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The Best Jigsaw Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

The Best Jigsaws of 2022

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The Best Jigsaw Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

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Editor's Choice Product image of DeWalt DCS334B
Best Overall

DeWalt DCS334B

DeWalt’s quality and thoughtful design resulted in the DCS334B: a safe and responsive jigsaw, albeit at a premium price. Read More

Pros

  • Extra safety features
  • Outstanding build quality
  • Tool-free shoe adjustment
  • Powerful motor

Cons

  • Lack of a cutting guide leaves you guessing
  • Expensive
2
Editor's Choice Product image of Hart HPJS01
Best Value

Hart HPJS01

The Hart HPJS01 offers a lot of power and versatility at a reasonable price. Read More

Pros

  • Lots of power
  • Good view of cutting area
  • Effective controls

Cons

  • No battery power indicator
  • Unable to plunge cut
  • Trigger lock keeps tool running rather than acting as a safety feature
3
Product image of Ryobi P5231

Ryobi P5231

The Ryobi P5231 offers more power than similar jigsaws but the price of its battery and charger make it less appealing than it could be. Read More

Pros

  • Accurate cutting guide
  • Able to plunge cut
  • Speed dial controls

Cons

  • No trigger lock
  • Expensive battery system
4
Product image of Bosch JSH180B

Bosch JSH180B

When compared to saws that cost half as much, the Bosch JSH180B doesn't make the cut. Read More

Pros

  • Extra blades in box
  • Able to complete plunge cut
  • Clean cutting lines
  • Safety lock on trigger

Cons

  • Jigsaws with similar performance sell for less
5
Product image of Craftsman CMES612

Craftsman CMES612

The corded Craftsman CMES612 offers more power and a more comfortable handle than its cordless counterpart. Read More

Pros

  • Completed plunge cut, Comfortable handle

Cons

  • Speed setting dial is located on the trigger

During a DIY project, if you need to make a curved cut, create a hole in the middle of a piece of material, or cut into something in a tight spot, you're going to want a jigsaw. Similar to a reciprocating saw, jigsaws are a versatile tool capable of making clean, precise straight or curved cuts, plunge cutting to create a hole in the middle of a piece of wood or styrofoam insulation or sawing in small spaces that other saws simply can't reach.

Editor's Note

The recommendations in this guide are based on thorough product and market research by our team of expert product reviewers. The picks are based on examining user reviews, product specifications, and, in some limited cases, our experience with the specific products named.

The Best Jigsaws
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

The DeWalt DCS334B is currently the best jigsaw you can buy.

Best Overall
DeWalt DCS334B

While other jigsaws in this guide are primarily built using plastic components, the DeWalt DCS334B is primarily built using metal and metal alloys. Even with its superior build quality, it was only 0.1 pounds heavier than the majority of its competitors.

Where most of the saws in this guide require an Allan wrench to change the position of their shoe (the part of the saw that rests on the material you’re cutting), the DCS334B's shoe, with its clearly labeled markings for 0, 15, 30, and 45 degrees, tilts using a lever located on the back of the tool. Its blade retention system was the safest of any of the saws that I tested. Rather than having to tug and twist at a sharp, hot (if you just finished making a cut) blade to remove it, the DCS334B uses a clamp that safely ejects its blade.

As for performance, the DCS334B cuts exceptionally clean, sawing effortlessly through the materials it's pitted against. While performing plunge cuts (cutting into the middle of a piece of material, instead of its edge), the Dewalt DCS334B bested the other saws in this guide.

However, I wasn’t impressed with the DCS334B’s cutting guide. The other jigsaws I found employ a wire cutting guide that helps predict where the saw's cut line will appear. Instead of a wire, the DCS334B’s uses a series of notches in its shoe to indicate its blade's location, which feels less intuitive. That said, with a little practice any user will quickly become comfortable with this jigsaw’s cut line system.

The DeWalt DCS334B comes without battery. If you haven’t already invested in the company’s battery system, you can buy its battery and charger from Amazon.

Pros

  • Extra safety features

  • Outstanding build quality

  • Tool-free shoe adjustment

  • Powerful motor

Cons

  • Lack of a cutting guide leaves you guessing

  • Expensive

The Best Jigsaws
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

The Hart HPJS01 surprised us with how capable it was, considering its modest price.

Best Value
Hart HPJS01

The Hart HPJS01’s speed and orbital blade controls set it apart from everything else in its price range. Being able to adjust the jigsaw’s power and blade settings to match the material being cut makes a significant difference in the smoothness of cuts.

