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A person holds a cordless leaf blower while three others sit on a table Credit: Reviewed / Kevin Kavanaugh

The Best Cordless Leaf Blowers of 2022

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A person holds a cordless leaf blower while three others sit on a table Credit: Reviewed / Kevin Kavanaugh

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1
Editor's Choice Product image of Ego Power+ LB7654
Best Overall

Ego Power+ LB7654

If you need a cordless blower to access the back corners of your yard, the Ego Power+ LB7654 is your best bet. Read More

Pros

  • Powerful
  • Long run time

Cons

  • Heavy
  • Loud
2
Editor's Choice Product image of Kobalt KHB 3040-06
Best Value

Kobalt KHB 3040-06

The Kobalt KHB 3040-06 moved more leaves and debris more quickly than any other cordless blower in our testing. Read More

Pros

  • Moves debris quickly
  • Easy to carry

Cons

  • Loud
  • Relatively short running time
3
Product image of Ego Power+ LB6504

Ego Power+ LB6504

Blowing 650 cubic feet of air per minute, this is perfect for most medium to large yards and shares the intuitive design of the Ego Power+ LB7654. Read More

Pros

  • Can use around landscaping without disturbing it
  • Decent run time

Cons

  • Heavy
  • Very loud
4
Product image of Ryobi RY40407BTLVNM

Ryobi RY40407BTLVNM

This Ryobi model seemed under-powered compared to other corded models, but it blew well on the Turbo setting—the extra-power button. Read More

Pros

  • Turbo mode is powerful
  • Quiet

Cons

  • Heavy and awkward to carry
5
Product image of Greenworks Pro BL60L2510

Greenworks Pro BL60L2510

The Greenworks performance was much weaker than most of the other leaf blowers; it couldn’t blow leaves, acorns, and other debris very far. Read More

Pros

  • Quiet
  • Long-lasting battery

Cons

  • Weak performance

Whether you're dealing with lawn debris, acorns, or a never-ending torrent of falling leaves, a reliable leaf blower is a must-have for a homeowner. A great leaf blower can clean up your yard, deck, and garden areas in less time and with less effort than hand tools like rakes and brooms.

We've spent hours testing the best leaf blowers on the market, including corded electric models, and found the Ego Power+ LB7654 (available at Amazon for $319.00) is the best cordless blower you can buy. If you hate lugging an extension cord around—or need something that can get to hard-to-reach spaces—this cordless leaf blower can help get the job done with far less fuss.

For another great cordless leaf blower that has an even better price, check out the Kobalt KHB 3040-06 (available at Lowe's), our choice for Best Value.

We've put all the models here through their paces, blowing leaves, pine needles, acorns, and dust off dozens of obstacles. Our top picks do the best job of balancing power, battery life, and weight to deliver the cord-free leaf blower you've been looking for.

These are the best cordless leaf blowers we've tested, ranked in order:

  1. Ego Power+ LB7654
  2. Kobalt KHB 3040-06
  3. Ego Power+ LB6504
  4. Ryobi RY4047VNM
  5. Greenworks BL60L2510
  6. Ryobi RY40480
  7. Hoover OnePwr Cordless High Performance Blower
  8. Litheli U1BR21103
The Ego Power+ LB7654 leaf blower sits on grass
Credit: Reviewed / Kevin Kavanaugh

The Ego Power+ LB7654 is the best cordless leaf blower we've tested.

Best Overall
Ego Power+ LB7654

Power:
If you need a cordless blower to access the back corners of your yard, the high-powered Ego Power+ LB7654 is your best bet. This blower can move 765 cubic feet of air per minute and you can feel that power as soon as you hit the Thrust button.

It has an intuitive design with buttons placed where the hand naturally falls. The speed control button has a tab that makes one-handed operation easy. Most of our tests were conducted on the low setting, as it has plenty of power to accomplish a variety of yard jobs.

The Thrust power button proved most effective at clearing out large, embedded piles of leaves, but that same power can also eliminate most of your mulch if you're not careful. It's all the power you need to take care of a large yard.

Comfort:
With the battery attached, the Ego LB7654 is well balanced. The motor is located in the middle of the blower and is well protected from pant legs and windbreakers. The design is streamlined and well thought out.

The only drawback to its design is the size of the battery. With the battery attached, the blower weighs in at a hefty 9.6 pounds. There are hooks on the blower for a shoulder strap, but no straps were included. Carrying this blower around the yard could become a chore in itself.

Noise:
The Ego registered 86 decibels on the lowest setting, so it is at the upper range of noise levels for a yard tool. This machine is perfect for larger yards where there is more room between homes.

Battery:
At 30 minutes, the Ego LB7654 had the best run-time of the cordless blowers we tested.

Pros

  • Powerful

  • Long run time

Cons

  • Heavy

  • Loud

Kobalt KHB 3040-06
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

The Kobalt is a great cordless leaf blower and an excellent value.

