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The Best Pressure Washers of 2022

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Editor's Choice Product image of Kärcher K4 Power Control
Best Overall

Kärcher K4 Power Control

The Karcher K4 Power Control is a top-tier pressure washer that provides versatility and cleaning performance. Read More

Pros

  • Powerful
  • Easy to use
  • Versatile

Cons

  • Stiff hose
2
Editor's Choice Product image of Wholesun 3000PSI Pressure Washer
Best Value

Wholesun 3000PSI Pressure Washer

This value washer packs a punch with 3,000 pounds of pressure per square inch. That was considerably more than even some industrial-style washers. Read More

Pros

  • Surprisingly powerful
  • Lightweight
  • Windup hose storage
  • Bonus attachments

Cons

  • Poor build quality
  • No nozzle storage
  • Spray-wand holster lets tip drag
3
Product image of DeWalt DWPW2400

DeWalt DWPW2400

This beast of a pressure washer is marketed as a consumer device, but you’ll feel like a professional when you use it. Read More

Pros

  • Impressive built quality and heft
  • Includes plenty of nozzles
  • Easy-to-use soap function

Cons

  • Took a surprisingly long time to clear away paint
  • Expensive
4
Product image of Ryobi RY142300

Ryobi RY142300

It's effective at clearing away mud, sand, and even paint from all surfaces, but it doesn't always perform as well as it should for the price. Read More

Pros

  • Runs fairly quietly
  • Effective at clearing away debris
  • Solid heft and build quality

Cons

  • Engine constantly runs
  • Spray wand has a heavy kick back
  • Difficult-to-use soap function
5
Product image of Sun Joe SPX3000

Sun Joe SPX3000

This quickly cleared mud and sand, but paint was more difficult to get off, and its engine was also a bit on the loud side. Read More

Pros

  • Spray tips are easy to swap in and out
  • Dispenser dial helps limit soap usage
  • Effective at clearing away loose materials

Cons

  • Garden hose hook-up is hard to use
  • Surprisingly loud
  • Hose management system isn’t great

Pressure washers may not be a glamorous tool, but for anyone looking for some serious cleaning power, they’re essential. Pressure washers make light work of otherwise heavy-duty cleaning tasks, taking dirt and grime off vinyl siding, driveways, and more. Instead of having to sand, scrub, and scrape for hours, the best pressure washers do the hard work for you.

We tested a number of the top-rated pressure washers, ranging from lightweight, portable devices perfect for smaller cleaning jobs to heavy, sturdy beasts that would catch the eye of trained professionals.

The Karcher K4 Power Control (available at Bed, Bath & Beyond) was our best overall choice for its versatility which makes it ideal for homeowners and professionals alike. And if you’re looking to save some money, you can’t go wrong with the impressively powerful Wholesun 3000PSI (available at Amazon).

The Karcher K4 Power Control cleaning asphalt
Credit: Reviewed / Jonathan Chan

The Karcher K4 Power Control is a top-tier pressure washer

Best Overall
Karcher K4 Power Control

Weight: 27 pounds Pressure: 1,900 PSI Gallons per minute: 1.5 Power source: Electric Nozzles included: 2

The Karcher K4 Power Control checks all the right boxes for a great electric powered pressure washer. It’s very powerful without being cumbersome. During testing, it was able to peel paint off a sign and make quick work of a grimey brick wall.

What sets the K4 Power Control apart from other pressure washers on this list is how easy it is to use. It comes with only two wands, but possesses more versatility than its competitors. The first spray wand has adjustable pressure. By twisting it you can change the aperture from sudsing up your car all the way to stripping paint.

The second is a high-pressure spray wand that specializes in the toughest jobs. Both are easier to install than the small jet heads that many other pressure washers use. All you need to do is insert the wand into the handle and twist, when it clicks it’s secure.

Like the lances, the hose is also simple to install. The K4 comes with an adapter that screws onto the hose and then it’s a matter of clipping the hose in and out of the unit. Same philosophy for the detergent tank, you simply plug the detergent bottle in and out.

