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The 2020 Vizio OLED, one of the best OLED TVs you can buy right now Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

The Best OLED TVs of 2022

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The 2020 Vizio OLED, one of the best OLED TVs you can buy right now Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

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Editor's Choice Product image of LG OLED65C1PUB
Best Overall

LG OLED65C1PUB

With its top-shelf performance and incredible array of future-facing features, the LG C1 is one of the best TVs of the year and one of the best TVs we've ever tested, period. Read More

Pros

  • Incredible contrast and color
  • Impressive array of features
  • Elegant design

Cons

  • Not a good fit for particularly bright rooms
Editor's Choice Product image of Vizio OLED55-H1
Best Value

Vizio OLED55-H1

The Vizio OLED is a fantastic TV that succeeds in delivering the performance chops we've come to expect from OLEDs, but it might not get bright enough for some folks. Read More

Pros

  • Sensational contrast and color
  • HDMI 2.1 support
  • Great value

Cons

  • Doesn't get as bright as the competition
  • Smart platform lacks flexibility
Editor's Choice Product image of Sony XR-65A90J

Sony XR-65A90J

The Sony A90J OLED is one of the brightest, most accurate OLED TVs we've ever tested. If you can swallow the cost, it'll serve you well for years to come. Read More

Pros

  • Incredible contrast and color
  • HDMI 2.1-specified features
  • Zippy, flexible smart platform

Cons

  • Brighter than last year, but still dim compared to LCD/LED TVs
Editor's Choice Product image of LG OLED65G1PUA

LG OLED65G1PUA

This 77-inch screen offers incredible contrast, spectacular color, and a full suite of future-proof features. But the price point is considerable. Read More

Pros

  • Top-tier picture quality
  • Speedy processing
  • Beautiful design

Cons

  • Overkill for many shoppers
Product image of LG OLED48A1PUA

LG OLED48A1PUA

The LG A1 is one of the most affordable ways to secure a great OLED TV with stunning contrast, but there are some tradeoffs: It doesn't get as bright as other OLED TVs, its native refresh rate is only 60Hz, and it's not as equipped for next-gen gaming as some of its competitors. Read More

Pros

  • Perfect black levels
  • Reliable, easy-to-use smart platform
  • Attractive design

Cons

  • Relatively dim 60Hz panel
  • No HDMI 2.1 or VRR
  • Color has slight blue-shift

There's no denying that OLED TVs are some of the best-looking TVs around. OLED (Organic Light-Emitting Diode) is a panel technology that makes for stunning contrast, incredible color, and ultra-slim profiles—it's the reason OLED TVs have topped our Best-of-Year lists for several years.

If you're looking for the best of the best in the world of OLED, we recommend the LG C1 (available at Amazon for $1,796.99). Not only does the C1 top our list of the best OLED TVs, it's also our current pick for the best TV you can buy, thanks to its unbelievable picture quality, razor-thin design, and future-facing features. Since almost every OLED TV looks amazing, what really ends up guiding the buying decision can be features and price.

If you're hoping to grab an OLED that's more budget-friendly, the Vizio OLED (available at Amazon) is our best value pick. All of the OLEDs here are glorious in their own right, however, and have been vetted with our strenuous cycle of lab tests.

These are the best OLED TVs we tested, ranked in order:

  1. LG C1
  2. Sony A90J
  3. LG G1
  4. Vizio OLED
  5. LG A1

The LG C1 OLED TV displaying 4K/HDR content
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

The LG C1 series combines the unbelievable performance of an OLED with an array of exciting features.

Best Overall
LG C1

The LG C1 (available in 48-, 55-, 65-, and 77-inch models) is a stunning OLED TV with an array of future-facing features that will help maintain its value for several years to come. It’s easy to see why it’s our pick for the best TV you can buy right now.

OLED TVs are known for their incredible contrast, and the LG C1 is no exception. It pairs a perfect black level with stellar highlights, offering a sustained peak brightness of around 700 to 800 nits in HDR, making it one of the brightest OLED TVs we’ve ever seen. When it comes to color, the C1 is a top-level performer, too; it features 100% SDR color saturation (Rec.709) and 97% HDR color saturation (DCI-P3). That means no matter what you’re watching, you can expect rich, true-to-life color. From cable TV to Blu-rays, the C1 makes TVs and movies look their best.

The LG C1 is equipped with four HDMI 2.1 inputs that all support 4K resolution at 120fps, which makes it a great choice for gamers who own (or plan on owning) an Xbox Series X or PlayStation 5. In fact, the LG C1 is stuffed with gaming-centric features, like Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM), Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and FreeSync/G-Sync support, and a suite of picture enhancements that can be found in the TV’s Game Optimizer menu.

