• SteelSeries Arctis Pro

  • HyperX Cloud II

  • How We Tested

  • Things to Consider When Buying Gaming Headsets

  • Other Gaming Headsets We Tested

  • More Articles You Might Enjoy

Our Favorite Gaming Headsets of 2020

  1. Best Overall

    SteelSeries Arctis Pro

    Pros

    • Great for gaming

    • Top-notch sound

    • Comfortable

    Cons

    • Expensive

    Skip to the full review below
  2. Best Value

    HyperX Cloud II

    Pros

    • Affordable

    • Comfortable

    • Durable

    Cons

    • Very loud

    Skip to the full review below
gaming-headphones-1
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar
Best Overall
SteelSeries Arctis Pro

If you’re going to pay over $300 for anything—let alone a gaming headset—it needs to be downright impressive. Thankfully for SteelSeries, the Arctis Pro most definitely is. One of the more comfortable gaming headsets on the market, the Arctis Pro uses a flexible suspension band to customize size, with super soft ear cups that stay comfortable even for hours—even while wearing glasses. Sure, comfort alone isn't enough of a reason to buy such an expensive headset, but the Arctis Pro doesn’t stop there. You still have to contend with wires (there are plenty of perfectly good wireless options out there these days), but if you don't mind some tethering, this one offers an awful lot.

Both music and games sound fantastic using the Arctis Pro. I played both a quiet indie game, Atma, and loud, booming matches of Overwatch while using this headset and I was pleased with both. While playing Atma, the headset balanced the quiet soundtrack with in-game sound effects, like the crunching of grass beneath my character's feet. In Overwatch, I was able to clearly distinguish my allies' voices from in-game noise, which can sometimes be a struggle for me. That's largely thanks to the mixer that comes with the SteelSeries. For me, the mixer made for a perfectly customizable balance between game and chat.

From there, customization extends into the equalizer which lets you change frequencies without any extra software. It's a pricey headset, but where that money is going is clear. Better still, you can find the Arctis Pro for a lot less money online these days, making it an easy choice for serious gamers. Just note that this one doesn't work with Xbox consoles—for that, you'll need to check out the SteelSeries Arctis 9X below.

Pros

  • Great for gaming

  • Top-notch sound

  • Comfortable

Cons

  • Expensive

HyperX Cloud
Credit: Reviewed.com / Jackson Ruckar
Best Value
HyperX Cloud II

HyperX's new and improved Cloud II headset replaces the original Cloud, our previous top pick. It's extremely comfortable and comes packaged with leatherette or velour ear cups, an audio control box, and a detachable mic. The aluminum body is strong, and durable enough to last a good long while if you plan on taking your gaming on the go. It's a wired headset, but I won't hold that against it.

When it comes down to the audio performance, you'll need to be a little cautious. These things are explosively loud—if you're not careful they could destroy your ears. But once you've dialed in the correct volume, you're left with a headset that delivers every note and range of your game audio with beautifully detailed clarity.

I was constantly surprised by new sound effects I heard while playing Overwatch, a game I've logged well over 400 hours on. That's not to mention the detachable mic that still left me impressed. One of the best things about this headset, though, is that it's compatible with PC, PS4, and Xbox One—so no matter what your gaming system of choice is, the Cloud II will do the job.

Pros

  • Affordable

  • Comfortable

  • Durable

Cons

  • Very loud

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How We Tested

The Testers

Nicole Carpenter was a freelance video game and tech reporter from Massachusetts who now works at Polygon. She plays a lot of video games—a perk of the gig that she loves—and has been working in the industry for over five years, both covering the video game industry and reviewing the technology that goes along with it. She's a lifelong competitively-minded gamer who is always looking for a headset that can provide her with the sound I needed and comfort that lasts a long time.

Lee Neikirk is Reviewed's Home Theater Editor, and has been reviewing consumer tech products for almost a decade. He's been playing video games since since he was five years old, and holds a degree in music performance. A huge fan of sound design in games with a passion for video game music, he's especially invested in the functionality and audio quality of gaming headsets.

