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A close-up photo of an electric range highlighting the electric cooktop and the oven control knobs. Credit: Reviewed

The Best Electric Ranges of 2022

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A close-up photo of an electric range highlighting the electric cooktop and the oven control knobs. Credit: Reviewed

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Editor's Choice Product image of Whirlpool WGE745C0FS
Best Overall

Whirlpool WGE745C0FS

This double oven electric range is the best we've tested because of its effective burners, spacious ovens that evenly bake food, and sleek look. Read More

Pros

  • Effective burners
  • Large oven capacity and spacious cooktop
  • Bakes evenly across a single tray

Cons

  • Lower oven doesn't bake cookies evenly between two trays
Editor's Choice Product image of Bosch HEI8054U
Best Upgrade

Bosch HEI8054U

Currently
Unavailable

If you need a versatile electric range with solid burners and many cooking options, the Bosch HEI8054U is a good fit. Read More

Pros

  • Many cooking options
  • Performs well
  • Versatile burners

Cons

  • Slow boiling times
  • Uneven baking
Editor's Choice Product image of LG LREL6325F

LG LREL6325F

This electric range has useful smart features like Air Fry, plus its even baking and quick boiling make it one of the best we’ve tested. Read More

Pros

  • Even baking
  • Short boil times
  • Has True Convection
  • Useful smart features like Air Fry and InstaView

Cons

  • Slow preheat
  • Air Fry tray sold separately
Product image of Frigidaire Professional PCFE3078AF

Frigidaire Professional PCFE3078AF

This gorgeous slide-in range is great for baking enthusiasts, and has a built-in oven probe to help you monitor the food. Read More

Pros

  • Built-in probe thermometer
  • Bakes evenly

Cons

  • Slow to heat up
  • Air fry feature could use improvements
Editor's Choice Product image of Samsung NE59J7850WS

Samsung NE59J7850WS

The Samsung NE59J7850WS allows you to divide the 5.9-cu.-ft. oven cavity in two on demand. The range top easily reaches searing heats and simmering lows. Read More

Pros

  • Cooktop heats very well
  • Adjustable dual oven

Cons

  • Uneven baking

Gas may be the pros' choice, and induction may be the (magnetic) wave of the future, but there's still plenty to be said for cooking with radiant electric heat. Electric ranges can provide an impressively wide temperature range, consistently excellent convection, and even heating across the board—great things to have if you enjoy cooking.

While the decision of which fuel to cook with might be out of your hands thanks to your choice of home, you still have plenty of options when it comes to the specific model. There are dozens of options to choose from, but lucky for you, we've put enough of these electric ranges through their paces to make some strong recommendations, including the best overall Whirlpool WGE745C0FS (available at Best Buy for $1,619.99) and best upgrade Bosch HEI8054U (available at AppliancesConnection).

Here are the best electric ranges we tested ranked, in order:

  1. Whirlpool WGE745C0FS
  2. Bosch HEI8054U
  3. LG LREL6325F
  4. Frigidaire PCFE3078AF
  5. Samsung NE59J7850WS
  6. Samsung NE59M6850SS
  7. LG Studio LSSE3027ST
  8. Frigidaire Professional FPEF3077QF
  9. Kenmore Elite 95223
  10. Frigidaire FGEH3047VF
  11. GE JB655SKSS
  12. Haier QSS740BNTS
  13. GE JS645SLSS

A lifestyle image of a modern home kitchen featuring a stainless steel double oven electric range framed by white cabinets.
Credit: Whirlpool

The Whirlpool WGE745C0FS is the best electric range we've tested.

Best Overall
Whirlpool WGE745C0FS

The Whirlpool WGE745C0FS electric range is a knockout across the board. It passed every test we threw at it with flying colors, from boiling water to baking pizza. Its ability to multitask sets it apart from other ranges, in particular having the option to bake two dishes at different temperatures simultaneously and fit at least four pots on the cooktop at once.