The C1 also comes with the sixth iteration of LG’s webOS smart platform pre-installed, and while it’s not our favorite smart software going right now, most folks will find it suitable to their needs; it’s zippy, easy to navigate, and offers a broad selection of apps via LG’s Content Store.

Although the LG G1 and the Sony A90J are better-performing TVs by the thinnest of margins, we believe that, for most folks, the slight difference in picture quality isn’t worth the added cost.

Between its incredible performance, its wide array of features, and its elegant design, the LG C1 is the best TV you can buy right now. True A/V enthusiasts might be tempted by the LG G1 and the Sony A90J’s slightly superior picture quality, but if you want the best ride for your money, the C1 offers a nearly identical experience for a considerably friendlier price.

Pros

  • Incredible contrast and color

  • Impressive array of features

  • Elegant design

Cons

  • Not a good fit for particularly bright rooms

Vizio OLED (2020)
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

The 2020 Vizio OLED offers a taste of OLED picture quality for a price most people can justify.

Best Value
Vizio OLED

Vizio’s first OLED TV successfully blends the high-end picture quality we’ve come to expect from OLED TVs with the value-forward philosophies that helped give way to Vizio’s recent rise in popularity. It’s one of the most affordable ways to secure an OLED TV.

Available in 55- and 65-inch models, the Vizio OLED is packed with features fit for next-generation gaming, including HDMI 2.1 support (with eARC passthrough), VRR, and ALLM. Like all of the OLED TVs we’ve tested in recent years, the Vizio OLED also features a native refresh rate of 120Hz. This refresh rate, combined with the TV’s HDMI 2.1 support, means that the Vizio OLED will be capable of 4K gaming at 120 FPS.

And then, of course, there’s the Vizio OLED’s picture, which is unsurprisingly stunning. Due to the self-emissive nature of each pixel in an organic LED display, the Vizio OLED is capable of perfect black levels and rich, accurate colors. Although it doesn’t get nearly as bright as high-end quantum dot TVs, it’s about as bright as its direct competitor, the LG BX.

If you’re hoping to make your next TV an OLED, the Vizio OLED is the most affordable way to do so while still getting the latest, state-of-the-art TV tech. Simply put, when you factor in its performance chops and its next-gen gaming features, the Vizio OLED is one of the most value-packed TVs on the market.

Pros

  • Sensational contrast and color

  • HDMI 2.1 support

  • Great value

Cons

  • Doesn't get as bright as the competition

  • Smart platform lacks flexibility

Other Top-Rated OLED TVs We Tested

Product image of Sony XR-65A90J
Sony A90J

If quality is what you’re after and you don’t mind splashing out on a high-end TV, the Sony A90J is not only one of the best OLED TVs we’ve ever tested, but one of the best TVs we’ve ever tested, period.

The A90J blends the picture-perfect black levels of an OLED with some of the brightest highlights we’ve ever seen for this impressive display technology. In HDR, the A90J regularly climbs as high as 700 to 800 nits, with specular highlights getting much brighter than that in short bursts. The added brightness also elevates the TV’s colors, which are equal parts voluminous and accurate. In fact, the A90J’s HDR color palette covers about 98% of the expanded DCI-P3 color space when the TV is in its “Custom” picture mode.

The Sony A90J is also packed to the gills with features and enhancements, including the Google TV smart platform, eARC compatibility, Dolby Atmos and Dolby Vision support, a native refresh rate of 120Hz, and Center Speaker mode, which allows users to use the A90J’s internal speakers as the center channel of a surround sound setup.

Crucially, two of the A90J’s HDMI 2.1-specified ports offer Variable Refresh Rate, Auto Low Latency Mode, and support 4K content at 120 FPS. If you own (or plan on owning) a PlayStation 5 or Xbox Series X, these features are essential if you’re hoping to get the most out of the newest generation of gaming consoles.

If there’s one major criticism you can level at this remarkable TV, it’s that its cost is much higher than most TVs. Even among other high-end TVs in its own category, the Sony A90J sticks out as one of the priciest. Still, if you have the means and you’re searching for a TV with incredible out-of-the-box performance, the A90J is one of the best you’ll find on shelves today.

