• Related content

Front Image

A classic set-up with a knob in the middle and controls

Controls 1 Photo

Use the knob to select the desired cycle

Controls 2 Photo

Looks like we've got 26 minutes to kill.

Drawer Photo

The drawer is divided into sections for detergent, bleach, and fabric softener.

Interior Photo

The Duet has a bright interior.

Sides Photo

This is what the Whirlpool Duet looks like from the side.

Back Photo

The back of the Whirlpool Duet.

The amount of power that the sought was on the level of Ming the Merciless. The Sanitize cycle used a whopping 1178 watt hours and it didn't even get to the necessary 155 degrees to actually sanitize. Electricity usage accounts for a small percentage of a washing machine's yearly operating costs. If you're power rates are on par with the national average, we estimate the will add about $5.78 to your clearly bills.

electricity Use.jpg

All the water that will ever be is, right now. That's from the 1933 issue of National Geographic. On a more serious note, The is slightly more thirsty than most washers. The Whites cycle used about 22.6 gallons of water. The Quick cycle skimped out on the most, but still managed to consume over 10 gallons. If you wanted to break this down into dollars and cents, the will add around $25.75 to your annual water bill, based on national averages.

If you wanted the Whirlpool Duet WFW94HEA to be coin operated, and you wanted to break even -- well, you’d have to disregard the initial start up cost of the coin mechanism, and you’d also have to… Our apologies. This hypothetical scenario has written us into a corner we can't get out. Anyway… the Normal cycle costs about 8 cents in water and power. The Whites cycle was more than double the cost at 18 cents. This is because a Whites cycle is designed to work with bleach which cleans best at higher temperatures. More water is also required in order to prevent the stench of bleach being left behind. All cycles were cheaper than going to the laundromat.

WFW94HEAW_Efficiency.png

Using the average national costs for electricity and water, we've calculated that the has a yearly operating cost $38.98. That's a little on the high side.

Whirlpool_WFW94HEAW_Yearly_Running_Cost.jpg

{{ attachments(5119300ef004749336000cc3)
{{ attachments(5119334848a75130d4000c46)
We clocked the Normal cycle with a finishing time of 55 minutes. It blew us away with its consistency. Except for the sebum stain, the Whirlpool Duet WFW94HEA out performed the average washer.

Related content

{{ attachments(51192f8498faf87f60000a5e)
Whites cycle usually differ from the Normal cycles by bring the water to a higher temperature. This is because Whites cycles are designed to be used in conjunction with bleach which cleans better in warmer water. In this cycle, the Whirlpool Duet WFW94HEA did better with wine and blood stains. With the cocoa and sebum stains, however, the performance was about the same when compared to the Normal cycle.

{{ attachments(51192f3b99d02e5879000ce9)
The Delicates cycle was by far the weakest of what the Whirlpool Duet WFW94HEA had to offer. It struggled with all the stains we threw at it. Still, it was one of the most delicate Delicates cycles we’ve encountered. We wouldn’t put something irreplaceable in there, but would feel more than comfortable throwing our favorite shirt in there.

{{ attachments(51192f4fb1545d83ec000cf6)
Sometimes you need a wrecking ball for those heavily soiled loads. In lieu of a wrecking ball, the Whirlpool Duet WFW94HEA offers a Heavy Duty cycle. There was a noticeable difference between the Heavy Duty and the Normal cycle. There was a 15 percent increase in wine stain removal. However, the trade off is in clothing wear, for which there is about a 25 percent increase.

{{ attachments(51192f6598faf87f60000a5c)
If you have less than thirty minutes to spare, the Quick cycle is for you. Lasting 22 minutes, the Quick wash performed above and beyond what we expected. The Normal cycle only had a slight edge on the Quick cycle.

{{ attachments(51192faa99d02e5879000cf4)
Things fall apart. Poetic, isn’t it? It is inevitable that whenever you place your clothes in a washing machine they are going to come out a little more worn than when they went in. How much varies wildly between machines. In this regard, the Whirlpool Duet WFW94HEA had a fairly good performance. To test this, we put in mechanical action strips which have five stamped one-inch holes in them. After the cycle is complete we take them out and count how many threads have come loose. Click here to learn more about how we test.
We weigh every test load before and after a cycle. We collect this data in order to determine whether or not a washer is a team player. By this, we mean does the washer spin out excess water so that your dryer doesn’t have to work as hard. After wading through all the data, we have determine that the Whirlpool Duet WFW94HEA passed the ball, but not the buck. Everything but the Delicates cycle spun out around 46% of the load’s weight water. Anything below 50% gets a gold star in our book.

