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The Best Woks and Stir-Fry Pans of 2022

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Editor's Choice Product image of HexClad 12" Hybrid Wok
Best Overall

HexClad 12" Hybrid Wok

This hybrid wok combines good quality with thoughtful design. Read More

Pros

  • Easy to season
  • Retains heat well and distributes heat evenly
  • Includes a lid

Cons

  • Needs re-seasoning
2
Editor's Choice Product image of ZhenSanHuan Hand Hammered Iron Wok with Wooden Handle
Best Upgrade

ZhenSanHuan Hand Hammered Iron Wok with Wooden Handle

This hand-hammered wok is gorgeous and easy to use. However, they may be limited to gas cooktops. Read More

Pros

  • Exceptional searing ability
  • Traditional shape
  • Easy to season

Cons

  • Doesn't work on electric cooktop
3
Editor's Choice Product image of Cooks Standard 13-inch Wok with Dome Lid

Cooks Standard 13-inch Wok with Dome Lid

Lightweight and easy to handle, this wok retains heat well and distributes it evenly. The included domed lid is a nice addition. Read More

Pros

  • Retains heat well and distributes evenly
  • Includes domed lid
  • Large surface area

Cons

  • Stainless steel rather than carbon steel
4
Product image of Calphalon Signature Hard-Anodized Nonstick 12-Inch Flat-Bottom Wok with Cover

Calphalon Signature Hard-Anodized Nonstick 12-Inch Flat-Bottom Wok with Cover

This sturdy nonstick wok is big enough to cook for a large group, but it’s slow to heat up and doesn’t do a great job of retaining heat. Read More

Pros

  • Flat-bottomed design
  • Nonstick

Cons

  • Too slow to heat up
  • Doesn't retain heat well
5
Product image of Souped Up Recipes Carbon Steel Wok

Souped Up Recipes Carbon Steel Wok

This lovely, traditional wok from Souped Up Recipes heats up quickly and makes pouring a breeze. However, it does struggle with heat retention. Read More

Pros

  • Pre-seasoned
  • Side spout helps pour easily
  • Heats up quickly

Cons

  • Struggles with heat retention
  • Flat lid

Woks are designed with stir-frying in mind—their concave shape concentrates heat on the bottom of the pan, creating a super-hot area that cooks your food more quickly, and the steep sides prevent splatter while giving you space to push cooked food up the sides.

They come in a dizzying array of shapes and sizes, with different handle types and construction materials. Without trying them, it’s hard to know which is the best wok for your kitchen.

Here at Reviewed, we want to take the guesswork out of buying a wok, which is why we tested a dozen woks made from carbon steel, cast iron, and stainless steel. Some had a nonstick coating while others could be seasoned to create a nonstick patina.

While the testing results were close, the HexClad 12-inch Hybrid Stainless Steel Nonstick Wok (available at Amazon) emerged as the best overall wok. If you’re looking to take your wok cooking to the next level, you may want to consider the ZhenSanHuan Hand-hammered Iron Wok (available at Amazon), our pick for the best upgrade.

We didn’t hate any of the pans, though. They all made delicious bowls of stir-fried noodles, but the ease and comfort of a few definitely made them stand out as our favorites.

Here are the best woks we tested ranked, in order:

  1. HexClad 12-inch Hybrid
  2. ZhenSanHuan Hand-Hammered Iron Wok
  3. Cooks Standard 13-Inch Multi-Ply Clad Stainless Steel Wok
  4. Calphalon Signature Hard-Anodized Nonstick 12-Inch
  5. Souped Up Recipes Carbon Steel Wok
  6. Lodge 14-Inch Cast Iron Wok
  7. Joyce Chen 22-0040 Pro Chef Flat Bottom Wok
  8. Craft Wok Traditional Hand-Hammered Carbon Steel Pow Wok
  9. Yosukata Carbon Steel Wok
  10. T-fal Specialty Nonstick Wok
  11. Joyce Chen 22-0060, Pro Chef Flat Bottom Wok
  12. Made In Blue Carbon Wok
A person is lifting the lid off of a wok full of cooked vegetables.
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

The HexClad Hybrid Wok is gorgeous and easy to use.

Best Overall
HexClad 12-inch Hybrid Stainless Nonstick Wok
  • Material: Hybrid stainless steel
  • Type: Flat bottom
  • Weight: 4.5 pounds

The HexClad 12-inch wok is exceptionally light and easy to maneuver—we had no problem tossing vegetables and stir frying denser ingredients such as noodles. This flat-bottom wok is on the shallow end of the woks we’ve tried, but it’s still roomy enough to hold large amounts of food.