Pros

  • Incredible contrast and color

  • HDMI 2.1-specified features

  • Zippy, flexible smart platform

Cons

  • Brighter than last year, but still dim compared to LCD/LED TVs

Product image of LG OLED65G1PUA
LG G1

The LG G1 (available in 55, 65, and 77 inches) is the crown jewel of LG’s consumer-facing OLED TV lineup for 2021, offering slightly better performance than the LG C1, though at a significantly higher price point. It’s not an ideal fit for most people—even many folks shopping in a higher price bracket—but it’s an incredible TV stuffed with an incredible amount of features.

Being an OLED TV, the LG G1 sports perfect black levels and an incredible level of picture detail. It’s one of the few LG OLED TVs that uses the company’s “OLED “evo” panel technology, which allows the G1 to get slightly brighter than the LG C1. The OLED evo panel is also marginally better at saturating HDR color than the C1. That said, only the keenest of eyes will recognize the difference in picture quality between the G1 and the C1.

In terms of features, the G1 offers everything but the kitchen sink. With a 120Hz refresh rate, HDMI 2.1, G-Sync/FreeSync, Auto Low Latency Mode, and various game optimization settings, the G1 is one of the best TVs available for gamers. It also comes with the sixth iteration of LG’s webOS smart platform, which we find fast and flexible enough for most users.

The “G” in G1 stands for “Gallery,” and LG’s Gallery OLED series carries that name because it’s designed to hang on a wall like a piece of art. If you don’t want to wall-mount your next TV, you’ll need to shell out extra for the G1’s stand, which is sold separately.

There’s no denying that the LG G1 is one of the best TVs we’ve ever seen, and one that performs marginally better than the LG C1. The added cost, however, is anything but marginal—especially once you factor in the G1’s separately sold stand. For this reason, the G1 isn’t at the top of our ranking. If you decide to go all-in on the G1, however, you’ll be investing in one of the best TVs money can buy—and it’ll stay that way for years to come.

Editor's note: As of May, 2021, the most reliable place to find the LG G1 in stock is via LG's online store. According to LG, new inventory is being added regularly.

Pros

  • Top-tier picture quality

  • Speedy processing

  • Beautiful design

Cons

  • Overkill for many shoppers

Product image of LG OLED48A1PUA
LG A1

The LG A1 (available in 48-, 55-, 65-, and 75-inch models) is LG’s most affordable OLED TV of the year, and it’s aimed squarely at the crowd that wants to invest in this impressive display technology without spending too much for that privilege. While pretty much every OLED TV is a marvel to look at, there are a few sticking points about the A1 that are worth considering.

Thanks to its self-lit pixels, the A1 features the unmistakable visual trademark of every OLED display: perfect, inky black levels. Its color production is also terrific; the A1 covers 100% of the SDR color gamut (Rec.709) and 96% of the extra-wide HDR color gamut (DCI-P3). Everything you watch on this TV will look crisp, detailed, and brimming with life.

Unfortunately, the A1 struggles to get much brighter than 400 to 500 nits, making HDR content feel a bit lacking when compared to some of the other options in its price range. OLED TVs are well known to be much dimmer than traditional LED TVs, but the A1 is dimmer than just about every OLED we’ve seen in the last few years, including the Vizio OLED. The LG OLED that’s a step up from the A1, the LG C1, is capable of climbing as high as 750 nits in HDR, for example

Unlike the LG C1, the A1 is also lacking in the features department. It doesn’t support HDMI 2.1 and is limited to a 60Hz refresh rate, so 4K gaming at 120fps is out of the question. And while it supports Auto Low Latency Mode, the A1 doesn’t come with Variable Refresh Rate, one of the most valued and sought-after features among gaming enthusiasts. Of course, if you aren’t a gamer, you might prefer the A1 since you won’t be paying for features you won’t use.

The LG A1 is impressive in a handful of ways that only OLED TVs can achieve: Its panel is thinner than most smartphones, its black levels are perfect, and its viewing angles are among the most accommodating on the market today. But the LG C1 isn’t that much more expensive than the A1, and we suspect that for most folks shopping in this class, it will prove to be the more attractive option given its high-level performance and laundry list of features.

Pros

  • Perfect black levels

  • Reliable, easy-to-use smart platform

  • Attractive design

Cons

  • Relatively dim 60Hz panel

  • No HDMI 2.1 or VRR

  • Color has slight blue-shift

How We Tested OLED TVs

It'd be an understatement to say that we're serious about TV testing. The lab in our Cambridge location is outfitted with much of the same equipment you'd find at a factory that manufactures and calibrates television.

