• Logitech MX Anywhere 2S

  • Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro

  • HP Wireless Mouse X4000

  • How We Tested

  • What You Should Know About Wireless Mice

  • Other Wireless Mice We Tested

  • More Articles You Might Enjoy

Our Favorite Wireless Mice of 2020

  1. Best Overall

    Logitech MX Anywhere 2S

    Pros

    • Can navigate any surface

    • Excellent battery life

    Cons

    • No storage compartment for dongle

    Skip to the full review below
  2. Best Value

    HP Wireless Mouse X4000

    Pros

    • Customizable

    • Connects up to five devices

    Cons

    • Scroll wheel feels hard

    Skip to the full review below
Best Overall
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar
Best Overall
Logitech MX Anywhere 2S

This mouse packs a lot of features into its small frame. The MX Anywhere 2S lives up to its name, able to track and navigate on any surface, including glass, with high precision. It's powered by a rechargeable battery offering up to 70 days of life on a single charge, so there's no need to scramble to find extra batteries if the mouse suddenly stops working. You can also use the MX Anywhere 2S as a wired mouse when connecting to a computer via the included USB charging cable.

The mouse can connect wirelessly via its included USB dongle or Bluetooth, and up to three computers can be paired to the mouse via the Easy Switch button.

The MX Anywhere 2S includes support for Logitech's FLOW software (download separately), which lets you copy and paste files across different computers. In our testing, we could move files from a Windows 10 desktop (the mouse was connected via Bluetooth) to a USB dongle-connected MacBook Pro notebook by just clicking and dragging between the two screens. It's an amazing piece of software that solves a problem of file transfer between two systems without needing a storage device, hard-wired connection, or internet cloud storage.

The MX Anywhere 2S also features our favorite scroll wheel option—the ability to switch between a click-style scroll (some call it detent) and a smooth scroll by just pushing the wheel with your finger.

The Logitech Options software (a separate download) also features several choices to customize the mouse's buttons for even more options. For example, if you want to adjust the volume of your music, you can assign that task to one of the mouse buttons.

Our biggest complaint for this and the Logitech MX Master 3 mouse, a larger model that we also tested, is there's no storage compartment for the USB dongle, increasing the likelihood that you might lose it. While you could still use the mouse via Bluetooth, we prefer having a storage option for the USB dongle. But that's hardly a major concern, and for most people, this high-performance mouse offers everything you need and more.

Pros

  • Can navigate any surface

  • Excellent battery life

Cons

  • No storage compartment for dongle

Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro
Credit: Reviewed.com/Simon Hill

The Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro is our favorite wireless gaming mouse.

Best Gaming
Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro

Combining unparalleled comfort and an impressive set of features in a relatively affordable package, the Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro is ready to serve as your reliable gaming wingman. It’s a right-handed mouse with a grippy texture on the palm rest and the thumb wing on the left-hand side. The panel on the right can be removed and replaced with an optional pinkie wing to keep your fingers out of the way of the action. Wireless connectivity is smooth as butter, with a choice of 2.4 GHz or Bluetooth connections, and the sensor tops out at 18,000 DPI with an unmatched 2,000 Hz maximum polling rate.

You can find gaming mice with more buttons, but the eight programmable buttons on offer will be enough for most gamers. There are nine separate RGB lighting zones, and a side indicator to show the DPI preset you’re currently on. Every detail can be customized in Corsair’s iCue software. There’s a definite learning curve, but the depth of customizability is excellent. Strong battery life, offering up to 50 hours, is bolstered by a USB-C port that allows you to plug in. If you don't mind spending more the "SE" model comes with support for Qi wireless charging, though the premium most retailers charge for the feature wasn't worth it in our book.

What’s really amazing about the Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro is the $79.99 price, which makes it an amazing value for the quality and feature set.

Pros

  • Lots of useful buttons

  • Customizable lighting

  • Comfortable

Cons

  • Best with palm grip

Best Value
Credit: Reviewed / Jackson Ruckar
Best Value
HP Wireless Mouse X4000

If you're looking to spend less money and don't need as many button customizations, the best option is the HP Wireless Mouse X4000 ($30 MSRP).

This mouse supports HP's Link-5 technology that connects up to five devices via the same USB dongle. If you have limited USB port options and want to connect a mouse and keyboard or other compatible devices, you could use one USB dongle instead of two or more. This technology only applies to Link-5 compatible devices, though, making it useless for cross-device functions (for example, if you wanted to use a Logitech keyboard and HP mouse).