The one issue we experienced was that the hose was stiffer than the previous models.

Overall, we think the Karcher Power Control is the best pressure washer because it’s powerful but also approachable and it performed solidly throughout testing.

Pros

  • Powerful

  • Easy to use

  • Versatile

Cons

  • Stiff hose

A person sprays a brick wall with the green Wholesun pressure washer.
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

The Wholesun 3000PSI pressure washer is the best value option we've tested.

Best Value
Wholesun 3000PSI Pressure Washer

Weight: 19 pounds Pressure: 3,000 PSI Gallons per minute: 2.4 Power source: Electric Nozzles included: 5

The first thing you’ll probably notice about the Wholesun 3000PSI pressure washer is how light it is. Standing at a little over 2 ft. tall, this 19-pound machine is a compact little thing. But just wait until you turn it on.

This washer packs a punch with 3,000 pounds of water pressure per square inch, and a 2.4 GPM. That was considerably more than even some of the industrial-style washers we tested. The Wholesun cleaned mud and a clogged gutter with considerable ease. Using 15- and 0-degree nozzles, it slowly cleaned away paint from vinyl and aluminum siding, wood, brick, and pavement when others failed.

But what we really liked about this little green machine was everything that was included in the box. It has four spray nozzles (40-, 25- 15-, and the intensely abrasive 0-degree nozzle), a bottle nozzle for soap cleaning (which it does really well), and a brush head for detailing work.

The wind-up storage reel for the device’s 20-foot hose was a real show-stopper. Being able to wind the hose up, wrap the power cord onto the back, and have a slot for the spray attachments meant this little device can be neatly stored away without taking up too large of a footprint.

Strangely enough, though, those nozzle heads don’t have any onboard storage, so make sure you don’t lose the plastic bag they came in. We also thought the device itself felt a bit flimsy and cheaply made, but for the price, you can’t beat the sheer cleaning power of the Wholesun 3000PSI. All the bonus attachments are just icing on the cake.

Pros

  • Surprisingly powerful

  • Lightweight

  • Windup hose storage

  • Bonus attachments

Cons

  • Poor build quality

  • No nozzle storage

  • Spray-wand holster lets tip drag

Other Pressure Washers We Tested

Product image of DeWalt DWPW2400
DeWalt DWPW2400

Weight: 45.2 pounds Pressure: 2,400 PSI Gallons per minute: 1.1 Power source: Electric Nozzles included: 5

This beast of a pressure washer is marketed as a consumer device, but you’ll feel like a professional when you use it. Wheeling it around on its 10-inch pneumatic wheels is a breeze, which is a good thing because it weighs over 45 pounds.

Belying its heft, the Dewalt DWPW2400 runs surprisingly quietly. When blasting away debris, the engine never got that loud, and the jet of water didn’t clang off the testing surfaces that much. Releasing the trigger on the spray away quickly and effectively shuts off the engine entirely.

It’s effective at clearing away mud and sand, but surprisingly slow at clearing away paint from all surfaces. Unlike other pressure washers, no 0-degree spray tip was included, so we conducted most of the tests with the 15-degree nozzle and the turbo nozzle, which wasn’t as effective as we would have liked. It also includes 40- and 25-degree nozzles.

We did enjoy using the soap function, though. The soap tank is extremely easy to load and the suds the machine shot out were plentiful.

Pros

  • Impressive built quality and heft

  • Includes plenty of nozzles

  • Easy-to-use soap function

Cons

  • Took a surprisingly long time to clear away paint

  • Expensive

Product image of Ryobi RY142300
Ryobi RY142300

Weight: 49 pounds Pressure: 2,300 PSI Gallons per minute: 1.2 Power source: Electric Nozzles included: 3

Another professional-looking pressure washer, the Ryobi RY142300 cuts a few too many corners, which is curious because it is one of the more expensive machines in this field.

