cameras
  • Best of Year 2013
  • Editors' Choice

Olympus TG-2 Digital Camera Review

Last year's best adventure cam gets even better.

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Readers may remember the Olympus TG-1 as the winner of our definitive 2012 Waterproof Camera Showdown, we found it was not only a great toughcam, but an excellent camera, period. For this year's TG-2 (MSRP $379.99), Olympus seems to be sticking with its proven formula, and that's a good move.

While the TG-1 was already the most resilient camera of last year's group, Olympus has extended the TG-2's waterproofing down to 50 feet, catching up with 2013 competition. The company has also added something called Microscopic Macro, which we'll detail later, as well as a hot new color scheme for the body and removable lens ring. It's the winner of our 2013 Waterproof Showdown. Read on to find out why.

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Design & Handling

An eye-catching exterior can't hide serious design flaws.

The Holy Grail of toughcam design is to make your camera look armored, without looking like some sort of Fisher-Price toy. Pentax achieved this with its WG-2 (affectionately known as the "Batman camera" in our office), then refined the design for the WG-3. Olympus seems to have taken a page out of their rival's book.

Our evaluation model is the sexier of the two color schemes: all black with a red ring around the lens. This ring can be removed and replaced with Olympus' CLA-T01 screw adapter, which can then attach to an Olympus telephoto or fisheye converter.

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The TG-2 doesn't exactly blend in with the elements, but it's still a cool design.

The rear panel is dominated by a three-inch OLED monitor. While "OLED" looks great on a spec sheet, in reality this screen just isn't very good. The panel isn't bright enough for use in broad daylight, and if you're viewing it from any angle other than head-on, the color balance will be thrown off. Despite the "Tough" branding, the monitor is not protected by scratch-resistant plastic, and will be badly dinged up after just one day of mountain hiking.

Handling the TG-2 is awkward because all shooting controls—even the mode dial—are relegated to the rear panel. In order to adjust... really any control at all, you'll need to support the camera with a second hand and use your thumb. If you instead attempt to finagle the camera with only one hand, your finger-gymnastics are likely to smudge the recessed lens area and ruin a few shots. The vertical mode dial is also way too slippery to use while the camera is wet. A zoom lever or horizontal mode dial on the top of the body would've been nice.

Aperture priority is supported, but not full-featured. For example, at the widest focal length, you may choose between f/2, f/2.8, and f/8. That's it. We speculate aperture changes are the result of a neutral density filter, not a narrowing iris, since depth of field is unaffected. There is no shutter priority, which would've been a better choice for the mode dial than useless Magic Effect modes, but you can always trick the camera by using fast or slow aperture and ISO values.

Certain shooting situations can be taxing, since the TG-2's shutter release is both too shallow and too stiff. The TG-2 is excellent for macro photography, but those shots require a steady hand, and we struggled to capture a shot without moving the camera around, introducing motion blur and imperfect focus. Perhaps we need to use those grip-strengthener things more often.

Performance

"Hey everyone! Come look at this!"

That's how news of the TG-2's incredible autofocus speed moved through the office. After unboxing our review unit, the very first order of business was to alert the entire DigitalCameraInfo corner to this spectacle, and have them try out the focus system for themselves. We're talking fractions of a second before the TG-2 snaps to focus. You can literally focus and shoot in half the time most compacts take just to focus. Thank Olympus' TruePic VI processor for this ability, the same chip used for the OM-D series, which is also known for fast autofocus.

You can literally focus and shoot in half the time most compacts take just to focus.

With that said, if you're locking in on different distances in quick succession, the TG-2 will—in its haste—sometimes miss focus entirely. What's worse, the autofocus indicator will turn green, as if the focus locked properly. Failure to focus is one thing, but false locks are cardinal sins to us. The problem isn't frequent, maybe once every 50 shots, but it does happen.

In other news, Olympus made subtle improvements to the TG-2's image quality. We detected improvements to color accuracy, though flesh tones are still a tad too saturated, so human subjects may not be rendered perfectly. The noise reduction algorithm is also a little more potent this year, but you should stick to ISO 400 or less when possible, since this camera's noise levels tend to spike at ISO 800. Automatic white balance, thankfully, is also far more accurate under artificial light. The camera will, on occasion, make a guess that's far too cool, but such mistakes are rare.

Sharpness scores jumped up this year too, but closer examination reveals this is the result of software enhancement, not improvements to the lens or sensor, and shouldn't be considered a serious reason to upgrade.

Features

Microscopic Macro brings you closer to nature... a lot closer.

What set the TG-1 apart, and does the same for the TG-2, is its f/2 lens. Rarely do we see any cameras south of $500 feature any special optics, but this series puts the "cam" back in "toughcam," and the effort goes a long way. Such shallow depth of field is possible with the TG-2 that some of our samples scarcely seemed like they were coming out of a point-and-shoot, much less a ruggedized one. Given the camera's unusually wide maximum aperture and excellent Super Macro mode, the TG-2 enters into direct competition with Pentax's macro-oriented WG series, and matches the WG-3's maximum aperture at wide and telephoto focal lengths.

The seals are so tight that it actually requires some elbow grease to close them.

We have a lot of confidence in the waterproof compartments on the bottom and left panels of the TG-2. Each gasketed door has two separate locks, and the seals are so tight that it actually requires some elbow grease to close them. This camera is rated waterproof to a depth of 50 feet, shockproof from a 7 foot drop, freezeproof to 14°F, and crushproof to 220 lbf.; making it one of the most resilient toughcams on the market.

To keep track of all the adventuring you'll be doing with your new adventure-cam, the TG-2 also comes with a built-in GPS. We tend not to get as excited about features like this, since it has nothing explicitly to do with photography, but the system does work and it works quickly. If you're outside or at least near a window, expect the TG-2 to pick up your exact location within seconds. The GPS software features internal Point of Interest data, but will always record the closest point to your EXIF data, even if you're only relatively close by. For example, if you live in the same town as a tourist hotspot, all your photos will be tagged accordingly, even if you're a mile away shooting cat pictures around the house.

Conclusion

You can't argue with the image quality.

The Olympus TG-2 comes with its fair share of quirks and problems. Yet it's very hard to ignore the impressive image quality that this compact, affordable, durable camera is capable of.

Indeed, the great indoor, outdoor, and underwater image quality is what led it to win our 2013 Waterproof Showdown. Just like its predecessor, the TG-2 is certainly the best tough-cam out there this year, and the only one of the bunch to win our Editor's Choice award. It's more than great pictures, though—the build quality is excellent, the feature set is fun and useful, and it's pretty easy to use.

When we first reviewed the camera, we found the controls and interface to be lacking. But compared to its peers in the waterproof genre, the user experience isn't so bad. Olympus's menu system could certainly use an update. Videos look fine, though the sound of the lens focusing and zooming always bleeds into the audio track. But on the whole, this is easily the best choice in the genre this year. Read our in-depth comparisons in the 2013 Waterproof Showdown.

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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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