The X4000 worked well on all of our surface tests save for the glass tabletop, and it felt good in the hands of both small-sized and larger-sized hands. We were less impressed with the scroll wheel—there's no smooth-scrolling option and it felt harder than other mice, meaning we needed to exert more effort when scrolling. The extra effort could increase the chance of wrist pain after long periods of using the mouse.

On the bright side, HP touts a staggering 30-month battery life (2.5 years!) for the X4000, which is powered by two AA batteries. Removing the batteries is a bit tricky, as the mouse's faceplate doubles as the battery cover. Most battery covers on wireless mice are located on the bottom. In our testing, the top of the case/faceplate also tended to catch on one of the mouse buttons. However, the long battery life adds serious value to the bottom line, helping to make this a great buy on a budget.

Pros

  • Customizable

  • Connects up to five devices

Cons

  • Scroll wheel feels hard

Related content

How We Tested

The Testers

I am Simon Hill and I have more than a decade of experience reviewing all sorts of consumer technology. I work on a computer all day and often play games into the night, so a good wireless mouse is essential to me.

I'm Keith Shaw, and I've reviewed consumer technology products for more than 15 years, including several varieties and sizes of computer mice in the pre-wireless days. This includes mice that operated with a hard rubber ball that you would routinely clean lint out of after a few months of use.

The Tests

We used each mouse for at least three days, testing it on multiple different surfaces. Every wireless mouse worked through a normal day and then joined us for gaming sessions. We assessed the design, the comfort in both the short and long term, the connectivity, ease of setup, and customization options. We also tested for accuracy, responsiveness, and battery life. There’s inevitably some personal taste when it comes to picking a mouse, with both hand size and grip preference coming into play, but luckily, most modern mice perform admirably.

What You Should Know About Wireless Mice

How to Choose a Wireless Mouse

  • Size, weight, and feel: Choosing the right size and weight for you is all about how a mouse feels in hand, so it’s a good idea to test them out before you buy whenever possible. Most wireless mice are designed for right-handed people, so southpaws have a slightly more limited choice. You’ll want to take your preferred grip style (discussed above) into account.

  • Programmable buttons: Some wireless mice offer buttons that can be remapped using the manufacturer’s software. Many of them offer extra buttons that you can map to specific shortcuts, such as page forward or back for smoother browsing. Some may even allow you to create macros that trigger a series of actions with a single button press. Taking the time to configure a mouse with the shortcuts you need can really boost your productivity, but if you aren’t going to use them, they may just get in the way.

  • Customizable lighting: RGB lighting seems to be a standard feature in gaming mice now. It’s easy to turn off if you don’t care for it, but if you like to enhance your gaming with a lightshow then you should check into the manufacturer’s software and see how many customizable lighting zones your prospective mouse has and where they are. Just remember that lighting will reduce your battery life.

  • Portability: If you plan to take your wireless mouse on the road, you might want to check that there’s a compartment to store the USB receiver in. Gaming mice can often store customized profiles onboard.

  • Platform support: The majority of wireless mice will work happily on Windows or Mac, but if you want a mouse you can use on other platforms and it’s important to be able to switch between them, you need to check into the manufacturer’s software. For example, Logitech’s FLOW software makes it easy to switch between three different connected devices at the touch of a button.

Terms You Should Know

  • DPI: Dots Per Inch is the number of pixels your cursor can move across per inch of movement from your hand. While you may assume higher is better, it really depends on your preferences, screen resolution, and the game you’re playing. The term is particularly notable for a gaming mouse, most of which will offer several preset DPI levels and make it easy for you to switch as required.

  • RGB: This stands for Red Blue Green and means you can change the color of the lights on your mouse, an option that’s popular in gaming mice. Another gaming friendly feature, most gaming mice have some RGB lighting, but the number of zones and the available lighting effects differ from device to device and brand to brand.

  • Grip styles: Palm, Claw, and Fingertip are the three main grip styles you’ll hear about. Most people have a preferred grip style, but it’s not uncommon to change your grip throughout the day. Generally, larger, heavier mice favor a palm grip while smaller, lighter mice work well with a fingertip grip.

  • Polling rate: This refers to how often your mouse is checking its position and reporting it to your computer and is measured in Hertz (Hz). A polling rate of 1,000 Hz indicates that your mouse is reporting its position 1,000 times per second. If you like to use a high DPI, then you’ll want a high polling rate to go with it.


