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A child peeks over the top of a stroller wagon. Credit: Reviewed / Lisa Lawrence

The Best Stroller Wagons of 2022

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A child peeks over the top of a stroller wagon. Credit: Reviewed / Lisa Lawrence

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1
Editor's Choice Product image of Gladly Anthem4
Best Overall

Gladly Anthem4

The Anthem4 stroller wagon has a great turning radius, ample cup holders and kid-friendly pockets, and it’s available in a range of colors. Read More

Pros

  • Easy to clean
  • Fashionable design
  • Ample storage
  • Great canopy coverage

Cons

  • No accordion fold
  • Takes up space
2
Editor's Choice Product image of Gladly Anthem2
Best Value

Gladly Anthem2

If you invest in a car seat adapter, you can use this wagon from day one, meaning you could just skip owning a stroller all together. Read More

Pros

  • Tons of storage
  • Wheels have fenders

Cons

  • Fussy brake pedal
3
Editor's Choice Product image of Joey Stroller Wagon
Best Upgrade

Joey Stroller Wagon

The Joey Wagon can be pushed or pulled with the adjustable handle, and with air-ride tires, it can go just about everywhere. Read More

Pros

  • Handles smoothly
  • Comes with lots of accessories
  • Folds compactly

Cons

  • Difficult to fold
  • Not for kids over age 4
4
Product image of Delta Children Jeep Deluxe Wrangler Stroller Wagon

Delta Children Jeep Deluxe Wrangler Stroller Wagon

It’s great looking, comes with a convenient cooler bag, and can handle rough terrain with relative ease. Read More

Pros

  • Rugged look
  • Massive cooler bag
  • Thoughtful parent organizer

Cons

  • Canopy feels too bulky and immovable
5
Product image of Keenz 7S 2.0

Keenz 7S 2.0

One good thing about the Keenz was the sheer amount of storage it has, including built-in shoe storage, a grown-up cup holder, and a cooler bag. Read More

Pros

  • Easily accommodates four kids
  • Adjustable leatherette handles
  • Lots of storage

Cons

  • No cup holders for kids
  • Kids can't easily climb in and out

Over the past couple of years, stroller wagons have become more popular. It’s unclear why: Maybe it was the pandemic? Maybe parents want a better way to tote kids and groceries? Whatever the reasons, wagon strollers have arrived to change how parents move their kids from place to place.

With so many new stroller wagons to chose from, it can be hard for the average person to know what really works. That’s why I scrutinized every available stroller wagon on the market before testing eight of the most popular options out there.

While everyone’s personal preferences are different—i.e. Whether you like to push or pull your stroller wagon, whether your kids prefer raised seats or a flat bottom, whether your kids sit quietly or, like mine, want to get in and out of the wagon every 20 feet—I did come away from all my testing with a clear favorite that I felt exceeded my expectations at almost every turn. The Gladly Family Anthem4 (available at Amazon) is big enough to hold four toddlers, but it’s also remarkably sleek and lightweight.

If you’re looking for something smaller and more affordable, I’d recommend the Gladly Family Anthem2 (available at Amazon), which is basically identical to the Anthem4, but about two-thirds the size. It has all the style and maneuverability of the larger model, but a more compact footprint—and a lower price point.

If you’re looking for something just a little more luxe, we recommend the Joey Wagon (available on Joey) which is a two-seater, but costs just a hair more than the Anthem4. It’s got a turning radius that can’t be beat, and its sleek style and durability make it stand out from the crowd.

A child sitting in the Gladly Anthem stroller wagon adjusting the canopy.
Credit: Reviewed / Lisa Lawrence

The Gladly Anthem4 has plenty of space and ample canopy coverage.

Best Overall
Gladly Anthem4
  • Stroller weight: 42 pounds
  • Max child weight: 50 pounds
  • Max basket weight: 250 pounds
  • Seat style: Raised bench seats, with a stow-away mattress for lie-flat use
  • Folding style: Standing fold or lie flat for storage
  • Canopy style: Collapsible double canopies with breathable mesh inserts
  • Brake: Foot
  • Restraints: A 3-point safety harness in each seat
  • Perks: Parent cup holder and storage area, four child cupholders, a snack tray, and interior mesh pockets.

