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The Best Electric and Induction Cooktops Credit: Getty Images

The Best Electric and Induction Cooktops of 2022

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The Best Electric and Induction Cooktops Credit: Getty Images

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Editor's Choice Product image of KitchenAid KICU509XBL
Best Induction Cooktop

KitchenAid KICU509XBL

Performing just as well as other induction cooktops, the KitchenAid KICU509XBL features a bridge burner and surprisingly excellent touch controls. Read More

Pros

  • Can boil water in two minutes
  • Gentle and stable low temperatures
  • Incredibly hot high temperatures

Cons

  • None that we could find
Product image of GE PHP9036DJBB

GE PHP9036DJBB

This easy-to-use cooktop comes with five different heating elements that heat up your pots and pens quickly and precisely. Read More

Pros

  • Heats up cookware quickly
  • Easy to operate
  • Cool to the touch around elements

Cons

  • Expensive
Product image of Frigidaire Gallery FGIC3666TB

Frigidaire Gallery FGIC3666TB

This cooktop can boil water quickly, control the temperature on your cookware, and reviewers say it’s easy to install and use. Read More

Pros

  • Fast boiling feature
  • Easy to install and use
  • Affordable

Cons

  • None that we can find
Product image of GE Profile PP9030SJSS

GE Profile PP9030SJSS

This cooktop comes with a “melt” setting, a keep-warm option, a hot-surface signal, a timer, and a high-tech fast-boiling feature. Read More

Pros

  • Hot surface signal
  • Easy-to-use glide touch controls
  • Control-lock safety feature

Cons

  • Expensive
Product image of Hestan Cue Countertop Induction Cooktop

Hestan Cue Countertop Induction Cooktop

This system offers more than 500 recipes, and there are 12 different cooking functions to choose from, including slow cooking, candy making, and more. Read More

Pros

  • Easy to clean and use
  • Heats up quickly
  • Compact size

Cons

  • None that we could find

Many pros might swear by gas, but electric—and especially induction—affords a host of advantages that simply can't be denied. Impressively wide temperature ranges and even heating are just a couple of these.

Whether you're looking to melt chocolate for a tasty dessert or sear the heck out of a sous vide steak, these cooktops can get it done. And rest assured, we've looked into enough models to know exactly what separates the best from the rest.

Editor's Note

The recommendations in this guide are based on thorough product and market research by our team of expert product reviewers. The picks are based on examining user reviews, product specifications, and, in some limited cases, our experience with the specific products named.

KitchenAid KICU509XBL
Credit: KitchenAid
Best Induction Cooktop
KitchenAid KICU509XBL

The KitchenAid KICU509XBL Architect Series II series cooktop is yet another great argument in favor of induction cooking. It performs as well as other induction cooktops we've tested, and offers cool features like a bridge burner and surprisingly excellent touch controls. The cooktop itself delivers low, even heat that'll melt chocolate without scorching, and blazing heat that boils water in 2 minutes. Without a doubt, this cooktop is worth every penny. Read full review.

Pros

  • Can boil water in two minutes

  • Gentle and stable low temperatures

  • Incredibly hot high temperatures

Cons

  • None that we could find

Product image of GE PHP9036DJBB
GE PHP9036DJBB

This easy-to-use induction cooktop comes with five different heating elements that heat up your pots and pens quickly and precisely. Plus, many customers say it’s easy to operate, and have been amazed at how quickly they can cook their food, thanks to the 3,700-watt induction element. You can even control two seven-inch elements at the same time for even heating on both elements. What’s better: this cooktop has a hot-surface warning feature, a pan sensor, and is easy to clean and operate.

Pros

  • Heats up cookware quickly

  • Easy to operate

  • Cool to the touch around elements

Cons

  • Expensive

Product image of GE Profile PP9030SJSS
GE Profile PP9030SJSS

This glass ceramic electric cooktop has five versatile elements. It has one to keep your food warm and two that offer different pan-size options on a single surface element. It also has a feature that allows you to heat two seven-inch elements together for equal heating. This cooktop comes with a “melt” setting, a keep-warm option, a hot-surface signal, a timer, and a high-tech fast-boiling feature.

Pros

  • Hot surface signal

  • Easy-to-use glide touch controls

  • Control-lock safety feature

Cons

  • Expensive

Product image of Hestan Cue Countertop Induction Cooktop
Hestan Cue Countertop Induction Cooktop

The Hestan Cue is the next best thing to having an in-home cooking lesson. This smart cookware system uses an induction cooktop and high-quality stainless steel pan to quite literally walk you through different recipes, helping you achieve precise results every time.

When used with the Cue app, the cooktop will automatically adjust its temperature as you add ingredients and tell you when to move on to the next step. The system offers more than 500 recipes, and there are 12 different cooking functions to choose from, including slow cooking, sauce making, rice cooking, frying, candy making, and more.

Pros

  • Easy to clean and use

  • Heats up quickly

  • Compact size

Cons

  • None that we could find

What You Should Know Before Buying An Electric Or Induction Cooktop

What Is Induction Cooking?

Although they resemble smoothtop electric burners, induction cooktops don't have actual burners underneath their surface. Induction cooking uses electromagnetic energy to heat pots and pans directly. In comparison, gas and electric cooktops heat indirectly, using flames or a heating element to pass radiant energy through your cookware to your food.

Induction cooktops can achieve a wider range of temperatures than other cooking methods, and they take far less time to boil than their electric or gas counterparts. In addition, the cooktop surface itself stays cool, so you don't have to worry about burning your hand. It's even possible to wipe down the surface during cooking. Just remember, the cooktop doesn't get hot, but the pan does.

What Cookware Works With Induction?

Because induction relies on electromagnetism, only pots with magnetic bottoms—steel and iron—can transfer heat. The winners of our best stainless steel skillets roundup are induction-friendly. But that doesn’t mean you need to buy all-new cookware. If a magnet sticks to the bottom, your pots and pans will work with induction.

Meet the testers

James Aitchison

James Aitchison

Staff Writer

@revieweddotcom

Aside from reviewing ovens and cooktops, James moonlights as an educational theatre practitioner, amateur home chef, and weekend DIY warrior.

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Lindsay D. Mattison

Lindsay D. Mattison

Professional Chef

@zestandtang

Lindsay D. Mattison is a professional chef, food writer, and amateur gardener. She is currently writing a cookbook that aims to teach home cooks how to write without a recipe.

See all of Lindsay D. Mattison's reviews
Camryn Rabideau

Camryn Rabideau

Contributor

@CamrynWrites

Camryn Rabideau is a full-time freelance writer and product tester with eight years of experience. She's been lucky enough to test hundreds of products firsthand, and her specialties include bedding and pet products, which often require help from her two dogs, three cats, and flock of rambunctious chickens.

See all of Camryn Rabideau's reviews
Lily Hartman

Lily Hartman

Staff Writer, Search

Lily Hartman is a staff writer at Reviewed. In her free time, she enjoys hiking the White Mountains, running at the beach, and strength training at the gym.

See all of Lily Hartman's reviews

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