Whereas the Dewalt’s engine shuts off when the trigger is released, the Ryobi’s engine runs the whole time the machine is turned on. The Dewalt has 10-inch pneumatic wheels; the Ryobi has 12-inch plastic wheels. The Dewalt has five nozzles ranging from soft to abrasive; the Ryobi has a soft soap nozzle, an abrasive 15-degree nozzle, and a super abrasive turbo nozzle.

The Dewalt’s soap tank is easy to load, use, and empty; the Ryobi’s soap tank is dark, hard to load, and nigh impossible to empty. We could go on, but you get the idea.

On the positive side, it was quite effective at clearing away mud, sand, and even paint from all surfaces. It was even quiet when it was doing it, which was surprising because we found when pressing the trigger, the device has one heck of a recoil. You’ll definitely want to make sure the nozzles are completely attached, otherwise, you’ll have a dangerous projectile weapon.

In short, if we were just testing the Ryobi, we’d recommend it. But knowing there are other options out there with more user-friendly features, we’d advise looking elsewhere, especially for the price tag.

Pros

  • Runs fairly quietly

  • Effective at clearing away debris

  • Solid heft and build quality

Cons

  • Engine constantly runs

  • Spray wand has a heavy kick back

  • Difficult-to-use soap function

Product image of Sun Joe SPX3000
Sun Joe SPX3000

Weight: 31 pounds Pressure: 1,500 PSI Gallons per minute: 1.78 Power source: Electric Nozzles included: 5

Sun Joe SPX3000 quickly cleared mud and sand, but paint was more difficult to get off. Its engine was also a bit on the loud side.

We really liked how effortless it was to swap out spray tips on this machine. The color-coded nozzles (40-, 25-, 15-, 0-degree, and soap) snap in and out in the blink of an eye and easily store away on the backside of the device. Also included are two soap dispenser bottles, which were simple to load and use (we loved being able to adjust the detergent output with the dispenser dial).

We would like to see some small improvements with this model, like a better hose management system, and an improved garden hose hook-up. Whenever we turned the machine on, it would invariably blast streams of water from where the hose connects on the front, forcing us to lay the washer on its back to get the leverage needed to close the seal.

Pros

  • Spray tips are easy to swap in and out

  • Dispenser dial helps limit soap usage

  • Effective at clearing away loose materials

Cons

  • Garden hose hook-up is hard to use

  • Surprisingly loud

  • Hose management system isn’t great

Product image of Kärcher K 3 Follow Me
Karcher K3 Follow Me

Weight: 20 pounds Pressure: 1,800 PSI Gallons per minute: 1.3 Power source: Electric Nozzles included: 2

We really liked this model's versatility. The main nozzle is highly adjustable, going from a regular garden hose's pressure to powerful enough to strip paint from wood.

It also comes with a great rotary nozzle. What sets this model apart from the rest is that it moves on four wheels. With its low center of gravity, it's nigh impossible to tip the 20-pound K3 over.

Great cleaning, sleek design, and included features make the K3 a solid choice. However, there are more powerful pressure washers out there for a similar price.

Pros

  • Adjustable spray

  • Easy to move

Cons

  • Power supply issues

Product image of Sun Joe SPX1000
Sun Joe SPX1000

Weight: 15 pounds Pressure: 1,450 PSI Gallons per minute: 1.45 Power source: Electric Nozzles included: 1

When we first unpacked the Sun Joe SPX1000, we didn't have high hopes. The looser feel of some of the parts, lower PSI rating, and selling its detergent tank and specialty nozzles separately stacked the odds against it.

That being said, the SPX1000 utilized what it had better than most on this list, and was our best value option in our initial tests. We liked that it included a nozzle that could be adjusted from a higher-pressure pencil-sized stream to a 45-degree fan. This allowed us to power wash away dirt gently or strip paint.

Pros

  • Very adjustable

  • Easy to use

Cons

  • All attachments sold separately

Product image of Ryobi RY141612
Ryobi RY141612

Weight: 16 pounds Pressure: 1,600 PSI Gallons per minute: 1.2 Power source: Electric Nozzles included: 3

Our previous best pressure washer winner is certainly a solid device, especially for its size. It cleared mud and sand without much effort, and it actually worked quickly to remove paint from brick and pavement with its turbo nozzle.