Best Value
Kobalt KHB 3040-06

Power:
Formerly our top cordless pick, the Kobalt KHB 3040-06 moves leaves and debris more quickly than most other cordless blowers in our testing, blowing out an estimated 480 CFM. It also has a variable-speed trigger and a Turbo button for increasing power to dislodge stubborn wet leaves. And at a fraction of the price as our Best Overall pick, it's a great budget buy, as well.

Comfort:
The Kobalt KHB 3040-06 also feels well-balanced and easy to carry, unlike other cordless models which are back-heavy due to battery weight.

Noise:
Close up, it sounds like a household vacuum, not a gigantic grinding machine, although it isn’t quiet. Kobalt representatives say it has a noise rating of under 65 decibels at 50 feet, which means it meets most leaf blower noise laws. Of course, it’s much noisier for the person operating it, so wear ear protection to prevent hearing loss.

Battery:
The one drawback to the Kobalt KHB 3040-06 is its relatively short running time. With the blower set on minimum power, the Kobalt ran for 16 minutes, 30 seconds on its lowest setting. If you’re thinking of running your blower continuously for a longer span, consider buying an extra battery.

Pros

  • Moves debris quickly

  • Easy to carry

Cons

  • Loud

  • Relatively short running time


Other Cordless Leaf Blowers We Tested

Product image of Ego Power+ LB6504
Ego Power+ LB6504

Power:
Blowing 650 cubic feet of air per minute, this is perfect for most medium to large yards and shares the intuitive design of the Ego Power+ LB7654. However, this model’s speed control button does not have a tab and we found that controlling the speed took two hands.

Most of our tests were conducted on the low setting, as it has plenty of power to accomplish a variety of yard jobs. The Thrust power button proved quite capable at clearing out large, embedded piles of leaves. This model is the same size and weight of the LB7654, and we found this blower to be quite capable even with its lower CFM.

Comfort:
Like the LB7654, the Ego LB6504 is well balanced. The motor is located in the middle of the blower and is well-protected from pant legs and windbreakers. The Ego design is streamlined and well thought out.

Like the LB7654, the only drawback to its design is the size of the battery. With the battery attached, the blower weighs in at a hefty 9.6 pounds. There are hooks on the blower for a shoulder strap, but no straps were included.

Noise:
The Ego registered 92 decibels on the lowest setting and was the loudest blower we tested. The added noise is one more reason to consider the more powerful and quieter LB7654.

Battery:
At 24 minutes, the Ego LB6504 had one of the best run-times of the cordless blowers we tested.

Pros

  • Can use around landscaping without disturbing it

  • Decent run time

Cons

  • Heavy

  • Very loud

Product image of Ryobi RY40407BTLVNM
Ryobi RY40407BTLVNM

Power:
This Ryobi model seemed under-powered compared to corded models, despite manufacturer-advertised ratings of 550 CFM. It blew well on the Turbo mode, but it didn’t pick up and move leaves the way the Kobalt model did.

Given that the battery lasted less than 20 minutes on the lowest setting, don’t count on using that Turbo setting very much unless you have a second battery ready.

Comfort:
This Ryobi felt heavy and awkward, thanks largely to a battery that weighs more than 3 pounds and is positioned on top of the leaf blower.

It’s also designed with the fan on the back of the leaf blower, behind the handle, where it can suck in clothing. The back fan could become an annoyance or a safety hazard.

Noise:
The RY40407VNM Whisper model claims to be “the industry’s quietest handheld blower,” producing 59 decibels at 50 feet. It seems to achieve this lower rating via a layer of foam on the interior of the air tube. It’s quieter at a distance, but subjectively, it doesn’t seem much quieter for the operator.

Battery:
In our testing, the RY40407VNM’s battery lasted for 18 minutes, 20 seconds on the lowest setting. It’s not terrible, but if you have a larger yard, you’ll want to invest in a second battery.

Pros

  • Turbo mode is powerful

  • Quiet

Cons

  • Heavy and awkward to carry

Product image of Greenworks Pro BL60L2510
Greenworks Pro BL60L2510

Power:
Although the manufacturer rates the Greenworks BL60L2510 as moving 470 CFM, its performance was much weaker than most of the other leaf blowers in our sample. It simply couldn’t blow leaves, acorns, and other debris very far or very fast. In addition, it vibrates worryingly during use.

Comfort:
At a little over 8 pounds, the Greenworks BL60L2510 wasn’t the lightest blower we tested, but it wasn’t the heaviest either. It was the only cordless blower in our sample that had an extra on/off switch in addition to the speed-adjustment dial, which can be either annoying or reassuring.