This range is chock-full of features, including Frozen Bake, Rapid Preheat, and Sabbath Mode. You won’t find an air fry setting, but fret not; the True Convection mode will produce the same deliciously crispy results. It's available in stainless steel, black, and white finishes, so it’s designed to match most kitchens. Regardless of the finish, we like the look of this range in particular because of the ultra-sleek smooth cooktop.

The only small downside we could find to this range was the uneven doneness of cookies when we tested True Convection mode in the bottom oven. That said, this is still the best electric range we’ve tested.

Pros

  • Effective burners

  • Large oven capacity and spacious cooktop

  • Bakes evenly across a single tray

Cons

  • Lower oven doesn't bake cookies evenly between two trays

A photo of a sleek, modern electric range.
Credit: Bosch

The Bosch HEI8054U is our upgrade pick as it's one of the best ranges we've tested.

Best Upgrade
Bosch HEI8054U

The 30-inch Bosch HEI8054U all-stainless electric range feels sturdy, looks great, comes with a ton of extra features and options, and performed well in our cooking and heating tests. While it takes a bit longer than usual to boil 6 cups of water, the cooktop burners are very versatile temperature-wise; they can reach temperatures between 110°F and 800°F.

We didn't get a chance to test out the numerous extra oven options including Bake, Variable Broil, Roast, Warm, Proof Dough, Convection Bake, Convection Broil, Convection Roast, Multi-Rack European-style Convection with conversion, Pizza, and Fast Preheat. However, our tests showed that this oven does a great job cooking meat all the way through, but may be a bit uneven in its heat application when it comes to cookies. If you need a versatile electric range with solid burners and many cooking options, the Bosch HEI8054U is a good fit.

Pros

  • Many cooking options

  • Performs well

  • Versatile burners

Cons

  • Slow boiling times

  • Uneven baking

How We Tested Electric Ranges

The Testers

Hi there! We're Madison Trapkin and Valerie Li, Reviewed's kitchen and cooking team. As passionate food and beverage aficionados who have covered topics like meal kits, pressure cookers, microwaves, and sous-vide immersion circulators,we know what it takes to make a great kitchen appliance. Whether you’re finally replacing an old range or have always wanted to add a wall oven while renovating your kitchen, we've got your back.

The Tests

Not only do we perform repeatable, lab-based tests on ovens, ranges, and cooktops, but we also do real-world evaluations (think: cookie baking, pizza cooking, and the like). That means we can tell you which products will perform the best, will give you the most bang for your buck, or have the sleekest looks.

Burner Temperature

For products with burners, we measure the maximum and minimum temperature of each burner to help consumers identify which burners are ideal for simmering soup, and which burner can get hot enough to properly sear a steak.

A range or cooktop with multiple burners that can reach very high and/or very low temperatures will score well. If burners cannot reach very high or low temperatures—or if only one burner can do each task—scores will be lower.

Time To Boil Water

We know watching water boil is a bore, so we judge cooktops on how quickly they can actually boil a pot of water. Shorter boil times lead to higher scores.
Credit: Reviewed / Julia MacDougall

We know watching water boil is a bore, so we judge cooktops on how quickly they can actually boil a pot of water. Shorter boil times lead to higher scores.

One of the most common tasks for a range or cooktop is to boil a pot of water. For each burner, we take an appropriately sized pot, and fill it up halfway with distilled water. Then, we position a thermometer horizontally in the middle of the pot, and vertically in the middle of the water column. We monitor the thermocouple and record the time it takes for the temperature of the water to reach 212°F.

If the water hasn’t reached 212°F after 35 minutes, then we stop the test. Because the water volume is different for varying burner sizes, we score the water boil test on the rate of water boiling: Faster water boiling will result in higher scores, while slower water boiling will result in lower scores.

Time To Preheat

Using a stopwatch, we measure how long it takes for the oven to achieve a preheating temperature of 350°F. We stop the clock when the oven’s preheat indicator beeps.

Because no one wants to wait around forever, shorter preheating times result in higher scores, while longer preheating times result in lower scores.

How Evenly The Oven Bakes

We bake cookies in both standard bake and convection mode (if available) to see how evenly the oven can bake the cookies.
Credit: Reviewed / Julia MacDougall

We bake cookies in both standard bake and convection mode (if available) to see how evenly the oven can bake the cookies.

