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That doesn't mean the Axxis is without tradeoffs. The biggest is that dry cycles took a very long time -- often a half hour longer than average -- and the cheapest we could find this unit online was just under $800. For that money, you could take your pick of some of the best dryers on the market. Unless you've got serious space limitations, a full-size is almost certainly a better pick.

Few dryers look this good. The glass front door gives the unit a sturdy, industrial feel.

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A two-piece lint trap folds open for cleaning, and must be replaced in the same direction it was removed. More than once, we had to take a few minutes to figure out why the lint trap wouldn't fit.

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The did a good job getting clothes bone dry, but it took quite a long time to complete that task. Since this dryer has such a small drum, it's important not to overload it as clothes tightly packed together may not have the chance to adequately tumble dry.

On the normal cycle, the dryer reached a peak temperature of 115.4 degrees in its quest to get clothes dry. An hour and 45 minutes after that quest began, the dryer finally stopped tumbling. Our test load was totally dry, but our afternoon had been spent waiting for a dryer.

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We were especially impressed with the delicates cycle. Most dryers either burn clothes to a crisp or leave them damp on this cycle. In the case of the Axxis, clothes ended up dry at a temperature just north of 111 degrees.

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After an hour and a half of drying, a bulky test load was entirely dry. A word of caution: large comforters and bundles of sheets probably won't fit in this small dryer.

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There is a quicker cycle, though it still takes 40 minutes to complete. After observing the damp test load that the dryer delivered us, it's clear why other cycles took much longer.

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There are really only three dry cycles on offer here: Permanent Press, Cotton or Timed Dry. Within those, there are options for Extra, Very, Regular or Damp Dry. There's also the ability to choose a delicates option.

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There is no way to customize individual cycles for duration, temperature or dry level.

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There are few controls on this machine: A knob to choose a cycle, a touch-sensitive button to adjust cycles for delicate fabrics and a start/stop control. There are no ways to customize cycles, and there's no timer that shows how long a cycle should take. Most frustratingly, there's no chime to let you know when a cycle is through.

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The Bosch Axxis dryer's door is solid, though not very spacious. That means it's hard to load bulky bunches of laundry inside.

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A two-piece lint trap folds open for cleaning, and must be replaced in the same direction it was removed. More than once, we had to take a few minutes to figure out why the lint trap wouldn't fit.

Lint Trap Photo

Found online for under $800, the Bosch Axxis is pricey for a dryer with average performance and long cycles -- until you consider just how few compact dryers are on the market.

Aside from that high price, the Axxis has its benefits: it can fit almost anywhere there's a 220V outlet and a vent. Its cycles do take nearly twice as long as conventional dryers, but they get clothes dry without extremely high temperatures. If you don't have a laundry room, it's also important that the Axxis feels well built and is attractive enough to stay in a kitchen, hallway or bathroom.

Don't fret if this is the biggest dryer you can put in your home. It does a good job, though it costs a lot and takes awhile. But unless you can't possibly fit a larger dryer into a space, we'd recommend skipping the Axxis.

Meet the tester

Keith Barry

Keith Barry

Former Editor in Chief, Reviewed Home

@itskeithbarry

Keith was the Editor in Chief of Reviewed's appliance and automotive sites. His work has appeared in publications such as Wired, Car & Driver, and CityLab.

See all of Keith Barry's reviews

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