I’m a picky mom. I want pretty much everything I buy for my kids to work well, last forever, look cool, and I want to feel like I got maximum bang for my buck on whatever my purchase was.

Gladly Family’s Anthem4 stroller wagon not only met all those criteria, but it surpassed them. It’s got a great turning radius, ample cup holders and kid-friendly pockets, and it’s available in colors that look sleek and stylish.

I like that it’s low-profile enough that my kids can climb in and out on their own, meaning I don’t have to fuss with them between every single attraction at the zoo, based on whatever their 4-year-old whims might be. The materials feel substantial and durable, but also not swanky enough that I would feel iffy taking a hose to them after a rogue ice cream incident.

While I think it could certainly hold four kids, it’s also not overly huge, coming in at 41 inches long by 30 inches wide. At 40 pounds, it supposedly weighs a bit more than some of the other wagons I tested, but it feels lighter, perhaps because it’s easier to pick up because of the way it folds flat.

My main quibble is the brake, which I found to be more fussy than those on some of the other wagons. I like that it’s just the one piece in the middle of the wagon, rather than being on one of the front wheels, but I found myself questioning if I’d pressed it hard enough, and when I wore sandals, I’d often feel it slipping between my foot at my shoe, meaning I really had to be intentional about when I wanted to throw it down.

All that being said, it was easy to assemble, fairly user-friendly, and handled well on street surfaces. I thought the Anthem4 also handled well on loose gravel, sand, and uneven ground, and I also enjoyed that the Anthem4’s adjustable handle is a sort of hybrid between a traditional wagon handle and a stroller handle, meaning it’s comfortable to both push or pull, no matter the terrain.

Pros

  • Easy to clean

  • Fashionable design

  • Ample storage

  • Great canopy coverage

Cons

  • No accordion fold

  • Takes up space

A young child standing in a Gladly Anthem2 stroller wagon playing with the canopy.
Credit: Reviewed / Lisa Lawrence

The Gladly Anthem2 has all the features of the Anthem4, but a smaller footprint.

Best Value
Gladly Anthem2
  • Stroller weight: 40 pounds
  • Max child weight: 50 pounds
  • Max basket weight: 150 pounds
  • Seat style: Raised bench seats, with a stow-away mattress for lie-flat use
  • Folding style: Standing fold or lie flat for storage
  • Canopy style: Collapsible double canopies with breathable mesh inserts
  • Brake: Foot
  • Restraints: A 3-point safety harness in each seat
  • Perks: Parent cup holder and storage area, two child cupholders, a snack tray, and interior mesh pockets.

While I tested wagons that were cheaper than the Anthem2, I generally found most of them lacking in some respect. I genuinely feel like one would be wise to spend more on the Anthem2, especially if you’re planning on using this wagon throughout your child’s formative years. If you invest in the car seat adapter, you can use this wagon from day one, meaning you could just skip owning a stroller—or a double stroller—all together.

Given that the Anthem2 is basically the same wagon as the Anthem4, just smaller, I really couldn’t find much fault in it. My one quibble is that it only folds flat, meaning that if you’re driving a sedan, you might want to take stock of how much stuff you really need to have in your trunk if you’re also planning on throwing this wagon into the mix.

Pros

  • Tons of storage

  • Wheels have fenders

Cons

  • Fussy brake pedal

A Joey stroller wagon outside in front of a hedge.
Credit: Reviewed / Lisa Lawrence

For a more luxurious ride, you can't go wrong with the Joey Wagon.

Best Upgrade
Joey Stroller Wagon
  • Stroller weight: 37 pounds, including fabric
  • Max child weight: 55 pounds
  • Seat style: Raised bench seats, but no mattress
  • Folding style: Standing fold or lie flat for storage
  • Canopy style: One UPF 50+ collapsible canopy included. Can purchase a second one separately
  • Brake: Foot
  • Restraints: A 3-point safety harness in each seat
  • Perks: Mesh footwell, storage basket, key slot, snack tray, and big cup holder

The Joey Wagon isn’t cheap, but if you’re looking for a sleek and stylish wagon that can turn on a dime, this could be the pick for you. I liked its relatively small footprint, and how easy it was to lift.

While my husband didn’t like the button you had to click on the wagon’s handle to make the lever go up and down, I didn’t mind it once I figured out where not to put my hand while we were walking.