Water Retention.jpg
Whirlpool_WFW94HEAW_Cycle_Details.jpg

We were able to adjust all the standards. Everything from temperature, spin speed, soil level, and pre-soak time could be tweaked.

Controls 2 Photo

Looks like we've got 26 minutes to kill.

The had plenty of additional wash options. You can add steam to selected cycles. There is also the ability to activate Ecoboost which lowers the amount of electricity consumed. The most interesting feature is the fan dry. If activated, your laundry will be kept fresh for up to 12 hours. It is advertised as being able to dry one or two garments overnight. However, we completely disregarded that and placed in a four pound test load of shirts, sheets, and towels. The next day, we weighed the load and found that it retained only 28% of its weight in water. That's 20% less water than just having it sit here after a Quick cycle. The load didn't get musty, which is a real plus. Considering the data, one or two shirts probably would get completely dry after sitting in there overnight.

Controls 1 Photo

Use the knob to select the desired cycle

The has separate compartments for bleach, fabric softener, and detergent. We did find that detergent did start to build up in the drawer after several uses. It would be prudent to clean it out every once in a while to prevent a clog.

Drawer Photo

The drawer is divided into sections for detergent, bleach, and fabric softener.

Pull on handle, open door, it's that simple. The 's door has a solid design. We also appreciated the light that came on when the door was opened. This will be especially useful for those who keep their washer in an ill lit basement.

Interior Photo

The Duet has a bright interior.

The should be simple to use. Like most other front loading washers in its class, operating the is a matter of turning the knob to the desired cycle and pushing the start button. This washer has no buttons in the traditional sense. It has touch buttons similar to those found on the click wheel of an iPod. Although more technologically advanced than other washers, these buttons were not as responsive as we would have liked.

The is compelled to action by a set of touch controls. Like with most other washers, the has a knob to select cycles.

Controls 1 Photo

Use the knob to select the desired cycle

Controls 2 Photo

Looks like we've got 26 minutes to kill.

This machine isn't as efficient as some other washers in its price range. It sits on the high side with its $38.98 yearly operating cost. This number is derived from the 's high water and electricity usage Anyone buying this washer will have to consider the long term costs. This is especially true if your water costs are above the national average.

The had a very good washing performance. It powered through stains. It struggled during the Delicates cycle. However, the majority of test loads came out cleaner than the rest of the pack. We were most impressed with its effectiveness against sebum and cocoa. These two stains are on the opposite sides of the pH scale and the Whirlpool dealt with them both.

The has a myriad of features. Ecoboost reduces power consumption. You can add steam to selected cycles. The feature that intrigued us the most was the fan dry option. Originally created to help dry out excess water from the interior, Whirlpool relaunched it as an aid to clothes drying. In the end, it mostly just fanned. A load of shirts, sheets, and towels, remained damp after being left in the overnight. It'll help you keep your dryer costs down and prevent your clothes from getting musty. Perhaps, it may dry out a shirt or two overnight, but not much more. Overall, the 's features are well intentioned and balanced if not well executed.

Meet the tester

Jonathan Chan

Jonathan Chan

Lab Manager

@ReviewedHome

Jonathan Chan currently serves as the Lab Manager at Reviewed. If you clean with it, it's likely that Jon oversees its testing. Since joining the Reviewed in 2012, Jon has helped launch the company's efforts in reviewing laptops, vacuums, and outdoor gear. He thinks he's a pretty big deal. In the pursuit of data, he's plunged his hands into freezing cold water, consented to be literally dragged through the mud, and watched paint dry. Jon demands you have a nice day.

See all of Jonathan Chan's reviews

Checking our work.

We use standardized and scientific testing methods to scrutinize every product and provide you with objectively accurate results. If you’ve found different results in your own research, email us and we’ll compare notes. If it looks substantial, we’ll gladly re-test a product to try and reproduce these results. After all, peer reviews are a critical part of any scientific process.

Shoot us an email