comforter is the thickest thing that probably ever goes into a dryer, and as such it tends to tangle and retain a damp center.

The Quick cycle lumbers on for all of 37 minutes and blasts 100% of the water out of a load at a toasty temperature of 155.6 degrees. We wish that both the time and the temperature were lower, but at least it gets things dry, which is more than a lot of Quick cycles can do.

The comes armed with eight major cycles: Cottons, Mixed Loads, Perm Press, Delicates, Towels / Sheets, Antibacterial, Speed Dry, and Timed Dry. Additionally, there are four special cycle, which are Steam Refresh, Steam Dewrinkle, Quick Fluff, and Dewrinkle. In order to use the steam options, users must connect the dryer to a water supply.

Controls 1 Photo

Meet the testers

Virginia Barry

Virginia Barry

Former Managing Editor

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Virginia is a former Managing Editor at Reviewed.com. She has a background in English and journalism. Away from the office, Virginia passes time with dusty books & house cats.

See all of Virginia Barry's reviews
Virginia Barry

Virginia Barry

Former Managing Editor

@

Virginia is a former Managing Editor at Reviewed.com. She has a background in English and journalism. Away from the office, Virginia passes time with dusty books & house cats.

See all of Virginia Barry's reviews

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