One happy side effect of testing ovens is that there are always extra cookies lying around. In addition to being delicious, cookies double as a cooking/baking proxy for other thin food items, such as brownies or vegetables.

We place 12 Pillsbury ready-to-bake sugar cookie chunks on an ungreased cookie sheet in a grid formation. After preheating the oven to 350°F for 15 minutes, we place the cookie sheet in the oven on the rack recommended by the manufacturer (or, if there is no recommendation, the middle rack) to bake for 15 minutes. We remove the cookies from the oven, and allow them to cool for 2 minutes.

We repeat the process if there’s a second oven, or if the range or oven comes with a convection option. Because convection is commonly used to bake or cook multiple food items simultaneously, we place two trays of cookies on the two racks recommended by the manufacturer.

After looking the cookies over, we determine how evenly baked they are, both within a single baking sheet (regular baking mode and second oven baking mode) and between multiple baking sheets (convection bake mode). Because convection is generally a more efficient way of cooking or baking something, it is important that the multiple food items on different racks be cooked or baked to the same degree.

For all of our cookie tests, the more evenly baked the cookies are, the higher the score will be. If the product has a second oven and/or convection capabilities, then the cookie scores for those tests and the main oven test are weighted and combined to arrive at a final cookie score. This way, products with just a single, conventional oven are not penalized for their lack of a second oven or convection capabilities.

How Well The Oven Cooks Meat

When it comes to cooking meat, we want to be sure that each oven is capable of cooking meat evenly and to safe eating standards (160°F).
Credit: Reviewed / Julia MacDougall

When it comes to cooking meat, we want to be sure that each oven is capable of cooking meat evenly and to safe eating standards (160°F).

To understand how each product cooks meat products, we also use fresh, never-frozen pork loins in our testing because they are exceptionally uniform as far as all-natural products go.

After placing the 3- to 4-pound boneless pork loin in a roasting pan, we place a temperature probe in the middle of the pork loin. We preheat the oven to 325°F, placed the pork on the rack recommended by the manufacturer, and cook until the internal temperature probe reads 160°F, which is the minimum safe temperature for cooking most meat products.

We then remove the pork loin, let it sit for 10 minutes, and cut it into thirds so we can see how evenly cooked it is. An identical test is conducted if the oven has convection capabilities, using the Convection Roast option if available, or the standard convection mode if not.

How Effectively The Oven Cooks Pizza

Can this oven get hot enough to cook a pizza? We put each oven to the test with a very basic pizza that has a temperature probe in it.
Credit: Reviewed / Julia MacDougall

Can this oven get hot enough to cook a pizza? We put each oven to the test with a very basic pizza that has a temperature probe in it.

One of the most common reader questions we get is whether a specific oven can get hot enough to actually cook a pizza. To answer this question, we place a batch of Pillsbury Classic pizza dough on a lightly oiled baking sheet, put a temperature probe in the dough, cover it with tomato sauce and cheese, and bake it at 500°F for 10 minutes. Between the temperature data and our own subjective assessment, we determine whether the oven is capable of cooking a pizza all the way through or not.

Overall Experience

While we go to great lengths to test the cooking/baking abilities of these cooking appliances, we also incorporate more subjective information into our overall assessment. For example, how easily can the cooktop surface accommodate multiple pots and pans? How easy is it to understand the control panel? How nice are the burner knobs or buttons? How loud is the preheat notification noise? We answer all of these questions and more to determine if there are any major drawbacks to the product that might not make it a good fit for most households.


What You Should Know Before Buying An Electric Range

What Is The Difference Between Convection And True Convection?

True Convection is an oven setting that includes installing an extra heating element and a fan in the oven. By adding an additional heating unit and fan that circulates the hot air, True Convection is great for ensuring that cookies or cakes baked on different racks will bake through at the same rate, rather than the cookies closest to the bottom heat source cooking faster than those on the rack higher up. If you don't see mention of "True Convection" or "European Convection", but do see the word "convection" in a range's specs, it means that the unit lacks an additional heating element, but does have a fan to circulate the hot air. While you don't get the full baking and cooking effect that you would with True Convection, the added heat circulation can cook or bake food more evenly than it would without a fan.