It’s made of a hybrid of two materials: stainless steel for the exterior and hard anodized nonstick coating for the interior. This wok has a laser-etched design with raised hex and dot ridges to sear cuts of meat, which proved to produce some of the best stir-fried beef during testing.

When it comes to cleaning, a gentle rinse under warm, soapy water is sufficient. Easy clean-up is key if you regularly use a wok.

We were especially impressed with the nonstick properties of this HexClad Wok, but previous testing of HexClad’s cookware sets proved seasoning was necessary for the pans to be truly nonstick.

Pros

  • Easy to season

  • Retains heat well and distributes heat evenly

  • Includes a lid

Cons

  • Needs re-seasoning

A person is using a spatula to stir a medley of vegetables in a carbon steel wok.
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

The hand-hammered ZhenSanHuan is the best upgrade choice.

Best Upgrade
ZhenSanHuan Hand Hammered Iron Wok with Wooden Handle
  • Material: Carbon steel
  • Type: Round bottom
  • Weight: 3.74 pounds

As far as a traditional hand-hammered wok goes, the ZhenSanHuan is a true standout. We were mesmerized by the patina-like, glossy nonstick surface with a blue-ish undertone. The brand claims that each wok goes through 30,000 strokes of hand hammering—whether it’s true or not, the hand-hammered effect is certainly visible and appealing.

During testing, we were impressed with how quickly it heated up and how the smooth surface helped toss vegetables and cuts of meat with ease. While cooking a stir-fried beef dish, the strips of marinated beef immediately started to bubble around the edges, a clear sign of sufficiently high heat. Then, we flipped the beef and it didn’t stick to the pot, flexing its nonstick property.

This wok isn’t without flaws, though. The base model doesn’t come with a lid, which means you won’t be able to use it as a steamer unless you buy the lid à la carte. Also, its carbon steel construction entails more maintenance than the nonstick woks we’ve tested.

A final major caveat is its relatively circular bottom, which means it’ll not work as well on electric or gas cooktops without a wok burner.

Pros

  • Exceptional searing ability

  • Traditional shape

  • Easy to season

Cons

  • Doesn't work on electric cooktop


Other Woks We Tested

Product image of Cooks Standard 13-inch Wok with Dome Lid
Cooks Standard 13-Inch Wok
  • Material: Stainless steel
  • Type: Flat bottom
  • Weight: 3.93 pounds

The Cooks Standard 13-Inch Wok, compared to others we tested, has more surface area on the bottom, making it a hybrid between a favorite skillet and a wok. However, the rounded, sloped sides were effective at holding cooked food as we went, and it was light enough to toss the vegetables while we stir-fried.

This pan was also our favorite for deep-frying potato chips, creating minimal splatter and perfectly browning the chips on all sides.

It’s worth noting that traditionalists don’t like stainless steel woks because they take longer to heat up and don't usually heat as evenly as carbon steel pans. However, while the Cooks Standard took longer to heat up, we were impressed at how effectively it retained that heat. The aluminum core and multi-clad metal construction was a game changer, making the pan light enough to use comfortably while also creating even heating with little to no hot spots.

Pros

  • Retains heat well and distributes evenly

  • Includes domed lid

  • Large surface area

Cons

  • Stainless steel rather than carbon steel

Product image of Calphalon Signature Hard-Anodized Nonstick 12-Inch Flat-Bottom Wok with Cover
Calphalon Signature Hard-Anodized Nonstick 12-Inch Flat-Bottom Wok with Cover
  • Material: Non-stick, hard-anodized aluminum
  • Type: Flat bottom
  • Weight: 8.2 pounds

The Calphalon Signature 12-inch Wok is simple and practical, featuring a smooth nonstick finish with hard-anodized construction, making it durable and relatively lightweight. It comes with a glass lid, which fits snugly on top.

Thanks to its PTFE nonstick coating, using and cleaning this Calphalon was a breeze. And the second stainless steel handle on the opposite side helped us lift up and transport the wok easily during and after cooking.

This wok is ideal when it comes to cooking for a crowd. The edges of this wok are slightly curved outwards—a small detail that encourages easy pouring of the foods once cooking is done.

The downside is that this wok took more than five minutes to heat up. Additionally, the heat retention was rather disappointing—we saw dramatic temperature fluctuations during the deep frying test. Conversely, the lid gets hot quickly during cooking, so we recommend wearing oven mitts when handling it.

Another drawback is the steep side of the wok, which made it hard to fit a ton of food when deep frying, unless we added extra oil, which defeated the purpose of using a wok for deep frying in order to conserve oil.