Noise:
The Greenworks BL60L2510 makes a lower-pitched noise than many other nozzles, and it is less annoying than some of the whinier models. Rated at 65 decibels, it is acceptably quiet by most municipal leaf blower sound standards.

Battery:
The Greenworks BL60L2510 was one of the longest-lasting in our sample, clocking 24 minutes, 40 seconds on the lowest setting. If you want to use a higher setting to blow your leaves more effectively, consider investing in an extra battery.

Pros

  • Quiet

  • Long-lasting battery

Cons

  • Weak performance

Product image of Ryobi RY40480VNM
Ryobi RY40480VNM

Power:
Much like the Ryobi RY404070VNM Whisper model, the 40480VNM seemed under-powered despite an air volume measurement of 535 CFM. The main way the 40480VNM differs from the other Ryobi model is that it’s louder, producing 68 decibels of high-pitched, whiny noise at 50 feet. The Turbo setting enhanced the 40480’s performance, but not to the level of our top three models.

Comfort:
Both cordless Ryobi models we tested felt heavy and awkward thanks to a top-mounted battery that weighs more than 3 pounds. The battery puts a third of this blower’s weight right below the handle, and boosts the total weight to 9.4 pounds.

During testing, the 40480’s rear-mounted fan sucked my clothes against the back of the blower when I held the blower in front of me. No harm was done, but depending on your clothing choices and your arm position, this back fan could be a safety hazard.

Noise:
The RY 40480VNM has a noise rating of 68 decibels, and produced a loud, high-pitched whine.

Battery:
The RY40480VNM’s battery lasted a reasonable 21 minutes, 35 seconds on the lowest setting. If you’re planning on using the Turbo setting to dislodge wet leaves or gravel, you should have a second battery ready.

Pros

  • Turbo setting enhances performance

  • Solid battery life

Cons

  • Loud

  • Heavy

Product image of Hoover OnePWR BH57205
Hoover OnePWR BH57205

Power:
You won’t have to worry about blowing too many leaves out of your yard with the Hoover BH57205. Although this model lists a respectable 270 CFM and had middle-of-the-road leaf-moving force in our testing, the battery lasted less than 10 minutes before dying out.

Comfort:
Awkward and strangely heavy for a blower that’s only 6.4 pounds, the Hoover blower is hard to carry comfortably. Fortunately, the battery is weak enough that using the Hoover over a long period really isn’t an issue.

Noise:
Hoover doesn’t list an official noise rating for the BH57205, but it is very loud—noticeably louder than the other models we tested. You can do better.

Battery:
On a fully-charged battery, the Hoover gave up the ghost at a mere 8 minutes, 45 seconds. At that rate, you’ll want to get two extra batteries, and maybe an extra charger too.

Pros

  • Adequate power

Cons

  • Weak battery life

  • Awkward to carry

  • Loud

Product image of Litheli U1BR21103
Litheli U1BR21103

Power:
The Litheli U1BR21103 delivers 480 cubic feet of air per minute, which could work for most medium to small yards. It is a capable blower, but its poor design prevents it from being a good value or a good choice.

The air intake on the Litheli is located on the back side of the blower and no matter how you position your body, the blower will find your pants leg and latch on, making a most distressing sound. This design seriously inhibits the lateral movements needed to move leaves across the yard.

Comfort:
The Litheli is not a comfortable blower to use. Even though the battery is small and the blower weighs in at only 7.5 pounds, most of the weight is located in the back of the blower. It lacks balance and can be awkward to use effectively.

The tube of the blower extends for easier directional jobs, but it lacks attachments for any other applications. This blower would be a good choice for small, quick clean up jobs around the yard.

Noise:
The Litheli registered 85 decibels on the lowest setting.

Battery:
The Litheli had a decent run-time of the cordless blowers we tested: 14 minutes, 30 seconds. The battery is quite small, but it did deliver power for its duration. Unlike the Ego blowers, the Litheli’s battery only indicates its present charge if you depress the battery button.

Pros

  • Lightweight

  • Extendable tube

Cons

  • Poor design

  • Shorter run time

How We Tested Cordless Leaf Blowers

Three leaf blowers are on display leaning up a tree and laying on the forest floor.
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

Our leaf blower testing focused on how well each worked, ease of use, battery endurance, and its power and balance.

The Testers

I’m Meg Muckenhoupt, a garden writer and reviewer. I’ve been wrangling with trees, branches, leaves, and gravel for more than 20 years, and along the way I co-founded a community farm and earned a certificate in field botany. I live under a canopy of oak, pine, maple, and hickory trees, and I’ve used many different techniques for managing the leaf avalanche that engulfs my yard every fall.

And I’m Kevin Kavanaugh, a retired public school teacher who has always been intrigued by all things mechanical, be it watches, power equipment, vintage bicycles or classic cars. After I finished testing the best lawn mowers for Reviewed, I went to work leaf blowing to add to Meg’s previous findings. Aided by fellow lawn care enthusiast Ray Lane, I cleared leaves and other debris from my half-acre yard that’s surrounded by trees.