There are also ranges out there that do not offer convection options at all; these ovens aren't bad, it will just take more time to cook and bake food all the way through. If you're a frequent baker or cook, convection can be a great time saver, but your dinners won't suffer unduly without it.

What Is The Difference Between Slide-in And Freestanding Ranges?

In a nutshell, slide-in ranges are meant to sit flush with your countertops, while freestanding ranges are meant to sit on top of any surface. While slotting in and sitting on top of your countertop may seem similar, the main differences between the two involve finish and ease of cleaning. Because freestanding ranges are visible from all slides, they have a more finished look; slide-in ranges are meant to have their sides hidden by the cabinetry, so the finish typically isn't as pretty on the sides.

Additionally, because slide-in ranges sit flush with your countertop, they're a bit easier to clean because they do not have a large lip around the edge. Freestanding ranges often have larger lips around the edge of the cooktop to corral any crumbs that would otherwise decorate your floor. Freestanding ranges also typically have a back-mounted control panel for the same reason.

While slide-in ranges will do fine in a freestanding arrangement, the reverse is less true. If your current cooking setup has the range sitting in a cabinet or countertop cutout, we recommend replacing that range with another slide-in range. Conversely, if your range stands alone in your kitchen, we'd recommend replacing it with another freestanding range to cut down on food debris spilling everywhere.

Should I Get A Front-mounted Control Panel Or Back-mounted Control Panel?

As we mentioned earlier, most freestanding ranges have back-mounted controls, but some slide-in ranges do as well. Both arrangements have pros and cons; on the one hand, having back-mounted controls means you may have to reach over hot food to adjust the oven temperature, the controls are also far enough away that you would have difficulty hitting something on the control panel by accident. On the other hand, front-mounted controls are easier to reach, but that convenience can turn against you if you brush up against a knob accidentally. Consider the ergonomics of using the range when it comes to picking a front- or back-mounted control panel.

How Many Burners Do I Need?

Depending on how much time you spend in the kitchen, it might be worth it to investigate in some extra options for your range. When it comes to the cooktop, anything above the standard four-burner setup is a bonus. Some ranges can have five, or even six burners; however, the more burners a range has, the more difficult it becomes to fit large pieces of cookware, such as a spaghetti pot and a frying pan, on their respective burners at the same time.

Sometimes, those extra burners are specialty burners are designed to accommodate special cookware such as a griddle or a wok; other burners are bridge burners that are meant to keep food warm without continuing to cook it.

Another possibility is to have a dual-ring burner, or a burner that includes a stronger heat source wrapped around a weaker heat source. That way, on a single burner, you can choose to use just the smaller heat source for lower temperatures, but you can add the stronger heat source if you need higher temperatures.

What Oven Features Do I Need?

As for extra oven features, they can include everything from accessories like special oven racks or a temperature probe to special cooking features like the aforementioned convection settings, fast preheat (which expedites the preheating process), bread proofing (where the oven settings are customized to activate yeast and make bread rise), steam cooking (where you pour water into a reservoir and gently cook something with the resulting steam), air fry mode (where you can expeditiously fry frozen and fresh foods, similar to an air fryer) and many, many more options.


Other Electric Ranges We Tested

Product image of LG LREL6325F
LG LREL6325F

The LG LREL6325F Freestanding Electric Range was our former top-performing electric range. Its cooktop is sleek and easy to clean, and the average boil times for its five burners (two of which are dual-zone) are the fastest of any electric range we've tested.

This oven baked cookies, pork, and pizza evenly, plus it’s got a built-in Air Fry feature that produced perfectly crispy French fries when we tested. This smart range is Wi-Fi–capable and is compatible with LG’s ThinQ smartphone app, which allows users to control their range using Google Assistant or Amazon Alexa.