The one thing I will say about the Joey Wagon is that, for something that’s fairly pricey, it certainly doesn’t come with a lot of perks. Only one canopy is included in the purchase, which is fine if you just have one kid, but if you have two or you want full bucket coverage, you’re going to have to buy a second one.

The cup holder and snack tray is nice, but given the wagon’s smaller size, if you have older kids, their knees might bang into it, making more of a mess than using the tray is really worth.

Pros

  • Handles smoothly

  • Comes with lots of accessories

  • Folds compactly

Cons

  • Difficult to fold

  • Not for kids over age 4


Other Stroller Wagons We Tested

Product image of Delta Children Jeep Deluxe Wrangler Stroller Wagon
Delta Children Jeep Deluxe Wrangler Stroller Wagon
  • Stroller weight: 46.2 pounds
  • Max child weight: 55 pounds
  • Max basket weight: 110 pounds
  • Seat style: No seats in “wagon mode.” Can insert seats with 5-point-harness for “stroller mode”
  • Folding style: Folds in half for more compact storage
  • Canopy style: Umbrella style over the whole basket
  • Brake: One step parking brake
  • Restraints: A 5-point safety harness in each seat
  • Perks: Detachable cooler bag holds up to 16 cans or 15 pounds. Parent organizer with three storage compartments and front zipper pocket. Parent cup holder.

A lot of parents like this Jeep wagon stroller, and I can see why: It’s great looking, comes with a convenient cooler bag, and can handle rough terrain with relative ease. Compared to all the other stroller wagons I tested, though, I didn’t think it had the smoothest moves, and I didn’t feel that the turning radius was tight enough for my liking.

While I liked that its one-piece large canopy gave my kids a bunch of sun coverage and included roll down shades for even more UV protection, I felt like it blocked my view of my kids while I pushed them around. Also, because I’ve got the kind of kids who want to poke around and test everything in their vicinity that meant that I was constantly being asked to roll the shades up and down, something that they couldn’t just do on their own.

Additionally, with this type of canopy, if you decide you don’t want to use it halfway through an outing, the only place to put it is in the storage pocket, and that space is precious enough as is.

Pros

  • Rugged look

  • Massive cooler bag

  • Thoughtful parent organizer

Cons

  • Canopy feels too bulky and immovable

Product image of Keenz 7S 2.0
Keenz 7S 2.0
  • Stroller weight: 32 pounds
  • Max child weight: 55 pounds
  • Max basket weight: 300 pounds
  • Folding style: Folds in half for more compact storage
  • Canopy style: Umbrella style over the whole basket
  • Brake: One step parking brake
  • Restraints: A 5-point safety harness in each seat
  • Perks: Side drapes on the canopy. Built in shoe storage. Included cup holder, cooler bag, canopy storage bag, and storage cover.

I get ads for Keenz wagons all the time on Instagram, so I was excited to try one, thinking it would be some next level game changer that I needed in my life. In actuality, it ended up being not ideal for my growing kids, who, again, love getting in and out of a wagon.

Some parents may like that the wagon is higher off the ground than most, but I generally found it to be less than desirable, especially with the attached canopy blocking a lot of my rolling view.

My Keenz 7S came packed with a set of super beefy all-terrain wheels, which came in handy on hikes, but we’re not incredibly outdoorsy, unfortunately, so the long-term handiness of those was kind of lost on me.

One good thing about the Keenz was the sheer amount of storage it has, including built-in shoe storage, a grown-up cup holder, and a cooler bag. What it didn’t have, though, was integrated cup holders built into the inside of the wagon, meaning my kids’ cups were always just rolling around loose. There are worse wagons than the Keenz 7S, but there are also better.

Pros

  • Easily accommodates four kids

  • Adjustable leatherette handles

  • Lots of storage

Cons

  • No cup holders for kids

  • Kids can't easily climb in and out

Product image of Evenflo Pivot Xplore
Evenflo Pivot Xplore
  • Stroller weight: 34.7 pounds
  • Max child weight: 55 pounds
  • Max basket weight: 300 pounds
  • Folding style: Folds in half for easy storage
  • Canopy style: Two telescoping UPF 50+ canopies, which can be flipped in case your kids want to sit back to back in the middle
  • Brake: On-wheel brakes
  • Restraints: A 3-point safety harness in each seat
  • Perks: Shiftable canopies. Drop-down sides for easier loading. Mesh footwell.