Pros

  • Flat-bottomed design

  • Nonstick

Cons

  • Too slow to heat up

  • Doesn't retain heat well

Product image of Souped Up Recipes Carbon Steel Wok
Souped Up Recipes Carbon Steel Wok
  • Material: Carbon steel
  • Type: Flat bottom
  • Weight: 5.35 pounds

The pre-seasoned Souped Up Carbon Steel Wok is gorgeous, featuring a dimpled flat bottom and a wooden lid that resembles that of a traditional Chinese wok.

The addition of a spout on the side helps pour the cooked food effortlessly. It took two rinses to take off the protective coating and the helpful user manual guided us through the process. The manual also has plenty of tips for later uses, how to build seasoning, and recipe suggestions.

We were impressed by how quickly this wok brought oil to frying temperature—it only took us three minutes to go from 75°F to 280°F. But temperature consistency was a constant struggle as we started to fry potatoes in the pan. This wok either dropped temperature more dramatically than needed for deep frying or couldn’t stop from overheating.

Another minor quibble we had was with the wooden lid. Though it’s beautiful and great for retaining the heat when simmering and steaming, we prefer a domed glass lid so we can better monitor the cooking process.

Pros

  • Pre-seasoned

  • Side spout helps pour easily

  • Heats up quickly

Cons

  • Struggles with heat retention

  • Flat lid

Product image of Lodge 14-Inch Cast Iron Wok
Lodge 14-Inch Cast Iron Wok
  • Material: Cast iron
  • Type: Flat bottom
  • Weight: 11.48 pounds

There was a lot to love about the American-made Lodge 14-Inch Cast Iron Wok, but one major flaw dropped it down a few notches on our list. Cast iron is heavy, and this pan weighs more than 11 pounds.

The Cantonese-style handles on each side made it easy enough to lift, but between the pan’s heft and lack of a long handle, it was impossible to toss the vegetables.

On the plus side, the Lodge wok created beautifully seared food, and it didn’t budge on the stovetop as we used it (even when we really tried). That stability makes it ideal for deep frying, and the beautiful pan can double as a serving dish if you bring it straight to the table. Just make sure to grip the handles with oven mitts, because the handles got super hot.

Pros

  • Cantonese-style (short) handles

  • Sears and deep fries beautifully

  • Sturdy

Cons

  • Extremely heavy

  • Difficult to maneuver

Product image of Joyce Chen Pro Chef 14" Excalibur Nonstick Wok
Joyce Chen Pro Chef 14-Inch Excalibur Nonstick Wok
  • Material: Carbon steel
  • Type: Flat bottom
  • Weight: 4.45 pounds

As compared to the other pans, the Joyce Chen Pro Chef 14-Inch Excalibur Nonstick Wok was heavier than we expected. Most nonstick pans are relatively light, but this one definitely had some heft (especially when it was full of food).

We weren’t impressed with the evenness of heating, and it had hot spots all over the place. While we loved the traditional shape, we found the slopes too slippery to move food around effectively.

Pros

  • Traditional shape

  • Nonstick

Cons

  • Heavy for nonstick cookware

  • Heats unevenly

  • Sloped nonstick sides too slippery

Product image of Craft Wok Traditional Hand Hammered Carbon Steel Pow Wok
Craft Wok Traditional Hand Hammered Carbon Steel Pow Wok
  • Material: Carbon steel
  • Type: Round bottom
  • Weight: 4.6 pounds

Overall, we were pretty happy with the performance of the Craft Wok Traditional Hand Hammered Carbon Steel Pow Wok. It looks absolutely gorgeous, too, with its hand-hammered carbon steel and wooden handle.

Unfortunately, the rounded bottom means this wok isn’t for everyone. If you own an electric stove, you’ll need to pick up a wok ring so the cookware can balance above the element.

And while we love the quick-and-even heating of carbon steel, keep in mind that the seasoning process requires some patience. It was easy enough to season, but time-consuming nonetheless.

Pros

  • Hand-hammered carbon steel construction

  • Attractive looking

Cons

  • Not ideal for electric stoves

Product image of Yosukata 14" Black Carbon Steel Wok Pre-Seasoned
Yosukata 14" Black Carbon Steel Wok Pre-Seasoned
  • Material: Carbon steel
  • Type: Round bottom
  • Weight: 3.8 pounds

The Yousukata has a more rounded bottom than the other woks we tested, but it didn’t negatively impact its performance. When our tester tilted the wok slightly toward her on the grated gas stovetop, it worked out fine. However, this wok may just be less suitable for an electric or induction cooktop.