The Tests

We tested these blowers by moving piles of dry leaves across the yard and clearing the driveway and street of light debris, small sticks and sand. We further tested their power by moving large piles of leaves caught under bushes and woodpiles.

We tested cordless leaf blowers’ battery endurance by running a zip-tie around their power buttons with the speed adjustment dial turned to the lowest setting, and timing how long it took for them to run out of power. Measurements varied from 8 minutes, 45 seconds for the Hoover BH57205 to 30 minutes for the Ego Power+ LB7654.

We rated how heavy or unwieldy these blowers felt carrying them up and down a 100-foot slope, and whether they felt unbalanced. We also evaluated how easy it was to store them in a tight space, and tried out any special accessories they included.

Overall, power and speed settings were highly correlated for these blowers: The blowers that blew leaves away the fastest also blew them across the largest area and did the best job of prying up wet leaves.

How Does A Leaf Blower Work?

At heart, leaf blowers are giant hair dryers without a heater, fans mounted on an engine with a tube to direct the airflow. The major differences between leaf blowers have to do with three main factors:

  • The power of the stream of air coming out of the tube, often measured in CFM (cubic feet per minute)
  • How comfortable it is to carry them around
  • How they’re powered—by gas engines, an electric cord, or a rechargeable battery

Cordless Leaf Blower Buyer’s Guide

Kobalt leaf blower battery
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

We tested each cordless leaf blower to see how long the battery lasts on the lowest setting.

Cordless leaf blowers are powered by gas or electricity. Gas-powered leaf blowers have several disadvantages—they're noisy, they produce pollutants, and their maintenance can be difficult, to name a few. Electric leaf blowers, which are powered by a battery, provide more freedom than corded models but are limited by battery capacity.

You can read about all of our leaf blower picks in our roundup of the best leaf blowers, but you won't find gas-powered leaf blowers in either roundup. Among other things, many municipal laws prohibit them.

Here are a few things to consider when looking for a cordless leaf blower:

  • CFM: When shopping for a leaf blower, look at air volume, not airspeed. Air volume (cubic feet per minute, or CFM) tells you how much air is coming out of the blower, or how big a mass of leaves you can blow away. Airspeed (miles per hour) measures how fast the air is going, which tells you how well a blower will dislodge and lift leaves.

Look at CFM to tell if a leaf blower is supposed to clear your entire yard (at least 400 CFM) or just your deck (under 300 CFM). Airspeed is much less important to general performance.

  • Decibels: Leaf blower noise ratings show how loud the blowers are to someone standing 50 feet away. There are two numbers you should remember: 65 decibels (dB), which is the maximum allowable noise rating for leaf blowers in some municipalities; and 80 dB, the level where hearing loss can occur after extended exposure (two hours or more).

  • Battery: Most battery-powered leaf blowers will only run 15 to 20 minutes under typical conditions, and recharging times can vary depending on the surrounding temperature, how much the battery has run down, and how old the battery is. If you’re choosing a cordless model, check how much an extra battery costs.

Though a powerful leaf blower will make quicker work of your lawn than a weaker one, if your lawn is covered in leaves you likely can't clear it in less than a half hour. In almost all cases, i we recommend having an external charger and battery, to go with your cordless leaf blower, so consider a model that includes one, or that matches other battery-powered tools you already have.

Judging by product listing and reviewers’ comments, most rechargeable leaf blower batteries will take somewhere from 60 to 90 minutes to recharge, so if you just have a single battery you could turn a quick 30-minute job into a 4-hour waiting game.

Meet the testers

TJ Donegan

TJ Donegan

Executive Editor

@TJDonegan

TJ is the Executive Editor of Reviewed.com. He is a Massachusetts native and has covered electronics, cameras, TVs, smartphones, parenting, and more for Reviewed. He is from the self-styled "Cranberry Capitol of the World," which is, in fact, a real thing.

See all of TJ Donegan's reviews
Meg Muckenhoupt

Meg Muckenhoupt

Contributor

Meg Muckenhoupt is an environmental and travel writer. Her book Boston Gardens and Green Spaces (Union Park Press, 2010) is a Boston Globe Local Bestseller. Meg was awarded a certificate in Field Botany by the New England Wild Flower Society and earned degrees from Harvard and Brown University.

See all of Meg Muckenhoupt's reviews
Kevin Kavanaugh

Kevin Kavanaugh

Contributor

Kevin Kavanaugh is a retired public school teacher and a product tester for Reviewed. Kevin has been cutting lawns for just about 50 years. He has always been intrigued by all things mechanical, be it watches, power equipment, vintage bicycles, or classic cars.

See all of Kevin Kavanaugh's reviews

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