Skip to main content
Photo of a Fujitsu document scanner on a tabletop. Credit: Fujitsu

The Best Scanners of 2022

Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

Photo of a Fujitsu document scanner on a tabletop. Credit: Fujitsu

Why trust Reviewed?

Reviewed's mission is to help you buy the best stuff and get the most out of what you already own. Our team of product experts thoroughly vet every product we recommend to help you cut through the clutter and find what you need.

Learn more about our product testing
Product image of Fujitsu ScanSnap iX1600

Fujitsu ScanSnap iX1600

This Fujitsu ScanSnap offers a handy 4.3-inch touchscreen, up to 30 customizable job settings, and supports up to four user licenses per device. Read More

Pros

  • Compatible with Mac and Windows
  • Handy touchscreen interface
  • USB and Wi-Fi connectivity

Cons

  • None that we could find
Product image of CZUR Aura-B Book and Document Scanner

CZUR Aura-B Book and Document Scanner

Perfect for digitizing some of your physical library, the Aura-B uses laser tech and AI to turn the curved pages of each book into a clean, flat scan. Read More

Pros

  • Lightning-fast scanning speeds
  • Curve-flattening technology
  • An array of reading lights

Cons

  • No wireless connectivity
Product image of Epson WorkForce ES-50

Epson WorkForce ES-50

Powered with a simple USB cable, this no-frills, lightweight Epson scanner is small and portable, making it ideal for a fast-paced office environment. Read More

Pros

  • A high degree of compatibility
  • Lightweight and portable
  • Excellent scan quality

Cons

  • Occasional auto-feeder issues
  • Less convenient with Wi-Fi
Product image of Doxie Go SE

Doxie Go SE

The Doxie Go SE offers slick, standalone scanning anywhere—without the need for a connected PC. It’s powered by a rechargeable battery. Read More

Pros

  • Produces full-color, 600 dpi scans
  • No connected device necessary
  • Rechargeable battery

Cons

  • Potential software and Wi-Fi issues
Product image of Brother DS-640 Compact Scanner

Brother DS-640 Compact Scanner

This compact scanner offers speed and portability; support for Mac, Windows, and Linux machines; and a straightforward USB 3.0 setup. Read More

Pros

  • Lightning-fast scanning speeds
  • A high degree of compatibility
  • Lightweight and portable

Cons

  • Reports of poor customer service

If you’ve got a stack of paper documents up to the ceiling—or business cards or IDs or receipts you want to digitize—it’s time to look into a good, reliable scanner.

While many all-in-one printers offer some sort of scanning functionality, you really can’t beat the speed and efficiency of a dedicated, portable scanner. A great scanner lets you work your way through a large collection of printed materials and organize them into a digital archive.

Some are better for digitizing books, some are more efficient than others, and some don’t work well for certain home-office setups. But we’ve researched a wide range of popular options on Amazon, and these highly rated models should suit most shoppers’ needs, depending on the nature of your typical scanning project.

Here are some of the best scanners you can get online.

Editor's Note

The recommendations in this guide are based on thorough product and market research by our team of expert product reviewers. The picks are based on examining user reviews, product specifications, and, in some limited cases, our experience with the specific products named.

Product image of Fujitsu ScanSnap iX1600
Fujitsu ScanSnap iX1600

This Fujitsu ScanSnap offers a handy 4.3-inch touchscreen, up to 30 customizable job settings, and supports up to four user licenses per device. You can connect to a Windows PC or Mac with either USB or Wi-Fi. It works with receipts, postcards, standard paper documents, photos, and business cards. Amazon advertises it as “Climate Pledge friendly,” so it’s a vote for sustainability and the environment compared to some of the competition.

Reviewers love how easy it is to use, and have also been impressed with its longevity; the ScanSnap is purportedly made to last.