The Tests

Nicole: Primarily, I'm playing Blizzard Entertainment's Overwatch, a first-person shooter with an emphasis on team play. (In particular, I'm trying to level up my alternate account to get a new in-game rating.) I'm a support main. I primarily play Zenyatta, and it's important to me to have a clear view of what's going on around me. I listen for ultimate cues from the enemy team so I know when to protect or fight.

But I also like playing indie games, quieter games with emotional soundtracks. During testing, I played Jo-Mei Games' Sea of Solitudeand a bit of Team Atma's Atma. In all three games, sound is important in creating an atmosphere. In Overwatch, that atmosphere can mean winning or losing. But in story-based games, that sound is essential in the emotional drive of the game.

Sound is super important, but a big part of competitive video games is communication. One of my biggest gaming pet peeves is being able to hear people breathing into the microphone — and it's even worse when it's someone complaining that it's me. During testing, it was important to me to ensure that game sound works just as well as the communication system.

Lee: I tested headsets that were compatible with PC, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox One, so that required a fairly eclectic selection of titles: primarily Sea of Thieves on PC; Gears 5 and GTA Online on Xbox One; and Mario Kart 8 and Animal Crossing: New Horizons on Nintendo Switch are what I played most.

I tend to place a big emphasis on the balance between chat volume and a game's music and sound effects when evaluating gaming headphones. I don't want to be unable to hear or communicate with my teammates, but neither do I want valuable feedback effects or music to be too quiet.

However, I'm also a stickler for lightweight sets that boast long-term comfort: I don't want to feel like I have to stop playing something just because my neck is sore or my ears are overheated.

Things to Consider When Buying Gaming Headsets

While gaming headphones are still headphones, gamers typically have a different set of priorities than audiophiles listening to music on the go. Even within the gamer population, different gaming headsets will be more or less useful, depending on their preferred gaming genre. Once you've decided that regular headphones are no longer adequate for an hours-long session of Red Dead Redemption 2, here are a few features that can help you make your decision.

Sound Quality—Are you playing games that mainly soundtrack music? Or can your headphones' transmission of audio cues make or break your ability to level up? If you're playing online with friends, can you hear their instructions and comments? If you're constantly listening for gunshots or footsteps, you may want to invest in a pair of headphones that emphasize bass tones; otherwise, if you need to hear more than audio cues, it's best to get headphones that have a more expansive sound profile.

Microphone—Having a high-quality mic is key, especially if you're playing with teammates. The best microphones should cut out any electric humming or ambient noise, and have voice clarity that is comparable to talking to someone on a cell phone when you both have great reception. Ideally, the microphone is also adjustable so that you can get it at just the right distance from your mouth so that it doesn't transmit your breathing more than your voice.

Comfort—Listen, we've all gone on gaming binges before, but you can't really enjoy a gaming marathon if your headset starts squishing your head and ears after only a couple of hours. The headphones themselves should be adjustable so that you're not stuck with ill-fitting headphones. Thick ear pads, a padded headband, and a relatively lightweight are necessities for a pair of gaming headsets if you're going to be spending quality time in front of your TV or computer.

Isolation—Gaming can be a form of escapism; to ensure that you're really escaping, your headphones should really block out ambient noise, both so you can better hear what's going on in the game, and so that the outside world doesn't distract you from your task. Granted, in an emergency, it's best to be able to hear some of the outside world, but gaming headphones should ideally be able to block out humming from air conditioners, refrigerators, and other appliances.

Cable/Wireless Connection—If your gaming headsets have a cable, it should be a long cable (ideally, longer than 10 feet). While it's easier when you're gaming on your computer, when you're gaming on TV screen, you're typically not sitting right up in front of it, like you would with a computer. Having a long cable allows you to sit at a comfortable distance from your gaming system. If, on the other hand, you prefer to be cable-free, then you may prefer wireless gaming headphones. Wireless headsets usually have either a USB connector that you plug in, or are connected over Bluetooth. Keep in mind that wireless headphones have a battery life, and that you may want to keep an eye on said battery life, lest they cut out at a key point in your gaming experience.

