Kitchen & Cooking

This is the most popular Christmas cookie in every state

Warning: Don't read this when you're hungry.

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Christmas isn't Christmas without a ton of cookies. Whether you leave them out for Santa with a glass of cold milk, host an annual Christmas cookie exchange, or love decorating gingerbread men with your family, enjoying all of the fresh-baked goodies is part of what makes it the most wonderful time of the year.

But what type of deliciousness should you be whipping up this holiday season? General Mills found the top Christmas cookies in each state based on the recipes with the most searches on BettyCrocker.com, Pillsbury.com and Tablespoon.com. Below are the results, plus our cooking experts' tips for baking the best Christmas cookies.

The state-by-state breakdown

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Santa will be very happy with any of these options.

Alabama: Sugar cookie bars

Alaska: Russian tea cakes

Arizona: Sugar cookies

Arkansas: Russian tea cakes

California: Peanut butter blossoms

Colorado: Spritz cookies

Connecticut: Oatmeal cookies

Delaware: Italian Christmas cookies

Florida: Peanut butter blossoms

Georgia: Cream cheese pecan cookies

Hawaii: Gingerbread cookies

Idaho: Candy cane cookies

Illinois: Spritz cookies

Indiana: Mexican wedding cakes

Iowa: Swedish kringla

Kansas: Crinkle cookies

Kentucky: Peanut butter blossoms

Louisiana: Nutella swirl cookies

Maine: Peanut butter chocolate truffles

Maryland: Snickerdoodles

Massachusetts: Sugar cookie bars

Michigan: Kolaczki cookies

Minnesota: Snickerdoodles

Mississippi: Sugar cookie bars

Missouri: Cake mix gooey butter cookies

Montana: Russian tea cakes

Nebraska: Peanut butter chocolate cookies

Nevada: Peanut butter blossoms

New Hampshire: Italian Christmas cookies

New Jersey: Italian Christmas cookies

New Mexico: Sugar cookies

New York: Black and white cookies

North Carolina: Sugar cookie bars

North Dakota: Spritz cookies

Ohio: Buckeyes

Oklahoma: Crinkle cookies

Oregon: Sugar cookies

Pennsylvania: Peanut butter blossoms

Rhode Island: Italian Christmas cookies

South Carolina: Peanut butter blossoms

South Dakota: Crinkle cookies

Tennessee: Sugar cookie bars

Texas: Sugar cookies

Utah: Melted snowman cookies

Vermont: Peanut butter chocolate trufffles

Virginia: Crinkle cookies

Washington: Spritz cookies

West Virginia: Peanut butter cookie cups

Wisconsin: German almond cookies

Wyoming: Peanut butter blossoms

How to bake the best Christmas cookies

Bake
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Making your cookies is just as fun as eating them.

While there's no such thing as a bad Christmas cookie, there are some ways to make them more delicious (with less effort!). First things first: Our kitchen and cooking editor, Cassidy Olsen, recommends the KitchenAid stand mixer to help you blend your dough without wearing out your arms. It's the number one stand mixer because it has so many interchangeable attachments that it can do almost anything and it will last for years and years to come.

Then you'll need a high-quality, sturdy baking sheet—like our favorite from Nordic Ware. These baking sheets are lightweight yet large enough to hold more than a dozen cookies and produce evenly-baked cookies thanks to their superior heat distribution. Cassidy also suggests placing this silicone mat underneath your cookies to make for easy cleanup and to prevent your precious treats from getting burned on the bottom.

And if you're cutting out shapes from your dough, don't forget the rolling pin. After testing a bunch of different ones, we found this wooden dowel to be the best because it rolled out dough perfectly every time and is easy to use so you can control the thickness of your cookies.

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