This machine looks simple and old-fashioned, but it actually has some very appealing modern features, like Steam Refresh, Eco Monitoring, and a great user interface. Too bad its overall performance just doesn't cut it. The combination of flimsy parts, erratic estimated times, and forest-fire-like temperatures knock this machine down several big-picture pegs.

A couple of parts on this GE really cut corners, but usability is mostly a breeze

You are not permitted to watch your underpants tumble, as there is no viewing window.

This GE's plastic mantle showcases a shiny cycle dial and an array of plastic-covered buttons—the kind that sometimes crack over time. Navigation is pleasing, as selections are clearly arranged and accompanied by cheery green LEDs to indicate every choice you make.

The door closes easily and reverses as well, but you are not permitted to watch your underpants tumble, as there is no viewing window. The lint trap is flimsy and open-sided. Made entirely of cheap plastic, it allows lint to go flying around if you aren't careful.

This just in: moisture flees in terror from fire-breathing dryer

We peered curiously into this dryer after testing the temperatures: Does it transport hapless launderers to the South Pacific? Is there a piña colada button too? Did Mount Vesuvius erupt in there? No. Evidently, this GE prays to Hephaestus whilst drying clothes, reaching temperatures upwards of 175ºF. This is far too hot. It's a sock pile, not the shield of Achilles! In temperatures like these, threads will take a real beating, so while several basic cycles remove most or all of the moisture from a load, they aren't doing it tenderly—all save the Delicate cycle, that is, which does remember to maintain gentle temperatures.

This GE prays to Hephaestus whilst drying clothes, reaching temperatures upwards of 175ºF.

Inexplicably, like the moth to the flaming dryer, you are still reading. Maybe your wardrobe is indestructible. Fine, if that's the case, feel free to enjoy not only the eight basic cycles on this GE, but also some specialty modes like Steam Dewrinkle (which requires a water source) and Quick Fluff. Additionally, there are customizable treats like five levels of time, dryness, and temperature, and even a button that saves personalized cycles.

Drop it like it's hot

As much as we would love to recommend the $799 MSRP for its great user interface and its thorough drying abilities (not to mention its sale price of $670), its unreasonable temperatures convince us not to. Heats of over 175ºF are for miniature pizzas, not for laundry.

Okay, so maybe you're a big bearded fellow living deep in the woods and all you wear are thick jean overalls and canvas shirts—even your socks and underpants are made of denim! You towel off with potato sacks! A blazing hot Normal cycle doesn't deter you! Fine, then enjoy the range of customizable options and extra features that this GE offers, like Eco Monitor and Steam Refresh. Just don't let your one secret set of prized silk sheets anywhere near your new dryer.

Desert-like temperatures and slow cycles really diminish the overall performance score on this machine, however it does consistently remove nearly all the wetness from a load and it remembers to handle Delicates at a careful temperature, unlike the rest.

The works with blistering fury to remove moisture

Temperature was a big problem on this machine. Heats of 145ºF are on the high end of what we like to see on any cycle, and this dryer's Towel/Sheets cycle reached a ridiculous 175.3ºF. Your comforter won't turn into a flaming comet, per se, but this is far too hot. The Normal cycle was toasty too, torturing water out of laundry with 163.2ºF temperatures. Even the Quick cycle revs up to a blistering 155.6 degrees.

The only cycle that kept its cool on this GE was the Delicate cycle, which handles clothes at a surprisingly gentle 112ºF.

Moisture flees from the

Normally, we would enthusiastically celebrate a Quick cycle that achieved 100% water removal, but in this case we only do so reservedly, due to its excessive temperatures. The same can be said for the Normal cycle in this case. Worst of all was the Towels/Sheets cycle though, which was the hottest of all and also the least effective, removing only 85% moisture from our test load. To be fair, this test is a really tough one. A comforter is the thickest thing that probably ever goes into a dryer, and as such it tends to tangle and retain a damp center.

All in all, while this is a power-house dryer in terms of water retention, it is ultimately to the detriment of your clothes with the single exception of the Delicate cycle.

Meet the testers

Virginia Barry

Virginia Barry

Former Managing Editor

@

Virginia is a former Managing Editor at Reviewed.com. She has a background in English and journalism. Away from the office, Virginia passes time with dusty books & house cats.

See all of Virginia Barry's reviews

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