Platform—Before you lay down cash for a pair of gaming headphones, make sure they're compatible with your game system. Some brands have different products for different platforms, and others just have a regular headphone jack that can be plugged into any system. Additionally, some features may not work equally well across all platforms.


Other Gaming Headsets We Tested

SteelSeries Arctis 9X

SteelSeries Arctis 9X is probably the best wireless Xbox One headset that I've tried. It's unique for a few reasons, the first of which is its ease of use: the headset has a built-in Xbox wireless adapter, which means it connects seamlessly like a controller. But it also has simultaneous Bluetooth integration so it can be connected to your phone there and to the Xbox One with the wireless Xbox adapter—listen to music or take a call while doing mundane tasks in an expansive, open-world game like Red Dead Redemption. ("Old Town Road," anyone?)

It works wirelessly on PC, too, but SteelSeries suggests using a USB Xbox wireless adapter for that. I really didn’t have any problems with Bluetooth, though I thought the microphone quality may have decreased over Bluetooth. My friends complained about my voice cutting out while using it on PC. That said, any sound quality difference from Bluetooth to using it wirelessly on Xbox One was negligible. Bass, in particular, stood out: in really intense matches, rich booms rang clear over most other sounds.

I was also impressed by the comfort—in fact, I wouldn’t hesitate to say this is the most comfortable console headset I've ever worn. Using a flexible suspension band like in the Arctis Pro, rather than something fixed, it feels light on my head. It doesn't squeeze my glasses to my face but still feels secure, like it won't shake loose. The band for the Arctis 9X is only slightly different than the Arctis Pro, and that's in the color: for the Xbox One-optimized 9X, the headset takes on the console's signature green details on the band. It's understated, though, and not garish.

Pros

  • Great for Xbox

  • Extremely comfortable

Cons

  • Expensive

  • Can be finicky with PC

Epos Sennheiser GSP 670

The wireless Epos | Sennheiser GSP 670 is one of the most premium products we've tested, and its price frankly may put it out of reach for the average gamers. This one is as geared towards eSports professionals as it is deep-pocket audiophiles, but for the price you're getting one heck of a package: a highly durable, angular design aesthetic; customizable 7.1 surround sound via Epos' Gaming Suite software; Sennheiser's storied handling of audio quality; and compatibility with pretty much any mobile device (phone/tablet), PC, or PS4. Sorry, Xboxers—this is yet another one that doesn't work with Microsoft's home consoles.

I'd be remiss if I didn't first and foremost mention the quality of the audio here. While the GSP 670s aren't head and shoulders above everything on the list (they're not our favorites, actually), they do sound a lot better than the average gaming headphones. On the downside, they're bulky and heavy—it's almost impossible to forget they're on your head. If you're partial to lighter, more minimalist gaming headphones, these might not be your top choice.

On the other hand, the considerable size and build quality allows for a robust set of on-set controls, which made it easy to adjust game/chat volume during use. Alongside the solid audio quality here, I also greatly enjoyed the microphone's sensitive and voice transference. While you're not getting a noise canceling mic like with some newer gaming headsets, no one I chatted with had any complaints about my voice quality.

As for surround sound, Epos' Gaming Suite software is simple enough once you get the hang of it, but does require a learning curve—and I recommend using it if you want to extract the maximum value from these headphones. Overall, while these are a bit on the pricy side, Epos/Sennheiser pack in enough quality and features that the GSP 670 feel like a real step up from the average gaming headset.

Pros

  • Very durable

  • Great sound

Cons

  • Expensive

  • Bulky, heavy

Razer Nari Ultimate

I’m guessing the first thing you'll notice about the Razer Nari Ultimate headset is its size: these things are massive. The cups are almost comically oversized, and you can feel it when you wear it. They're heavy, and it was hard to ignore the sheer weight on my head. Even with the freedom of wirelessness, they may leave you feeling weighted down.