The Pivot Xplore All-Terrain was the cheapest wagon we tested, and in some ways that was pretty clear. The canopy materials didn’t feel quite as luxe or durable, and the overall size of the wagon felt smaller than comparable duo models. The snack and tray table felt perfunctory, and there wasn’t as much storage as some of the other models we tested.

That being said, I can see the Pivot Xplore being good for families with smaller toddlers who really just want to have a rough-and-tumble wagon to kick around with. Features like the drop-down sides for easy entrance are nice, and I like the idea that the handle flips and telescopes depending on whether you want to push or pull, even though I didn’t actually use that option very much.

This could be a decent choice if you’re looking for a second wagon, or maybe something less for street use and more for beaches and open fields. If you’re looking for something a lot better for just a bit more money, though, there are better options.

Pros

  • Easy to clean

  • Built-in cup holders

  • Cool color options

Cons

  • Materials feel cheap

Product image of Wonderfold W4 Luxe
Wonderfold W4 Luxe
  • Stroller weight: 63 pounds with seats, 59 pounds without
  • Max child weight: 99 pounds per bench
  • Max basket weight: 300 pounds
  • Folding style: Folds in half for easy storage
  • Canopy style: High-sitting, removable cloth canopy, which can be slid from right to left, depending on the angle of the sun.
  • Brake: One-touch pedal brake
  • Restraints: A 5-point magnetic safety harness in each seat
  • Perks: Front zippered door for easy access. Reclining seats. Storage basket. Adjustable canopy poles.

The Wonderfold W4 Luxe Quad is the most expensive wagon we tested by far, but it didn’t feel worth the investment. It’s a nice looking wagon and the leatherette handles add a touch of class. It’s certainly sizable and imposing, too, and can easily handle up to four kids at once. But there are wagons that do the same thing for less money and with more flair, so I’d rather just snag one of those instead.

One thing I really didn’t like about the Wonderfold W4 was how it handled on uneven terrain. When I took the kids for a walk around the block one day, I encountered a slightly slanted embankment and thought I’d take a run at it to see how the W4 did. Not great, as it turns out, because the wagon is so high up off the ground and so top-heavy that it almost flipped over, kids and all.

Also, the Wonderfold W4 is heavy. When you have the bench seats installed, it comes in at 63 pounds, and it’s so big that it feels almost impossible to lift it up. Where are you supposed to grab it? It’s just a little confusing, and, again, I don’t feel the need to try and figure all of that out when I know there are better, cheaper wagons out in the market.

Pros

  • Sleek, stylish design

  • Zippered door for kids to climb in

Cons

  • Top heavy enough to tip

  • Extremely heavy

Product image of Larktale Caravan
Larktale Caravan
  • Stroller weight: 33 pounds
  • Max child weight: 50 pounds
  • Max basket weight: 300 pounds
  • Folding style: Collapses accordion-style
  • Canopy style: Telescoping canopies on either end
  • Brake: One-touch foot pedal, plus a wheel brake on the other end
  • Restraints: A 5-point safety harness in each seat
  • Warranty: Two years
  • Perks: Canopies include both rain and bug covers built in. Reclining seats. Zippered bottom for easier cleaning.

Larktale is a relatively new name in the stroller wagon game, and while I admire their scrappy attitude and small business mentality, I had a few problems with this wagon. First of all, it sits too high off the ground, making it feel kind of like a minivan you’re pushing around. Second, the canopy set is not included and must be purchased separately.

The canopies themselves aren’t great. While I love the idea that they have rain and bug covers, it makes them feel a touch bulky, and the second I pulled either cover out, I knew that I’d never get it back in the zippered pouch again.

The Larktale canopies sit weirdly high, even when they’re collapsed, meaning I had a hard time seeing my kids inside the wagon even though they were just a couple of feet in front of me. This might not be an issue if you’re a tall drink of water, but for 5-foot, 5-inch me, it wasn’t great.

Pros

  • Cool color combinations

  • Multiple brake options

  • Zippered bottom for easy cleaning

Cons

  • Canopies and wagon are too tall

  • Canopies must be purchased separately

How We Tested Stroller Wagons

A line of stroller wagons with a young child sitting in one and smiling at the camera.
Credit: Reviewed / Lisa Lawrence

We tested lots of stroller wagons to find the best one for toting kids and gear.