The HPJS01 requires an Allan wrench (included and stored on the tool) to adjust its shoe to make angled cuts. The shoe has notches to mark three different cutting angles. No matter which angle you're cutting at, the results, when working with plywood, were very clean.

The HPJS01 has some downsides, however.

I find that its wire blade guide isn't quite as accurate as I would have liked. However, after a bit of practice, you should be able to overcome this shortcoming, as the blade area is quite visible while the tool is in use. There is no charge level indicator on Hart’s batteries, which is disappointing. There are few things more frustrating than setting off to start a new project, only to discover that your tools have no juice.

Additionally, I wasn’t able to complete a plunge cut with this tool. If this is a cut you make often, consider the Ryobi P5231 instead: it offers similar performance at a reasonable price.

The Hart HPJS01 comes without a battery. If you haven’t already invested in the company’s battery system, you can buy a battery and charger from Walmart.

Pros

  • Lots of power

  • Good view of cutting area

  • Effective controls

Cons

  • No battery power indicator

  • Unable to plunge cut

  • Trigger lock keeps tool running rather than acting as a safety feature

Product image of Ryobi P5231
Ryobi P5231

While it might not look like much, the Ryobi P5231’s cutting guide is the best one that we found. Its design makes it easy to follow the markers lines drawn on plywood, resulting in a clean, accurate cut. In addition, the Ryobi feels like a more powerful tool than many others similarly priced and the vibration felt during cutting is low. The battery system has indicators to show its charge, letting you know if you need to charge it before you begin your project.

Overall, the Ryobi scored similarly to my Best Value Pick, the Hart HPJS01. The price difference between the Hart and the Ryobi bare tool is minor. However, Royobi’s batteries and charger cost more than twice as much as the Hart.

The Ryobi P5231 comes without a battery. If you haven’t already invested in the company’s battery system, you can buy a battery and charger from Amazon.

Pros

  • Accurate cutting guide

  • Able to plunge cut

  • Speed dial controls

Cons

  • No trigger lock

  • Expensive battery system

Product image of Bosch JSH180B
Bosch JSH180B

The Bosch JSH180 performs most tasks fairly well, including plunge cuts.

With a safety lock on the trigger and a wire cutline guide similar to the Ryobi, the Bosch JSH180B has several high-end, useful features in a solid-feeling tool. However, most of these features can be found in tools that cost half as much as the Bosch. The cuts delivered are clean, generally, and JSH180B's shoe comes with a soft plastic overlay to help reduce scratches on delicate materials. The saw’s powerful motor makes it easy to zip through cuts.

The Bosch JSH180 comes without a battery. If you haven’t already invested in the company’s battery system, you can buy a battery and charger from Amazon.

Pros

  • Extra blades in box

  • Able to complete plunge cut

  • Clean cutting lines

  • Safety lock on trigger

Cons

  • Jigsaws with similar performance sell for less

Product image of Craftsman CMES612
Craftsman CMES612

If you need a budget jigsaw and a cord doesn’t cramp your style, the Craftsman CMES612 is a good choice. It’s essentially the same tool as Craftsman’s battery-powered CMCS600B, but with a power cord instead of a battery. The CMES612 is able to complete a plunge cut (unlike its cordless counterpart) and had a more ergonomic handle. Even if you’ve bought into the Craftsman battery system with other Craftsman tools, this corded jigsaw is worth your consideration.

Pros

  • Completed plunge cut, Comfortable handle

Cons

  • Speed setting dial is located on the trigger

Product image of Porter Cable PCC650B
Porter Cable PCC650B

The Porter Cable PCC650B is a bare-bones jigsaw. There’s no LED to light your cut, nor a wire cutting guide. It will get the job done, as long as that job doesn't require a plunge cut— the PCC650B isn't able to complete one. The PCC650B does have one feature that I like: its shoe comes with clearly labeled degree markings to change the angle of the cut, unlike similarly priced saws that leave you guessing as to the shoe’s position.

The Porter Cable PCC650B comes without a battery. If you haven’t already invested in the company’s battery system, you can buy a battery and charger from Amazon.

Pros

  • Clear markings for degrees

  • Comfortable handle

Cons

  • Not able to complete plunge cut

  • Limited feature set

Product image of Craftsman CMCS600B
Craftsman CMCS600B

I expected the battery-powered Craftsman CMES612 to have similar performance to the corded Craftsman CMES612. Unfortunately, this was not the case. During use, The Craftsman CMCS600B provides surprisingly clean cuts through plywood and drywall. However, in order to complete these cuts, you might have to exert more physical effort than with the other jigsaws in this guide—it lacks the power needed to make cutting with it anything less than a chore. As such, I wasn’t surprised to find that it was incapable of creating a plunge cut.