However, the reason they're so big is because there's a lot going on in there. The Nari Ultimate uses THX spatial audio to create a "360° sphere" of sound, and it works great. Sound always felt crisp and precise. I was impressed by the accuracy of sound in Overwatch, able to place enemies in the area by sound. But I was most impressed when playing Jo-Mei Games' Sea of Solitude. It's a much quieter game that emphasizes its emotional soundtrack; with the Nari Ultimate headphones, I felt immersed in the swell of the music — it was almost good enough that I forgot the heft of the headset on my head.

Razer stuffed in a system called "HyperSense" in the Nari Ultimate headset. This feature uses haptic technology to let players "feel" the sound with vibrations. It feels like an unnecessary feature that was more distraction than immersion. Just keep in mind, this is yet another headset that's compatible with PC and PS4, but not Xbox.

Pros

  • Clear, accurate sound

  • Interesting features

Cons

  • Absolute units

HyperX Cloud Alpha S

The HyperX Cloud Alpha S is a top-notch choice from HyperX, a brand that produces an almost impossible-to-keep-track-of array of gaming headsets. Take it from me: the Alpha S is one of the good ones (for PC and PS4—this is another no-Xbox option).

Available in blue, black, or red, the Alpha S gives you a durable, comfortable fit, great sound, a reliable microphone, and—perhaps best of all—a software-based virtual 7.1 surround sound function that lends some serious atmosphere to whatever game you're playing. I found myself legitimately impressed after booting up the 7.1-channel mode, even without doing any tweaking: the rolling, stormy ocean in Sea of Thieves suddenly seemed to be crashing and breaking all around me, just with the push of a button.

Is this "modeled" surround sound perfect? No—it almost never is. But for what you're paying for these, it's a rock-solid addition to gaming headphones that already offer a healthy combination of design, comfort, and aduio quality.

The one thing you're not getting with the Cloud Alpha S headset is wirelessness: these are USB/wired only, so you'll have to look elsewhere (perhaps the Cloud Flight S?) if you're hoping to ditch the wires altogether. However, not only does the USB connection mean you don't have to worry about battery life, and the in-line control device (a rectangle with buttons for volume adjustment, muting the mic, triggering the 7.1 emulator, and so on) is much easier to learn than the usual wireless headset controls.

Unless you really need a wireless headset, this one is excellent for what you're paying, and sleek, compact, durable, and comfortable enough to wear all day (or all night, if that's your style).

Pros

  • Great sound

  • Virtual 7.1 is very effective

Cons

  • Wired only

  • PC, PS4 only

Logitech G635

The Logitech G635 is a PC gamer's headset. While others on this list have a more subtle appearance, this headset really leans into the design details stereotypically attributed to gaming products: LED lights, bold and maximal design, and tons of buttons. You're not getting wireless functionality here, but it nails things otherwise.

It makes for a sturdy and absolutely eye-catching headset, but perhaps not eye-catching in the right way—depending on your style. I personally prefer minimal design, and I can't figure out why anyone would want LED lighting on a headset that the user cannot see or experience, but maybe that means this product isn't for me. I'm sure that, paired with Logitech's line of gamer stuff, all chock full of lights, it creates a cohesive environment.

Alongside the strips of LED lighting, the Logitech G635 has three programmable buttons (and they feel great, with a very distinct tactile click), a wireless on/off switch, a quick-mute button, and a volume wheel. They're all easily accessible, but I don't know if there's a real, practical use for the extra buttons.

Also tucked away on the left cup is a flip microphone. On paper, it's pretty cool—but in practice, it's kind of awkward. There's a retractable piece that adds some length and flexibility, but I had a hard time keeping that part where I wanted it. Also on the left cup is the wireless USB adapter, hidden under a magnetic cover. It's neat that all these details are all embedded in the headset itself to ensure you've always got what you need.