Other Wireless Mice We Tested

Logitech MX Master 3

Clearly from the same family as Logitech's MX Anywhere 2S, the MX Master 3 is suitable for people with larger hands and has a special thumb rest on the left side, which also offers programmable buttons and a handy second scroll wheel within easy reach. This mouse is fast and accurate, with a laser sensor that works on any surface and a maximum 4,000 DPI setting. Wireless connectivity via the USB dongle over 2.4 GHz ensures no lag, and there’s also Bluetooth support as a backup.

The Logitech Options software enables you to finetune sensitivity and customize the buttons, and there’s also the option to pair with up to three devices at once and switch between them with a button press. Logitech’s Flow technology even enables you to copy and paste from one computer to another, which can offer a real productivity boost. This supremely comfortable mouse can go a couple of months between charges, and recharges quickly via the USB-C port. Compared to its predecessor, the MX Master 2S, the Master 3 is lighter with better scroll wheels, a more comfortable shape, and an upgrade to USB-C.

Pros

  • Great for larger hands

  • Innovative scroll wheel

Cons

  • No storage compartment for dongle

Logitech MX Vertical

If you suffer from muscle strain, the Logitech MX Vertical is for you. This strange-looking device is designed to keep your hand at a comfortable 57-degree angle, like you’re going in for a handshake. The idea is that you don’t need to contort your muscles as much throughout the day. It has regular left and right mouse buttons with a scroll wheel in the middle but there are also four customizable buttons that you can use to set up single shortcuts or even macros.

Accuracy is excellent, thanks to a laser sensor that goes up to 4,000 DPI. Logitech suggests you should get four months of use from a full charge and this mouse can be charged up rapidly via the USB-C port. You need to install the Logitech Options software to fully configure the mouse and get the most from it. One of the best features is powered by Logitech Flow, which enables you to pair with up to three computers simultaneously and switch between them with a button press; you can even copy/paste between computers.

Pros

  • Very comfortable

  • Great battery life

Cons

  • Grip takes getting used to

  • No storage compartment for dongle

Razer Basilisk Ultimate

Any gamer with cash to spare and a yearning for a stunning wireless gaming mouse with its own charging dock should cast an eye on the Razer Basilisk Ultimate. The mouse’s durable, right-handed design offers clever features like textured side panels that add grip and a thumb rest to ensure comfort and control, especially for larger hands that favor a palm grip. The 2.4 GHz wireless connection eliminates lag completely. Movement is tracked accurately across any surface, thanks to a sensor that tops out at 20,000 DPI.

Using Razer’s Synapse software, you can remap 11 programmable buttons, set up macros, and save up to five profiles in the onboard memory. You’ll also find a host of lighting effects for the mouse’s lighting zones, or you can use Chroma studio to create your own effects and apply them to the mouse or its charging dock. Battery life is good enough to see you through a marathon gaming session and it’s simple to pop the Basilisk on to the charging cradle when you’re done. You can also plug in the cable directly to the Micro USB port if you prefer. This is a wonderful wireless gaming mouse that’s a joy to use, but the price will be too steep for most people.

Pros

  • Lots of useful buttons

  • Customizable lighting

  • Sniper paddle and charge dock

Cons

  • Very expensive

Logitech G502 Lightspeed

The latest wireless version of one the most popular and beloved gaming mice ever, the Logitech G502 Lightspeed has everything. The classic angular design remains unaltered at first glance, but Logitech has managed to shave a few grams off the weight and pack in new technology. Silky smooth performance, excellent responsiveness, and laser accuracy are assured with a sensor that goes up to 16,000 DPI. The wireless receiver offers a reliable connection with no discernible lag whatsoever.

What sets this mouse apart is the sheer range of customization options. There are 11 programmable buttons and you can assign different macro and shortcut commands to them for different games with Logitech’s G hub software. The rich RGB lighting comes with various lighting effects, you can create your own, and you can sync with the gameplay on screen. This mouse even comes with a set of weights, so you can finetune the balance. Battery life isn’t great, especially if you like lighting effects, but you can plug in via the USB-C cable provided. If you’re feeling particularly flush, you might consider the compatible Powerplay wireless charging mouse pad.

Pros

  • Feature packed

  • Classic design

  • Wireless charging

Cons

  • Expensive

Kensington SureTrack Any Surface Wireless Bluetooth Mouse

A great option in the "track anywhere" category is the Bluetooth-only wireless SureTrack model. If you travel a lot and find yourself in hotels with glass-topped desks, this is a great mouse to have—its small size won't weigh down your travel bag, you won't have to worry about losing a USB dongle, and you will be able to easily track on glass surfaces.

The smaller design wasn't a hit with our larger-hand testers, but the small-hand contingent liked the feel of the mouse. There aren't any additional customization options like with some of the other mice tested.