On the hardware side, we've got things like a Konica Minolta CS-200 tristimulus color meter, an LS-100 luminance meter, a Leo Bodnar input lag tester, a Murideo Seven 8K signal generator, and more Blu-rays than we can keep track of. For software, we use Portrait Displays’ Calman Ultimate color calibration software, the industry-standard in taking display measurements and calibrating screens to specifications.

Credit: Reviewed

Our lab is outfitted with much of the same equipment you would find at a factory that manufactures and calibrates televisions.

Our testing process is equally complicated and has been honed over many years to gather data that is marginal enough to satisfy curious video engineers, but also relevant to the average person's viewing experience. We measure things like peak brightness, black level, hue and saturation for primary and secondary digital colors, the accuracy of the TV's electro-optical transfer function—you get the idea, it's complicated.

Weighting for our performance tests is based on how the human eye prioritizes vision, which means we put "brightness" data (monochromatic eye based on light sensitivity) higher than colorimetry, which is also scaled by the eye's sensitivity, and so on.
Outside of the strictly technical tests, we also spend a lot of time just watching and using each TV, getting a feel for the at-home experience of doing things like dialing up streaming video service, connecting a Blu-ray player and watching movies, using the smart features, and checking out the TV's ports, remote, and on-set buttons—anything and everything that might be relevant.

What Should You Consider Before Buying an OLED TV?

When it comes to knowing what you're paying for, almost no category is harder to sift through than TVs. While knowing the specs of the TV you're shopping for is only half the battle, it's the bigger half. Here are the key bits of jargon you'll want to know while browsing:

  • 4K/UHD: Usually 4K refers to resolution—specifically, 3,840 x 2,160 pixels. This is the current standard/mainstream resolution for most TVs. UHD means Ultra High Definition, and actually refers to a suite of picture improvements like 4K resolution and Wide Color Gamut, which can display many more shades than HD TVs.
  • High Dynamic Range: Like "UHD," High Dynamic Range (or HDR) refers to both a type of TV and a type of content that expands on the typical range of brightness (luminance) and color that a TV will produce. HDR TVs are newer and usually a bit more expensive, but can have many times the brightness and 30% more color production than non-HDR TVs. Current top HDR formats include HDR10, HDR10+, and Dolby Vision.
  • 60Hz/120Hz: These numbers refer to what is called a "refresh rate," with Hz (hertz) representing "times per second." So if a TV's refresh rate is 60Hz, this means it re-scans and updates for picture information 60 times per second; with 120Hz, it's 120 times per second. Currently, TVs only come in 60 or 120Hz. A higher refresh rate is always better, but not always necessary.
  • Smart TV: The term "smart TV" has evolved a lot over the years, but all it really means is that the TV connects to the internet. Most smart TVs these days are just a way to watch streaming services like Hulu, Netflix, Disney+, and Amazon Prime Video on your TV. Some smart TVs have browsers, calendars, or even Roku or Android functions. All smart TVs have ethernet or WiFi built-in.

Are There Any Downsides to Owning an OLED TV?

While OLED TVs have many upsides, their major concern comes in the form of "burn-in" or "image retention," which are essentially two sides of the same coin. Image retention refers to any image that "sticks" on a screen, even when the picture changes. It usually appears as a faint ghost, and with most TVs this fades after a moment or two. Burn-in, on the other hand, is a form of image retention that lasts much longer, and it's usually visible even when playing other content. Both terms have haunted conversations about OLED TVs since the display technology was first introduced, but the truth is, there's not much to worry about.

Burn-in is typically caused by leaving a static image on a screen for a long period of time. When it comes to most contemporary TVs, image retention and burn-in are only risks during extreme circumstances. For instance, our lab tests indicated that long-term OLED burn-in was only a risk if a static image was left on the screen for well over 20 hours, and most minor image retention issues seemed to go away with time.

Meet the testers

Michael Desjardin

Michael Desjardin

Senior Staff Writer

@Reviewed

Michael Desjardin graduated from Emerson College after having studied media production and screenwriting. He specializes in tech for Reviewed, but also loves film criticism, weird ambient music, cooking, and food in general.

See all of Michael Desjardin's reviews
Lee Neikirk

Lee Neikirk

Editor, Home Theater

@Koanshark

Lee has been Reviewed's point person for most television and home theater products since 2012. Lee received Level II certification in TV calibration from the Imaging Science Foundation in 2013. As Editor of the Home Theater vertical, Lee oversees reviews of TVs, monitors, soundbars, and Bluetooth speakers. He also reviews headphones, and has a background in music performance.

See all of Lee Neikirk's reviews

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