As someone who wears glasses, I found the headset uncomfortable—it clamped onto my head with enough force to to be a bit painful in conjunction with my glasses. It's a shame, because the headset sounds lovely. I was able to hear all the distinct sounds while playing Overwatch (have you guessed what my game of choice is?), from the character voice lines to the small, atmospheric sounds of a character's body moving through the world.

Pros

  • Sturdy

  • Handsome

  • LEDs!

Cons

  • Superfluous buttons

  • Uncomfortable with glasses

Razer Kraken Ultimate

This simple wired USB headset from Razer seems like it could be a great choice for a lot of gamers. The pricing is quite reasonable, and you’re getting a lot of flash for what you’re paying.

Of course, flash comes standard with a lot of Razer products and peripherals. If the company tends to make you think of multi-color RGB LEDs first and foremost, you’ll be extra happy to know that the Kraken Ultimate doesn’t break tradition: the rears of both ear cups are emblazoned with Razer’s green snake logo, and also glow in a rainbow of colors that’s programmable with Razer’s RGB LED-controlling Synapse software.

Of course, that’s all fine and dandy, but what really makes the Kraken Ultimate worth its salt is the audio and microphone fidelity. This headset didn’t blow me away in any one area performance-wise, but it’s definitely not lacking in anything, either. Game sound effects register well within the surround sound environment (powered by THX Spatial and 7.1-channel emulation), and music sounds very warm and robust in the mids and low end.

The Kraken Ultimate aren’t the best-sounding headphones I’ve ever used, but they definitely get the job done. You may be paying a little more here for the flashy design, but we're also big fans of the ANC (active noise canceling) equipped microphone, which did (according to the folks I chatted with, anyway) effectively transmit my voice—and not much else. This is yet another great headset that's not available for Xbox—it's PC or PS4 here yet again.

Pros

  • Classic Razer design

  • Comfortable

  • ANC mic works well

Cons

  • Sound is decent, not great

Turtle Beach Stealth 700

Like the Arctis 9X, the Turtle Beach Stealth 700 is a wireless headset designed for the Xbox One. For just over $100, it's a decent headset that's low on frills and easy-to-use. You won't get the build or audio quality of the higher-end headsets here, but this does a good job for the price.

I found the Turtle Beach Stealth 700 earcups to be a little harder than the cushions on other headsets, but not necessarily uncomfortable. The firm cups helped lend the headset an air of stability without making it overly heavy or tight. These are the on-ear style, too, which made them easier to use with my glasses—they weren't pushed tight to my head. Another neat little feature is the mic, which is designed to mute automatically when it's flipped up. I like that there's no need to fiddle with buttons if you need to mute the mic for any reason. But because the mic needs to be able to flip up, the microphone arm is really short. It didn't seem to impact how people heard me, though, which surprised me.

Pros

  • Cool physical features

  • Xbox compatible

Cons

  • A bit rigid from a comfort perspective

HyperX Cloud Flight S

If you love the aesthetic of the HyperX Cloud Alpha S but hate the idea of being tethered by wires, the HyperX Cloud Flight S might be just what you're looking for. It's a bit more expensive than its wired counterpart, but you're still getting all of the same great features as HyperX's wired models—cushy padding, solid sound, and a reliable microphone—on top of the ability to ditch the wires.

This one's a little different from the usual wireless gaming headset, however. It isn't technically a Bluetooth device (which threw me for a loop when I was first setting it up), but instead uses 2.4GHz wireless adapting a la a wireless mouse or keyboard. While this isn't that outlandish in the realm of gaming headsets, it does mean these won't double as a pair of Bluetooth headphones to be used with any old mobile device. You'll have to plug a USB dongle into your PC or PS4 (again, sorry Xbox fans, this one doesn't work for you).

But once you've got the Cloud Flight S properly "up and running," so to speak, I think most people will really enjoy using it. There's no latency or stuttering to speak of (and I would hope not at this price point), and music and sound effects sound balanced and clear. You're also getting a pretty hefty amount of upgrades here compared to the original Cloud Flight: Qi wireless charging, 7.1 surround sound, fairly intuitive on-cup controls, and so on—you just aren't getting the LED lighting of the other Cloud Flight variants.