Unless you are already invested in Craftsman’s battery system, my best overall and value picks will serve you better.

The Craftsman CMES612 comes without a battery. If you haven’t already invested in the company’s battery system, you can buy a battery and charger from Amazon.

Pros

  • Uses metal loop instead of plastic for blade retention

  • Safety lock on trigger

  • Makes clean cuts

Cons

  • Underpowered

  • Couldn't complete plunge cut

  • Hard to predict cut line

Product image of Black and Decker BDCJS20B
Black and Decker BDCJS20B

Similar in shape and style to both of the Craftsman saws in this guide, the Black and Decker BDCJS20B fails to impress.
During use, the tool feels underpowered, forcing the user to push the saw a bit harder than usual in order to complete cuts. I do, however, like the fact that the only way to control the saw is by how hard its trigger is depressed: The harder you squeeze, the faster the blade speed.

The cuts made by the BDCJS20B are very clean, comparable to the results derived from using our main pick, the DeWalt DCS334B, when cutting drywall. That said, the Black and Decker isn't able to create a plunge cut.

This saw might be a good choice for individuals only interested in cutting into lighter materials. Otherwise, you might want to consider a different jigsaw for your next project.

Pros

  • Clean cut on drywall

  • Trigger controls blade speed

Cons

  • Underpowered

  • Plastic blade retention loop

What You Should Know About Jigsaws

The Best Jigsaws
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar

There's a lot more to using a jigsaw than simply pulling the trigger.

Parts of a Jigsaw

Generally, a jigsaw is made up of at least six visible parts:

Blade: is the replaceable, cutting metal piece that retracts and extends to cut.
Shoe: is the part of the saw that rests and slides on top of the material you are cutting. Generally, the shoe will be at a 90-degree angle to the saw unless you are cutting a beveled edge.
Blade release: the button or lever that releases the blade, allowing the blade to be exchanged.
Blade wheel: supports the non-cutting side of the blade, keeping the blade from moving from side-to-side.
Bevel Adjust: allows you to angle the shoe to cut at an angle.
Trigger: controls the motion of the blade, might also allow you to control the speed of the saw movement if the trigger is a variable speed trigger.

Some jigsaws might have extra features, like a LED light, a variable cutting speed dial, lock button (some work as a trigger lock, others allow for the saw to run without a finger on the trigger), orbital control (changes the size of the ellipse the blade travels through), or blade guide (to help you accurately predict your cut line).

What Is Orbital Action in a Jigsaw?

With most jigsaws, the default movement of the blade is up-and-down. However, some jigsaws offer an orbital setting. In these cases, the manufacturer is offering users the option to use an elliptical blade motion which pulls the blade away from the material being cut, on the downward stroke. This setting is often used when cutting more delicate materials, like thin laminates, or for making careful, controlled cuts.

Common Jigsaw Cuts

Jigsaw cuts are usually straightforward—line up with a cut line marked on your material, start the saw blade moving before touching your material with it and, as you cut, follow the marked line. Straight cuts are obviously easy, but if your cutting path includes a sharp corner, slow down before making the turn with your saw.

If you are cutting material away, however, things get a bit more interesting.

A plunge cut can be used if you want to cut a hole out of the middle of your material—cutting a hole in a countertop for a sink is a good example of this. For this cut, rest the saw on the front part of its shoe. Then, pulling the saw’s trigger, tilt the tool down into the material you want to cut.
You should know that some jigsaws aren’t able to make a plunge cut. A common method for getting around this is to use a drill to make a hole in the material you’re working with to give your jigsaw’s blade a place to dig into.

Types of Jigsaw Blades

Different types of material require different blades. One of the easiest ways to tell the differences between blade types is the number of teeth per inch (TPI). The higher the TPI, the cleaner the cut but, the slower the cutting goes.

For particularly fragile material (like laminate or thin wood veneer) blades that cut on the upstroke can help reduce splinters and rough cuts. Blades for cutting metal, plexiglass, and tile are labeled for those materials and frequently have high TPI counts. a visual explanation of TPI and blade types, check out this video from See Jane Drill.

Can a Jigsaw Cut Metal?

If you plan on cutting through hard materials, like metal or doing demolition work, a reciprocating saw might be a better fit.

Meet the tester

Rebecca Boniface

Rebecca Boniface

Contributor

Rebecca Boniface is a certified PADI dive instructor, full-time nomad, and DIY enthusiast.

See all of Rebecca Boniface's reviews

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