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While our labs may be built on a foundation of concrete and stone, Reviewed.com is built on a foundation of science. Objective testing is bedrock upon which trust is built. For washing machines, our tests offer unimpeachable evidence of cleaning performance and efficiency. So let's get started, shall we?

All plastic on top, all good

Though painted to look like steel, there isn't a lick of metal on the control pannel. That's not really a bad thing, since the polished plastic is more resistant to fingerprints and scratching. The simplicity of the MVWB725BW's design plays to its favor. Usability-wise, you won't find anything amiss. The no-slam lid insures that you won't have to watch your head when you put in laundry. Everything is clearly labeled, and you shouldn't have any problems operating this machine.

MVWB725BW_Controls_2.jpg
You shouldn't have any problems operating this machine.

In fact, the whole budget for this machine seems to have been devoted to the innards. The machine we tested appeared a little rough around the edges, with exposed metal corners and some visible screws. But it's still sleeker than any traditional top-loader.
We gauge cleaning performance by analyzing stain strips. When we get them from the lab where they're manufactured, the strips are covered in standardized stains of common household substances like red wine and carbon. We tuck them away in an eight pound load of laundry and wash them. After the core washing cycles end, we take the strips and place them under a photospectrometer to determine how much color has been removed.

When all was said and done, the Maytag Bravos XL MVWB725BW proved to be a competent washing machine. The Powerwash cycle was by and far the best. It powered through every stain with about equal zest. However, with all other cycles sweat and cocoa turned out to be the most vanquished. That's a pretty good sign, since both of these substances are on the the opposite sides of the pH scale. Overall, you can feel comfortable that your clothes are clean if you wash them in the MVWB725BW.

Cleaning performance? Yay! Efficiency? Eh.

A washing machine should wash your clothes, and the Maytag Bravos XL MVWB725BW has no trouble getting that job done. The Heavy Duty Powerwash cycle took only an hour and 17 minutes, and blasted through every stain we could throw at it. And every other core cycle proved to be on par with higher-priced competition. With a fifty-four minute Normal cycle and a 4.5 cubic foot capacity, you'll be master of the laundry in no time.

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The Powerwash cycle took only an hour and 17 minutes, and blasted through every stain we could throw at it.

Well, at least until you get your water bill. I don't care how much of an outlaw you want to be, but there are a set of rules you just can't break: the laws of physics. This new Bravos has an innovative way of agitating a wash load, and it'll certainly be more efficient than a ten year old machine, but it can't be helped that a top loader requires more water than a front-loading machine. While a top loader has to splash water all over a load of laundry, a front loader can just tumble it through a small puddle until it's soaked through.

The MVWB725BW demonstrates this through its estimated combined annual water and energy cost of $53. The most efficient front loaders cost under $30 a year. Over five years, that's $125 in savings, depending on how much water costs where you live.
For our purposes, efficiency is about two things: what goes in and what comes out. What goes in is water and electricity. What comes out is wet clothes, and the wetter they are the more work your dryer has to do.

On both counts, many top loaders fall flat on their faces. This Maytag does require a lot of water and power. We estimate that the yearly running cost to be close to be $53. To put that in perspective, most front-loaders run about $30-40 a year. What came out was okay. On average, the MVWB725BW managed to spin out 63 percent of our test loads' weight in water, which is very good. Your dryer will thank you.
Front-loading machines are sometimes touted as the be-all, end-all of washing machines. But not everyone wants a front loader. If you're one of those folks, check out the Maytag Bravos XL MVWB725BW. It's got the cleaning power to get in the ring with front-loaders and certainly any other top-loader. The Powerwash cycle is one of the best we've seen on a top-loader. Yes, efficiency is an issue, but that's an inherent tradeoff with this style of machine. If you're looking for a top-loading washing machine and not looking to break the bank, check out the MVWB725BW.

Meet the tester

Jonathan Chan

Jonathan Chan

Lab Manager

@ReviewedHome

Jonathan Chan currently serves as the Lab Manager at Reviewed. If you clean with it, it's likely that Jon oversees its testing. Since joining the Reviewed in 2012, Jon has helped launch the company's efforts in reviewing laptops, vacuums, and outdoor gear. He thinks he's a pretty big deal. In the pursuit of data, he's plunged his hands into freezing cold water, consented to be literally dragged through the mud, and watched paint dry. Jon demands you have a nice day.

See all of Jonathan Chan's reviews

Checking our work.

We use standardized and scientific testing methods to scrutinize every product and provide you with objectively accurate results. If you’ve found different results in your own research, email us and we’ll compare notes. If it looks substantial, we’ll gladly re-test a product to try and reproduce these results. After all, peer reviews are a critical part of any scientific process.

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