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Christmas

Silver and gold creates a Roaring ’20s Christmas vibe—here's how to get the look

Time to sparkle

Gold Christmas ornaments surround white burning candle and Christmas lights. Credit: Getty Images / Liliboas

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Red and green might be a traditional duo for Christmas décor, but this year calls for something a little more decadent: Silver, gold, and glitter.

As the joyful and courageous Roaring ’20s (a post-pandemic time dripping with glitz and glamor) has been revamped in home décor, it makes sense to end 2021 with a seasonal sparkle as zany as that era of flappers, jazz, and art deco.

Bob Pranga, Los Angeles-based Dr. Christmas, known for his custom Christmas décor for a celebrity clientele, as well as film and television, says, “Christmas décor [can be] a reflection of what’s going on in a person’s life at the time. The 2020s, like the 1920s, are all about the party. It just might look a little different this time around, but the spirit is the same. It’s time to sparkle, be bold, and celebrate joy. We have had enough darkness, so let the light shine!”

Jessica Neuman, principal of New York-based Numi Interior Design, agrees. “The Roaring ’20s were a period of excess and opulence, which makes for a fun theme for your holiday,” she says. “When choosing a ‘20s theme, more is definitely more in terms of décor. Every detail should shine. Silver, gold, and crystal abound. Don't be afraid to mix metals and shiny elements for wall décor, table settings, you name it.”

So, grab a glass of champagne, pop on Judy Garland’s Christmas Album, and get to decorating. Soon your fireplace won’t be the only thing that’s roaring.

Bring glitz and glamor to your Christmas Tree

On left, gold Christmas ornaments. In middle, retro Christmas tree adorned with lavish gold ornaments above presents. On right, gold tinsel.
Credit: KI Store / Balsam Hill / llxieym

If you're looking to recreate a Christmas look that even Jay Gatsby would approve of, try adorning your tree with metallic tinsel and reflective ornaments.

With a ‘20s tree in 2021, it’s all about the glitz.

Jen Derry, EVP of product merchandising of artificial Christmas tree giant Balsam Hill, says, “We expect silver to take center stage this festive season. Its muted and cooler tone will help bring the snowy outside in—without the freezing cold temperatures.” Balsam Hill launched a Roaring Twenties ornament collection for this season.

“Gold—the color of 2020—[will also] feed through into holiday designs this year, helping add warmth and depth as it contrasts against the leading silver tones,” Derry adds.

Pranga agrees. “The 1920’s trees were meant to look like an exploding confetti ball.” Give in to that urge to party and make your tree sparkle and shine, whether it’s through today’s technology (hello, twinkle lights) or yesteryear’s method of reflection.

“The 1920s trees were covered in shiny surfaces to catch the light, since most did not have electric lights,” he says. “The nighttime sparkle came from the glow of fireplaces.”

Get the look with a sparkling tinsel tree or hang dozens of light strands on a freshly-cut fir. To reflect each shimmering light, fill the branches with glass, mirrored, or metallic ornaments.

Neuman says, “Smoked glass teardrop-shaped and silver and gold etched ornaments help achieve this look,” adding that you can also pay homage to the flappers of the day by buying pearls by the yard and wrapping your tree up top-to-bottom, along with other elements of feather or fringe.

Back in the 1920s, many people illuminated Christmas trees with real candles, which is unsafe and impractical. But you can still create the same type of effect without setting anything on fire. Los Angeles holiday designer and decorator Christine Mango says, “To create this nostalgic look, place strands of clip-on candle tree lights with a flicker flame. Many even have the dripping wax effect throughout the tree.”

Of course, no ‘20s homage is complete without the ultimate in silver and gold: tinsel. Mango suggests putting just a few strands on the end of several branches to finish off any Roaring ’20s-themed tree.

Extend this holiday look into the rest of your home

On left, small Christmas tree with rhinestone garland. In middle, gold and white peacock wallpaper behind chair holding books. On right, metallic glass Christmas tree.
Credit: Balsam Hill / LilinMomo / Lenox

Don't just stop at your Christmas tree, turn your whole house into a retro winter wonderland.

While the Christmas tree is clearly the focal point of your holiday decorations, there are plenty of other places to let the ‘20s shine this season.

Pranga suggests taking the same principles of décor from your tree and adding them to your fireplace mantle or tablescape greenery. “Remember, garland is not just greenery,” he says. “In the 1920s, garlands were made out of all kinds of materials, especially glass.”

Nikki Levy of Nikki Levy Interiors suggests, “Purchase a sequin table runner with geometric prints. Mirrored placemats also bring that ‘20s glam, especially when paired with gold cutlery.”

Also look into seasonal statues in fashionable silvers and golds, such as this gold deer or glass tree table top décor.

And don’t forget feathers—every flapper headband had one. “Peacock feathers are so eye-catching, decorative, and vibrant,” Levy says. “Fill vases with them and place them throughout the space.”

For Levy, pearl and jewel clothing trim are “a sensational adornment to Christmas wreaths and really add to the decadent and luxurious ‘20s vibe.”

But, above all, make it your own and make it fun. Pranga exclaims, “I have always believed, ‘Why do when you can overdo!’ Christmas is a celebration after all!”

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