headphones

Shure SE530 Headphones Review

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Tour & Design

{{article.attachments['tour.jpg']}} Tour & Design  

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• Interesting design might be better for some users as opposed to others.

• Comes with a ton of extra accessories.

• Modular (short) cord.

• Durable, but open nozzles will let junk get in easier.

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**

Tour**


The Shure SE530s are a set of modular in-ear headphones, meaning their cord is super short. 

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The SE530s' left and right sides meet at a standard 1/8-inch plug.

The ear buds themselves have a somewhat interesting design: the nozzles stick out at an angle. The headphones naturally sit with the cord facing up and the nozzles pointing in towards your ear. This is great for those that like wrapping the cord around the backs of their ears, but is ever-so-slightly awkward for those that don't.

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***If you don't like wrapping the cord around your ear, you can either switch the left and right channels,

or invert the headphones, which will cause them to stick out, away from your head. ***

The plug-end of the headphones is like a tank. Shure has some of the best cord guards out of any in-ear headphones, which will increase the longevity of your set.

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***It would take some sort of horriffic cataclysm to damage this, in which case you

probably have more pressing matters than broken headphones.***

Below are what these headphones look like on HATS, our head and torso simulator. 


This is what the 'cord wrapped around the back of my ear' style looks like.

 

In The Box


There are a ton of things in the SE530s' box. The headphones come with a volume adapter, an optional remote & mic, an extension cord, a shorter extension cord, a cleaning tool, a total of eight different sleeves of various sizes and styles, a case, and the headphones themselves.

 

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Durability     (7.00*)*


Shure typically makes durable in-ears and the SE530s are no exception. We just have the same two qualms we usually do, and both deal with their nozzle. Typically in-ears top off their nozzles with mesh to prevent garbage from getting into the headphones. The SE530s' mesh wall is set very far back, which leave the majority of the nozzle open to fill up with all kinds of grossness. While the SE530s do come with a cleaning tool, it doesn't reach all the way back to the mesh guard: if something falls all the way to the bottom of the nozzle, it'll sit just out of reach. The second nozzle-related issue is its design itself. The 'bent nozzle' shape seems a bit fragile, like you could snap the headphones if you stepped on them the wrong way. Of course, the easy solution to this is to not run in place on your headphones while wearing metal shoes. Chances are you don't even own a pair of metal shoes, in which case this scenario is even easier to avoid.

 

All other areas are solid. The ear buds trail off into a rubbery cord guard to keep the cable from bending too sharply at that junction. The cord guard at the plug is so reinforced it looks somewhat comical. The cable's casing is more solid than average. The ear buds are almost difficult to pull off (the foam ones, at least), so there's no real risk in them popping off and getting lost forever.

 

Like it's predecessors, the Shure SE530s set a standard for in-ear durability.

 

**Aesthetics**     (*5.0**0)*


Aesthetics almost don't apply to in-ears. Since in-ear headphones are so small, it's very difficult to create a great-looking design. Further, also due to their small size, any design flair is likely to go unnoticed. The SE530s' bent nozzle allows users to wear them normally or loop the cord around the back of their ears easily. In terms of their looks, however, they're a bit plain. They're a glossy gray with some white branding on them. If you prefer professional (boring) headphones, the SE530s are a good pick. Otherwise, look for a set of in-ears that at least have a splash of color.

 

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Tour & Design
  2. Sound Quality
  3. Isolation
  4. Comfort
  5. Usability
  6. Sennheiser MM 50 iP Comparison
  7. Shure SE420 Comparison
  8. V MODA Vibe Duo Comparison
  9. Apple In ear Headphones with Remote and Mic Comparison
  10. Conclusion
  11. Ratings & Specs
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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