We gave this model a CES Editor's Choice award for a reason—it's a very solid, comfortable wireless headset. While it's not the most valuable wireless option on the list, it's still pretty darn good, especially if you're hungry for convenience features like Qi charging.

Pros

  • Comfortable

  • Good sound

  • Qi-compatible

Cons

  • A bit expensive

Epos Sennheiser GSP 370

The Epos | Sennheiser GSP 370 is a more affordable version of the fairly high-end GSP 670—it's still a bit pricy, but less so than its big brother. You're really getting a less fancy version of the quite fancy 670: same fairly robust Sennheiser sound, but some notable differences in terms of sound and microphone frequency fidelity. You're also still getting the option of wireless, which is definitely an added bonus.

Essentially, the GSP 670 covers a wider range of frequencies: 10Hz (compared to the 370's 20Hz) to 23kHz (compared to the 370's 20kHz). While this might seem negligible to the uninitiated, it does reflect the basic quality difference in the drivers and frequency possibilities between the two units. This also has a marked effect on battery life: during testing, both headsets lasted plenty long enough for full gaming sessions, but the 370 actually lasted longer—a testament to the increased fidelity of the 670's drivers, to be sure.

However, even with the audio quality you're sacrificing by stepping down from the 670 to the 370, the 370 is still a solid gaming headset in its own right. While not as hulking and plush-padded as the more expensive model, it's still plenty comfortable, and lots of folks may actually prefer the lighter weight. Like the 670, it's still a bit boring from a design perspective: angular gunmetal, huzzah.

But if you're more worried about pure sound/microphone quality than LEDs, noise-canceling mics, and so on, the GSP 370 is a simple, effective choice.

Pros

  • Great sound

  • Comfortable

Cons

  • Expensive

  • Boring design

Razer Hammerhead True Wireless

The Razer Hammerhead might just be the only gaming-focused true wireless earbuds on the market, and it's something that definitely helps them stand out within the wild jungle of bulky over-ear headphones.

These are great if you really want a true wireless option for playing games on a huge range of devices—smartphone, tablet, PC, really anything that standard wireless Bluetooth headphones will work with. However, for their unique form factor and device flexibility, there are some things about the Hammerhead I'm personally not crazy about.

For one, the Hammerheads aren't very comfortable compared to a lot of other true wireless headphones I've tried. They're rigid, and sit in your ears with the same kind of plasticky uncomfortableness as the original Apple earbuds. They also seem to have some Bluetooth issues from time to time—I found more than once that only one of the two 'buds had completed the Bluetooth connection, and had to repair a few times to get them both working.

However, design and connection issues aside, they are just about the only gaming-facing option of this type on the market, and I could see certain gamers being hugely enamored with the ability to use a Razer-branded product and ecosystem in such a portable, on-the-go kind of way. If you're interested, though, try to at least give these a spin before you fully commit: if you find them uncomfortable, no amount of convenience is going to make up for that at the end of the day.

Pros

  • Highly portable

  • Affordable

Cons

  • Uncomfortable

  • Bluetooth can be finicky

Meet the testers

Lee Neikirk

Lee Neikirk

Editor

@Koanshark

Lee has been Reviewed's point person for most television and home theater products since 2012. Lee received Level II certification in TV calibration from the Imaging Science Foundation in 2013. As Editor of the Home Theater vertical, Lee oversees reviews of TVs, monitors, soundbars, and Bluetooth speakers. He also reviews headphones, and has a background in music performance.

See all of Lee Neikirk's reviews
Nicole Carpenter

Nicole Carpenter

Contributing Writer

Nicole Carpenter is a reporter and reviewer based out of Massachusetts. For the past few years, she’s specialized in the technology and gaming sectors, reviewing a number of different headphones with a specialty in gaming gear.

See all of Nicole Carpenter's reviews

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