This pre-seasoned carbon steel wok heats up quickly and is relatively easy to re-season and care for. If you’re looking for some restaurant-quality stir fry, this wok won’t disappoint.

However, when it comes to ease of use, the wooden handle wasn’t the most comfortable to hold and the pan was heavy to carry around. We also noticed hot spots in the middle during testing, which prevented food from getting cooked evenly.

Pros

  • Pre-seasoned

  • Heats up quickly

Cons

  • May not be suitable for an electric cooktop

  • Uncomfortable handle

Product image of T-fal 14" Nonstick Jumbo Wok
T-fal 14-Inch Nonstick Jumbo Wok
  • Material: Non-stick aluminum
  • Type: Flat bottom
  • Weight: 2 pounds

You might be attracted to the budget price of the T-fal 14-Inch Nonstick Jumbo Wok, but it definitely wouldn’t be our first choice.

The PFOA-free nonstick coating made the pan easy to clean, and on the plus-side it was one of the lightest pans we tested. It was fun to flip vegetables, but it was nearly impossible to get a hard sear on the food.

This type of coating is not ideal for use in high-heat cooking as it can break down quickly over time. Since that's kind of what woks are all about, it's a bit of a deal-breaker.

Pros

  • Nonstick

  • Easy to clean

Cons

  • High heat damages the nonstick coating

  • Doesn't sear well

Product image of Joyce Chen Pro Chef 14" Carbon Steel Wok
Joyce Chen Pro Chef 14-Inch Carbon Steel Wok
  • Material: Carbon steel
  • Type: Flat bottom
  • Weight: 4.14 pounds

We were less than impressed with the Joyce Chen Pro Chef 14-Inch Carbon Steel Wok. Like the other carbon steel wok we tested, it heated up quickly and didn’t have many observable hot spots. However, we had a hard time seasoning this wok, and it left us with a burnt base and nearly clean sides.

Overall, it did a nice job at stir-frying our vegetables and deep-frying potatoes, but it was too heavy and the back handle got in the way as we tossed food. All in all, we prefer some of the other woks better than this one.

Pros

  • Heats quickly and evenly

Cons

  • Heavy

  • Difficult to season evenly

  • Rear handle gets in the way when tossing

Product image of Made In Blue Carbon Steel Wok
Made In Blue Carbon Steel Wok
  • Material: Carbon steel
  • Type: Flat bottom
  • Weight: 4.38 pounds

Despite being able to sear beef perfectly, the Made In Carbon Steel Wok was the least user-friendly one we’ve tested. It’s on the heavier side of the woks in this list, which made tossing vegetables feel like an arm workout.

The heft also made pouring out cooked food hard. Typically, a wok features a second handle on the opposite side so you can easily lift up the pot using both hands.

Unlike most of the other unseasoned woks we’ve covered in this round-up, Made In’s wok did not come with a user manual explaining how to season it. After a little internet research, we eventually figured it out.

During the pre-wash, we had a difficult time thoroughly washing off the black protective coating and it took us six times to run them off under soapy water. In comparison, the other woks required three washes in soapy water, tops.

This wok could be good for searing large pieces of meat, but generally speaking, we think there are much better models out there.

Pros

  • Sturdy carbon steel construction

  • Good for searing meat

Cons

  • Not user-friendly

  • Too heavy

  • No user manual

How We Tested Woks

Credit: Reviewed /Lindsay D. Mattison

Did you know you can use your wok as a deep fryer?

The Tester

I’m Valerie, Senior Staff Writer on the Kitchen & Cooking team. A wok is a piece of cookware that means a lot to me personally, both as a practical cooking vessel (I use one every day) and a sentimental item, as I grew up watching my dad cook dinner using his carbon steel wok.

And I’m Lindsay Mattison, a trained professional chef and a vegetable lover. It’s not uncommon to find veggies taking up half of my dinner plate, which is hilarious because I was the pickiest eater as a kid! While I’m all about cooking up a sheet pan dinner or grilling my vegetables, high-heat searing is my favorite way to cook these gems. Using a wok to stir-fry vegetables is a nutritious, colorful, and delicious way to put dinner on the table—fast!

The Tests

A person is pouring out a medley of vegetables from a wok into a bowl.
Credit: Reviewed / Betsey Goldwasser

We put the woks through multiple cooking tests to find the best ones.

For our first round of testing, we chose highly-rated woks made from carbon steel, cast iron, and stainless steel. We picked a good mix of non-stick and seasoned woks to see if any particular design or construction stood out from the rest. In a second round of testing, we sought out additional woks from popular direct-to-consumer brands, as well as handmade woks that emphasize on craftsmanship.