Unfortunately, that powerful engine is quite loud, probably to make up for its small size. It is also a bit unwieldy to carry around and store since it’s only a little bigger than a car battery, but it has a 20-foot hose, a 35-foot power cord, and a 2-foot-long soap injection hose that somehow have to all get bound up together.

We previously didn’t test the soap function on this washer, butthis time around, we noticed how obnoxious it was to use. You have to use a bucket to hold the detergent mix, and then make sure the injection head is fully submerged, otherwise it’ll just suck up air.

When it does pull up soap, it does so rapidly, so make sure to have everything you want to clean ready to go. It just feels like the soap function was an afterthought, and it appears that many owners of this device plug up the soap intake and don’t even bother with it.

Pros

  • Effective at cleaning for its size

Cons

  • Difficult to store

  • Noisy

  • Soap function is effectively useless

Product image of Worx Hydroshot WG629
Worx WG629

Weight: 6 pounds Pressure: 355 PSI Gallons per minute: 0.53 Power source: Battery Nozzles included: 1

Among the models we tested, the handheld and battery-powered Worx WG629 was the most different from the rest. With 355 PSI, it's the perfect model for small jobs like washing the car. The WG629 can hook up to a hose, but it can also operate by drawing water from a bucket.

If you decide to purchase the WG629, understand that, in terms of power, it's just a step up from a garden hose. However, if you're looking for something to help wash your car and water your garden, the Worx will give you the right amount of power without taking up too much space, especially if you have a hose reel.

Pros

  • Easy to use

Cons

  • Weak power

How We Tested Pressure Washers

A person sprays a blue painted square on a brick wall with a pressure washer.
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

We painted blue squares on our brick exterior wall to see which pressure washers could clean it the best.

The Tester

I’m Nick Bove, a jack-of-all-trades broadcaster, announcer, and voiceover artist based out of Boston. Along with Jon Chan, the senior lab manager at Reviewed, I performed all the tests in this pressure washers roundup. I built upon Jon’s initial pressure washer testing with half a dozen new models.

The Tests

We tested on a variety of surfaces, ranging from asphalt to wood.
Credit: Reviewed / Jonathan Chan

We tested on a variety of surfaces, ranging from asphalt to wood.

I recently moved into a house, and it truly is amazing how many projects pop up when you’re responsible for your own space. As soon as one thing is finished, three more come out of nowhere. That’s where a tool like a pressure washer can help. Instead of spending hours scrubbing the outside of my house, a pressure washer can do the job in a quarter of the time.

While gas-powered pressure washers are also an option, we tested a number of the top-selling electric models across the market. All of them are marketed to homeowners, and we found that smaller machines with a lower intensity did the job just fine, even if they’re more light-than heavy-duty.

Look at the box of any electric or gas pressure washer, and you'll see something about PSI, GPM, or Amps. While all those specs are very interesting, what is really important is if the pressure washer can clean well and if it is easy to use.

For cleaning, we painted vinyl, wood, aluminum, brick, and asphalt and then covered each with half an inch of compacted dirt. We blasted each of these surfaces with the pressure washers on various settings and gauged how easily we could get rid of the dirt and not damage the paint. After the tough but gentle approach, we went full bore and tried to strip the exterior and spray paint off of all the surfaces.

Stripping paint is a tough job, even for a pressure washer.
Credit: Reviewed / Jonathan Chan

Stripping paint is a tough job, even for a pressure washer.

The pressure washers that proved exceptional were presented one last challenge: a clogged gutter. This gutter wasn't clogged with leaves but a man-made pseudo-sandstone created by mixing sand and flour. We tested to see if it could blast through without damaging the gutter.

Strong candidates were given the additional test of cleaning a clogged gutter.
Credit: Reviewed / Jonathan Chan

Strong candidates were given the additional test of cleaning a clogged gutter.

We also tested each device’s soap cleaning feature. We filled each soap intake tank or bottle with a pint of generic pressure washer detergent mixed with water, got a feel for how uniform the soap spray was, and noted how long the suds lasted.