Pros

  • Compatible with Mac and Windows

  • Handy touchscreen interface

  • USB and Wi-Fi connectivity

Cons

  • None that we could find

Product image of CZUR Aura-B Book and Document Scanner
CZUR Aura-B Book and Document Scanner

This scanner takes a little bit more hands-on work by design, but it offers ultra-quick scanning speeds (two seconds per page) and versatility. Perfect for digitizing some of your physical library, as well as your typical documents, the Aura-B uses laser tech and AI to turn the curved pages of every book into a clean, flat scan. You can set it to one of four different color-temp settings; output to JPEG, PDF, Word, and .tiff file types; and use an array of built-in lights for convenient reading at any hour of the day.

You’ll have to connect it using a USB cable, but it’s compatible with plenty of Windows and Mac operating systems. Reviewers warn that it’s not the most efficient scanner in the world; you might expect to archive about one average-length book per day. It comes with a one-year warranty.

Pros

  • Lightning-fast scanning speeds

  • Curve-flattening technology

  • An array of reading lights

Cons

  • No wireless connectivity

Product image of Epson WorkForce ES-50
Epson WorkForce ES-50

Connected and powered with a simple USB cable, this no-frills, lightweight Epson scanner is small and portable, making it ideal for a fast-paced office environment. It can scan 8.5-inch-wide printouts up to 72 inches long, along with receipts and smaller documents. Epson’s software lets you export to the cloud on Windows or Mac, creating searchable PDFs, Word docs, or Excel sheets. It can also auto-feed multiple pages through continuously, creating a single convenient file.

User reviews have described it as “almost perfect,” though you may run into some limitations when using Wi-Fi or mobile devices, as opposed to plugging it into a laptop via USB.

Pros

  • A high degree of compatibility

  • Lightweight and portable

  • Excellent scan quality

Cons

  • Occasional auto-feeder issues

  • Less convenient with Wi-Fi

Product image of Doxie Go SE
Doxie Go SE

The Doxie Go SE offers slick, standalone scanning anywhere—without the need for a connected PC. It’s powered by a rechargeable battery that ought to last up to 400 scans, and you can store as many as 8,000 pages before needing to upload to another device. You can scan full-color documents at 600 dpi, so the quality’s a little bit higher than similar scanners, and its software can auto-correct things like crooked pages, negative space, or poor contrast.

It comes with a one-year warranty as well as an SD card for storing your doc files. As with many products of this sort, the main complaints among shoppers involve the Wi-Fi connectivity or the software. If you’re looking to scan a high volume of multi-page documents, reviewers seem to think you should look elsewhere. For everyday scanning tasks, it’s got everything you need.

Pros

  • Produces full-color, 600 dpi scans

  • No connected device necessary

  • Rechargeable battery

Cons

  • Potential software and Wi-Fi issues

Product image of Brother DS-640 Compact Scanner
Brother DS-640 Compact Scanner

This compact scanner offers speed and portability; support for Mac, Windows, and Linux machines; and a straightforward USB 3.0 setup. There are upgrade models that offer wireless connectivity, but this little scanner can get the job done at a very attractive price point. It can handle full-color documents—including business cards and photo IDs—at up to 300 dpi, and features an optional auto-fix setting to clean up your scan job without any hassle.

You can save documents to your PC, a network, the cloud, an email address, or OCR software. Reviewers have said that the manufacturer’s customer service can be unhelpful, but Amazon should remedy any early issues.

Pros

  • Lightning-fast scanning speeds

  • A high degree of compatibility

  • Lightweight and portable

Cons

  • Reports of poor customer service

Meet the tester

Alex Kane

Alex Kane

Sr. Editor, Search & Updates

@alexjkane

Alex Kane is a senior editor at USA Today’s Reviewed and the author of the Boss Fight Books volume on Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic. He has written for Fangoria, PC Gamer, Polygon, Rolling Stone, StarWars.com, and Variety. He lives in west-central Illinois.

See all of Alex Kane's reviews

Checking our work.

Our team is here for one purpose: to help you buy the best stuff and love what you own. Our writers, editors, and lab technicians obsess over the products we cover to make sure you're confident and satisfied. Have a different opinion about something we recommend? Email us and we'll compare notes.

Shoot us an email