To test their searing ability, overall ease of use, and durability, we stir-fried meat, vegetables, and noodles before tossing them all together to create a deliciously saucy bowl. We also heated the empty pans and measured for hot spots with an infrared thermometer and deep-fried potato chips to see how well the woks would retain their heat.

In the end, we were surprised to find that the woks were all on a relatively even playing field when it came to overall cooking ability. All the pans not only cooked beautiful food, but they were all easy to clean, too.

So where did the top pans pull away from the pack? They were lighter and had comfortable helper handles. We also awarded bonus points if it was easy to remove the food from the pan, too.

What to Know about Woks

Woks are famous for high-heat searing in stir-fry dishes, but they are more versatile than just being stir fry pans.

They can do everything saute pans can do—and so much more. Woks are great for cooking down bulky vegetables like spinach, and you can deep-fry foods with a fraction of the oil required in a straight-edged pan.

And, if you have a dome-shaped lid for your wok pan, you can also use steamer baskets to make dumplings, smoke whole chickens, or pop popcorn without any splatter.

What to Consider When Purchasing a Wok

Given all the ways a wok can be used, it’s important to get the right one for you. Here are some things to consider.

Material:

Woks are made with a number of materials—each with pros and cons.

Carbon steel: The traditional wok material, carbon steel is a light-weight metal that’s effective at conducting heat. It heats evenly and retains heat well, but it requires a time-consuming seasoning process to prevent it from rusting. Once it's seasoned, though, it will develop a nonstick coating over time.

Cast iron: Although excellent at heat retention, cast iron woks take some time to heat up. Also, they’re heavy, so it’s difficult to toss vegetables. Most cast iron woks come pre-seasoned, and that seasoning will continue to improve over time.

Stainless steel: These woks have more heft than carbon steel, but they're lighter than cast iron. Like cast iron, these pans take longer to heat up, but they end up retaining that heat better than carbon steel. Since these pans don't have any coating, they're usually dishwasher safe, too.

Nonstick or hard-anodized aluminum pans: These pans are ideal for ease of cleaning, but the same coating that keeps food from sticking makes it hard to get a high-heat sear.

Shape

Traditional woks, which have round, wobbly bottoms, are not exactly compatible with modern American kitchens. You can purchase rings designed to support these types of pans, but they can elevate the pan too high above the cooking surface’s heating element, defeating the purpose of this high-heat, flash-searing cookware. Another option is flat-bottomed woks, which work perfectly with electric, induction, and gas ranges.

How to Season a Wok

Credit: Reviewed /Lindsay D. Mattison

Seasoning carbon steel pans is relatively straightforward, but it does require a time commitment.

Most cast iron and nonstick woks come pre-seasoned, but you’ll need to season any carbon steel wok before its first use. The process is relatively straightforward, albeit time-consuming.

Start by scrubbing the pan with hot, soapy water to remove the manufacturer’s coating. Then, dry it thoroughly and set it over high heat. The wok will start to turn a blueish-blackish color.

When the wok is hot, coat it with a teaspoon or two of neutral cooking oil (such as canola, vegetable, or peanut oil). Hold a wadded-up paper towel with a set of tongs and rub the oil over the interior of the wok. Heat over medium-low heat for 10 minutes and wipe off the oil with a new paper towel.

Let the pan cool before repeating the oil-and-heating steps until the paper towel does not have any black residue (it usually takes about three or four times in total).

Once the pan is seasoned, you don’t want to use any detergents to clean the wok—that will remove the seasoning, and you’d have to go through the seasoning process again. Treat these carbon-steel woks like your favorite cast iron pan and rinse them with hot water before drying them thoroughly. After each use, rub them with a thin layer of cooking oil before storing to prevent rusting.

Meet the testers

Lindsay D. Mattison

Lindsay D. Mattison

Professional Chef

@zestandtang

Lindsay D. Mattison is a professional chef, food writer, and amateur gardener. She is currently writing a cookbook that aims to teach home cooks how to write without a recipe.

See all of Lindsay D. Mattison's reviews
Valerie Li Stack

Valerie Li Stack

Senior Staff Writer

@

Valerie Li Stack is a senior staff writer for Kitchen & Cooking. She is an experienced home cook with a passion for experimenting with the cuisines of countries she's visited. Driven by an interest in food science, Valerie approaches the culinary scene with a firm grasp of cooking processes and extensive knowledge of ingredients. She believes food speaks to all people regardless of language and cultural background.

See all of Valerie Li Stack's reviews

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