However, being the biggest does have its draw backs. While still in the box, it's 31 and 7/8 inches wide which barely fits through a 32-inch. Be sure to measure the entire route from the door to laundry room, as this dryer might not fit around a weird corner or through a narrow door.

If you're looking for capacity over all else and you've got the space for it, this dryer is worth checking out.

The best way to determine how well a dryer works is to collect data on temperature and water removal. Compared to its smaller competitors, the Samsung DV56H9100EG was somewhat uneven. That's because it relies on a different philosophy than other dryers. For this Samsung, it's about how much you can fit—not how fast a load finishes.

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And in this corner, weighing in at 159 pounds...

Everything about the Samsung DV56H9100EG's design revolves around its size. The print is big, the buttons are big, and the drum is downright huge. That allows you to load up more laundry at a time—up to 32 pounds, according to Samsung. If you have a large family and find yourself doing multiple loads because you can't fit it all in at once, the DV56H9100EG is a big time saver.

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Although the size aids in increasing the efficiency of doing the laundry, it has some drawbacks. This Samsung requires more than 57 inches of clearance for the door to be open all the way. Standing side-by-side with the accompanying washer, the Samsung WF56H9100AG, the two appliances take up 60 inches of space. Measure carefully before purchasing because no ordinary laundry closet can contain these behemoths.

Size aside, the DV56H9100EG is pretty easy to use. It has a dizzying array of cycles, but they are evenly spaced out and light up when selected. The drum lights up too, so you won't have to fumble around for the light switch in a basement setting. Everything on this machine feels solid and well-built, which is expected for a machine at this price point.

We use standard 8 lb. loads of laundry to test the Normal and Delicates cycles. We wet each test load to 1.7 times its weight, and place it in a cycle along with temperature and humidity sensors.

Each Normal test that we performed took about an hour and twenty-three minutes, which is about 20 minutes longer than the average machine we've tested. In all instances, the Normal cycle removed 100% of all moisture, leaving test laundry in a wearable state. Our sensors picked up a maximum temperature of 157°F—warm enough that more delicate fabrics may begin to wear over time.

The Delicates cycle underwent the same tests. Although its results were good, this cycle had the most inconsistent run times, ranging between 18 and 37 minutes. Test laundry, on average, came out 91% dry—you'll have to hang it up to get the rest of the moisture out. We recorded a maximum temperature of 126°F, which is a bit warm, but not too hot for most fragile fabrics to handle.
The Bedding cycle test consisted of a test comforter wet to 1.5 times its weight. The cycle averaged in at about an hour and ten minutes. Comforters came out 77% dry. Our sensors picked up high temperatures of 167°F. We weren't surprised that such a large machine did such a good job drying a big comforter.

The Quick Dry cycle proved to be the most consistent. It always took 30 minutes to run. Because of the shorter run times, we used a truncated test load of four pounds wet to 1.7 times its weight. Test loads came out with 93% of the moisture removed. Sensors picked up maximum temperatures of 161°F, which is on the warmer side.

It's about how much laundry fits, not how fast it dries.

The performance of the DV56H9100 is excellent in specific ways. It bested a wet comforter, getting it 77 percent dry. That's impressive since it's considered common practice to flip a comforter and run the Bedding cycle again. This dryer also did extremely well on the Delicates cycle. It got fabrics dry without getting too hot, which can damage them.

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However, the DV56H9100EG's Normal cycle lagged behind other dryers when it came to drying a medium-sized load. The Normal cycle took, on average, an hour and twenty-three minutes to dry eight pounds of laundry. Although it did get laundry completely dry, that's a long time—especially considering that Samsung has advertised this machine as a time saver.

The claim of "Three times the laundry in one third the time" only holds up, as the small print says, if you are filling this dryer to capacity, as it's capable of washing three times as much laundry as other machines. Pound-for-pound, dryers like the Electrolux EIED50LIW are quicker. That's not to say that the Samsung DV56H9100EG is bad—in fact, it's a good dryer. However, you shouldn't expect it to blast through smaller loads in no time.

Features-wise, the DV56H9100EG has the standard higher-end Samsung fare. Beyond Wrinkle Prevent and the drum light, this dryer comes with a Rack Dry option to dry stuffed animals and shoes. Also, there's the ability to save customized cycles. Nothing new or exciting in this department.

For in-depth performance information, please visit the Science Page.

Mr. Big

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If you're doing more than three baskets of laundry a week, the Samsung DV56H9100EG will save you time. Its performance is adequate, and it will save you time as long as you fill it with laundry for every load. Otherwise, $1,600 is a lot of money to spend on a dryer.

Regardless of cost, this Samsung is a well-designed feat of laundry engineering. Its sheer scale is impressive, although that same scale may be an issue for consumers who can't fit it into their homes.

But if your philosophy is to go big, you can go no bigger than the Samsung DV56H9100EG.

Meet the testers

Jonathan Chan

Jonathan Chan

Senior Lab Technician

@ReviewedHome

Jonathan Chan currently serves as the Senior Lab Technician at Reviewed. If you clean with it, it's likely that Jon oversees its testing. Since joining the Reviewed in 2012, Jon has helped launch the company's efforts in reviewing laptops, vacuums, and outdoor gear. He thinks he's a pretty big deal. In the pursuit of data, he's plunged his hands into freezing cold water, consented to be literally dragged through the mud, and watched paint dry. Jon demands you have a nice day.

See all of Jonathan Chan's reviews
Jonathan Chan

Jonathan Chan

Senior Lab Technician

@ReviewedHome

Jonathan Chan currently serves as the Senior Lab Technician at Reviewed. If you clean with it, it's likely that Jon oversees its testing. Since joining the Reviewed in 2012, Jon has helped launch the company's efforts in reviewing laptops, vacuums, and outdoor gear. He thinks he's a pretty big deal. In the pursuit of data, he's plunged his hands into freezing cold water, consented to be literally dragged through the mud, and watched paint dry. Jon demands you have a nice day.

See all of Jonathan Chan's reviews

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We use standardized and scientific testing methods to scrutinize every product and provide you with objectively accurate results. If you’ve found different results in your own research, email us and we’ll compare notes. If it looks substantial, we’ll gladly re-test a product to try and reproduce these results. After all, peer reviews are a critical part of any scientific process.

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