I used each wagon exclusively for a few days, toting my 4-year-old twins wherever we needed to go, from the beach to the farmer’s market. We’d go on daily walks around the block, making sure to try and run into potential hazards (curbs without cutouts, loose gravel, etc.). My husband also tested each wagon, and built each one, offering feedback on what worked and what didn’t.

The Tester

My name is Marah Eakin, and I’m a longtime freelancer writer now living in Southern California with my husband and two kids. I’ve written up a number of other products for Reviewed, including the Toniebox and the Sago Mini box. When I’m not writing about boxes or wagons, I like watching The Great British Bake-Off and all the various RuPaul’s Drag Race franchises.

The Tests

A man pushes a child in the Jeep stroller wagon.
Credit: Reviewed / Lisa Lawrence

We put each stroller wagon to the test on outings with busy toddlers.

Stroller wagons are a big ticket item, so I wanted to be sure we put a ton of due diligence into helping parents make the right purchase. I looked into every stroller wagon on the market, comparing and contrasting what might be good to check out. What had the best user reviews? What seemed new or interesting? What models seemed thoughtfully made?

Once I had that pared down to about eight potential candidates, I ordered samples, which promptly took over my whole garage. I then assessed each stroller wagon based on 24 categories, weighing durability, style, ease of use, maneuverability, and comfort.

To make sure each stroller wagon was tested fairly, I put them through roughly the same tests, taking them around the block and through the beats of our everyday lives. We used them mostly outdoors, but a few did go inside when I felt like there would be enough space to move around, like at the L.A. Convention Center. All in all, testing took me about three months of hard pushing and pulling, all in service of trying to figure out the best stroller wagon on the market today.

What to Consider When Choosing a Stroller Wagon

If It Has a Car Seat Adaptor

If you have a growing family or are looking to tote kids of two different ages, make sure the wagon you’re picking has a car seat adaptor. Most have to be purchased separately, so make sure the wagon you’re interested in works with whatever car seat you have or plan to get.

How Much It Weighs

It’s important to consider how much your desired wagon weighs, because 40 pounds never seems like much until you’re lifting it repeatedly—or feeling what it’s like dispersed over a shape that’s hard to lift.

When possible, it’s nice to check out the wagon you like in person just to see how it handles and what it’s like to collapse and load it into a car. Some wagons just seem bigger and heavier, while others might technically weigh more but because of how they’re laid out actually lift much easier.

The Size of the Canopy

If you plan on using your wagon outdoors a lot, consider the size of your desired wagon’s canopy. Does it have one canopy or two? Does the canopy cover the whole wagon basket, or just the top? While it’s always good practice to put sunscreen on your kids before going outside, many wagons also offer UPF protective canopies as well, which is a nice addition.

How Big It Is

If you travel often and plan to take your stroller wagon with you, you’ll need to choose one that can be gate checked. Each airline has different rules for what they will handle, and you’ll have to check your wagon as a piece of luggage on most if not all airlines, so consider picking up a travel bag for your wagon as well.

It's also worth noting that Disneyland and Disney World do not allow stroller wagons, so if your primary destination is a Disney park, you'll need a backup stroller.

The Weight Limit

Each wagon has a stated weight limit, and they can vary depending on the materials used in each wagon’s construction. Make sure to check the listed limit for the wagon you’re interested in and think about how much wiggle room it gives you as your kids get bigger.

How Many Children You Have

There are wagons that hold two kids and wagons that hold four. All wagons will hold one kid comfortably, but if you’re looking to hold two older kids—say two 4-year-olds—you might want to consider getting a wagon that could hold more kids, just so there’s less arguing over who’s touching who, who’s kicking, and so on. Also, it’s always nice to have a little room just in case a friend wants to come along to the zoo.

Meet the tester

Marah Eakin

Marah Eakin

Contributor

Marah Eakin lives in Pasadena, California with her husband and twin toddlers. She has been a journalist almost all her literate life, and her work can be found on The A.V. Club. In her spare time, she pretty much just hangs out with her kids, who are exhausting.

See all of Marah Eakin's reviews

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