One feature we appreciated: The mouse sports an LED on its top that will light up when the battery is about to die, giving you some notice to find a replacement.

Pros

  • Travel-friendly

  • Lights up when battery is about to die

Cons

  • Not many features

Microsoft Surface Precision Mouse

This Microsoft model was a hit with our testers who had larger hands, giving them a better comfort fit than the smaller-sized mice.

The mouse can switch between a smooth scroll feel and the click style, and it can pair with up to three devices at a time. The charging cable can be used as a wired connection, and there are four customizable buttons, utilized via a separate Mouse and Keyboard Center software download. The mouse also worked well on all of our surface (pun not intended) tests, including glass.

The biggest problem we had with this mouse was the fact that it's really only designed for Windows 10 systems. The Bluetooth didn't work with our Mac, and the drivers crashed one of our Windows 7 systems. There is a warning on the box that a specific Bluetooth version is required, so if you want this mouse, make sure you have the right computer system before buying.

Pros

  • Great for larger hands

  • Works well on most surfaces

Cons

  • Only designed for Windows 10 systems

Logitech M720 Triathalon

Like the other Logitech mice we tested, the M720 Triathlon offers both USB dongle and Bluetooth connectivity options. Unlike the MX series, the M720 Triathlon features a USB dongle storage compartment inside the battery area. Logitech touts a very long 24-month battery life with a single AA battery, which is impressive.

The size of the M720 is appealing to those with larger hands. It also supports the Logitech Options and FLOW software, giving you some button customization features. In our tracking tests, the M720 worked fine on all of our surfaces except for the glass tabletop.

The scroll wheel supports both the click and smooth styles but activating this is done with a separate button push. Overall, this is a less expensive option for people looking for the Logitech software options compared with the MX series.

Pros

  • Inexpensive

  • Long battery life

Cons

  • Doesn't work well on glass

HP X3000 Wireless Mouse

This mouse offers the bare minimum features and options. It's also the lowest-priced option among the mice we tested. At an MSRP of $20, you could get this for less via Amazon and other retailers.

The X3000 was also the smallest of all the mice we tested—it was even too small for small-hand testers. If you need a basic mouse for your kids to use, gravitate toward this one. No customization features or extra buttons on this, either, and you're stuck with only a click scroll wheel. You can also forget about tracking on glass—it won't work.

Pros

  • Affordable

  • No frills

Cons

  • Too small

Apple Magic Mouse 2

Apple's latest mouse is a great option if you intend to use it only on a newer Apple computer (OS X v. 10.11 or higher). It will still work with older systems (and Windows if you really want to), but then you won't get access to the mouse's greatest feature—the ability to use your finger as the scroll option on the surface of the mouse.

We weren't sure if we'd like this option, but scrolling over long web pages was a nice feeling, and it caused a change in how the mouse was handled. Instead of gripping the mouse with a whole hand, we used only a thumb and ring finger to control the mouse's movement, saving the middle and index fingers for scrolling and clicking.

The Magic Mouse 2 includes a rechargeable battery that is charged via an included Lightning cable that will also automatically pair with its Macintosh computer when connected, so you don't have to mess with Bluetooth settings. Like many Apple products, the Magic Mouse 2 costs more than you'd expect—the $79.99 mouse falls in line with some of the other top-end mice I tested here, but with fewer features and almost no customization. There are some custom features, but they're more interesting than useful in daily use.

If you're looking for an all-purpose mouse, skip the Apple model. But if you're a diehard Apple fan, you'll enjoy using this mouse. Even our larger-hand brethren enjoyed its feel and comfort.

Pros

  • Includes a rechargeable battery

Cons

  • Expensive

Meet the testers

Keith Shaw

Keith Shaw

Contributor

@shawkeith

Keith Shaw is the owner of CoolTools-Reviews.com. He's also the main writer, editor, videographer and all-around-go-to-guy.

See all of Keith Shaw's reviews
Simon Hill

Simon Hill

Contributor

@IamSimonHill

Simon Hill is a freelance technology journalist with a decade of writing experience covering everything from smartphones to smart home gadgets. For the last few years, he served as Associate Editor at Digital Trends where he wrote features, reviews, analysis, how-tos, and more.

See all of Simon Hill's reviews

Checking our work.

We use standardized and scientific testing methods to scrutinize every product and provide you with objectively accurate results. If you’ve found different results in your own research, email us and we’ll compare notes. If it looks substantial, we’ll gladly re-test a product to try and reproduce these results. After all, peer reviews are a critical part of any scientific process.

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