What You Should Know About Buying Pressure Washers

A pressure washer nozzle blasts water at a square painted on the ground.
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

We tested pressure washers by blasting mud and paint.

Power Washing vs. Pressure Washing

Pressure washers are not the same as power washers. The major difference between the two is that power washers heat up water to aid in cleaning. Typically, power washers are reserved to remove mold, mildew, and heavy-duty stains like oil.

Pressure Washer Measurements

PSI: Pounds per square inch is the overall amount of power each pressure washer can put out. GPM: Gallons per minute measures the water flow rate

How to Pressure Wash a House

If the exterior of your house is made of hardboard, rock-dash, bottle-dash, or similar material, you should avoid pressure washing your walls. For safety’s sake, you should remember to cover any outdoor outlets, avoid using ladders while operating a pressure washer, and be wary of debris falling off your home or being kicked up off the ground.

We suggest you start with the 25- or 40-degree tip of the pressure washer for cleaning siding. You should start washing from top to bottom, in order to more efficiently deal with falling grime.

When you start your pressure washer, stand about three feet away from your target, and move toward it, as needed. This way, you’ll avoid applying too much pressure and damaging the surface you're trying to clean.

Pressure washers can damage lawns and shrubbery. So when you’re pressure washing walkways and patios, cover your delicate plants with plastic sheeting or drop cloths. You'll need to be careful and avoid outdoor furniture as well, although some cushions may fare OK using one.

What Kind of Hose You Should Use

While pressure washers have motors, a strong and even flow is required for them to work. One of the best garden hoses we’ve tested should do the trick.

Pressure Washer Detergents

Always read the owner’s manual to see what each model recommends. Beyond that, most pressure washer detergents come in the form of concentrates. That means you premix the solution with water before you place it into the unit.

This also means you should wear protective gloves while handling the cleaning solution.

There are some guides out there that suggest making a bleach solution for dealing with mold. We would not recommend that. Bleach is pretty toxic and having it splattered everywhere will not do you or your yard any favors.

Renting Pressure Washers

Many hardware stores, like The Home Depot provide pressure washers to rent. For one-time jobs, it can totally be worth it.

For example, if you’re planning on giving your house a once-over before putting it on the market, renting a pressure washer might be a good idea. However, if you’re settled in and planning on doing some cleaning every spring and summer, owning a pressure washer will pay for itself.

How to Winterize a Pressure Washer

Electric pressure washers are fairly simple to winterize. All you need to do is drain all the hoses and detergent tanks. To drain the hoses, detach them, unroll them, and hold them up—all the water should drain out.

Detergent tanks are also fairly simple. You can clean them out by simply flushing them out with a hose. Just be sure to let them dry out before storage. If you store your pressure washer in the basement, you can place it near a low-powered space heater to prevent any freezing.

If you live in a colder climate, you may also opt to fill the unit with anti-freeze designed for small pumps.

Meet the testers

Jonathan Chan

Jonathan Chan

Senior Manager of Lab Operations

@Jonfromthelab1

Jonathan Chan currently serves as the Lab Manager at Reviewed. If you clean with it, it's likely that Jon oversees its testing. Since joining the Reviewed in 2012, Jon has helped launch the company's efforts in reviewing laptops, vacuums, and outdoor gear. He thinks he's a pretty big deal. In the pursuit of data, he's plunged his hands into freezing cold water, consented to be literally dragged through the mud, and watched paint dry. Jon demands you have a nice day.

See all of Jonathan Chan's reviews
Nick Bove

Nick Bove

Contributor

@nickboveonair

Nick Bove is a journalist and broadcaster based out of Boston. He's currently a public address announcer at Boston University, Harvard, and Northeastern, and is breaking into the voiceover industry. He's also lent his voice as a professional hockey broadcaster and news anchor for NBC News Radio. When he isn't speaking into a microphone, he's probably on a long hike or daydreaming of being the next Bob Costas.

See all of Nick Bove's reviews

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