Pros

  • Even baking

  • Short boil times

  • Has True Convection

  • Useful smart features like Air Fry and InstaView

Cons

  • Slow preheat

  • Air Fry tray sold separately

Product image of Frigidaire Professional PCFE3078AF
Frigidaire Professional PCFE3078AF

The Frigidaire Professional PCFE3078AF Electric Range has the bells and whistles you expect to see in high-end appliances. It's one of the top-performing ranges we've tested and has many bonus features, such as the true-convection oven that can also air fry. The smooth, glass cooktop surface makes cleaning a breeze. Performance-wise, this range received perfect scores in our oven tests, from roasting pork chops to baking multiple trays of cookies.

This gorgeous slide-in range is great for baking enthusiasts and has a built-in oven probe to help you monitor the food. However, it took a while to preheat, and bring a pot of water to a boil. Those basics aside, serious bakers will likely find a lot to like with this appliance.

Pros

  • Built-in probe thermometer

  • Bakes evenly

Cons

  • Slow to heat up

  • Air fry feature could use improvements

Product image of Samsung NE59J7850WS
Samsung NE59J7850WS

Unlike a typical dual-oven range, the Samsung NE59J7850WS allows you to divide the 5.9-cubic-foot oven cavity in two on-demand, offering a new level of adaptability. You can also bisect the door, but only when and if you choose. Along with the oven(s), the rangetop easily reaches searing heats or simmering lows. Whether you want to cook a Thanksgiving turkey or cook multiple meals at once, this range can fit your needs.

Pros

  • Cooktop heats very well

  • Adjustable dual oven

Cons

  • Uneven baking

Product image of Samsung NE59M6850SS
Samsung NE59M6850SS

We love the Samsung NE59M6850SS/AA electric range with convection. Its Flex Duo divider means it's three ovens in one package: It can function as a large, single oven, or you can simply slide in the divider to convert it into two smaller ovens for baking two things at once. This model also offers Wi-Fi for remote preheat, two powerful burners, great low-heat simmering, and some of the best roasting we've ever tested.

Pros

  • Roasts food well

  • Fast boiling

Cons

  • Uneven baking

Product image of LG LSSE3027ST
LG LSSE3027ST

The LG Studio LSSE3027ST Electric Range is a fine range in terms of performance, but it’s not the best or cheapest LG electric range we’ve tested. The average boil time across its five burners (two dual-zone, three single-zone) was faster than our top-performing electric range, the Electrolux EI30EF45QS. We like that it has useful features like ProBake Convection, Remote Start, plus the option to use the ThinQ smartphone app.

Pros

  • Short boil times

  • Useful smart features

  • Large oven capacity

Cons

  • Uneven baking

  • Slow preheat

Product image of Frigidaire Professional FPEF3077QF
Frigidaire Professional FPEF3077QF

The Frigidaire FPEF3077QF Professional electric range has the genuine and classic look of a high-end oven at a substantially lower price. But it's quite capable in the cooking department too: The 6.1-cubic-foot oven offers rapid preheat speeds and excellent overall cooking evenness. Whatever it may lack in ability, it makes up for in versatility.

Pros

  • Burner versatility

  • Plenty of convection settings

Cons

  • Boiling takes a while on cooktop

Product image of Kenmore Elite 95223
Kenmore Elite 95223

This upgraded Kenmore model really doesn’t disappoint. It has a ton of value-added features, like a triple burner, a warming drawer with five different heat settings, and a luxury-glide oven rack. Add that to the ability to bake on convection and steam baking settings and you really have a great package.

It might be a little slow to preheat, but once it gets up to temperature it bakes and roasts really nicely, scoring on the top end of our baking tests. The burners not only heat up to high temperatures but they can also simmer at nice low ones. Overall, you could do much worse than this Kenmore model.

Pros

  • Great min and max temperatures

  • Lots of great features

Cons

  • Slow to preheat

Product image of GE JB655SKSS
GE JB655SKSS

There’s a reason why GE is the most popular brand for cooking appliances in the U.S.: It makes a solid product. The GE JB655SKSS is no exception. It does an excellent job at roasting and broiling, but may not be the best bet for serious bakers: Our cakes came out pretty uneven. On average, it takes the burners about 9-10 minutes to boil 6 cups of water, but the right-front burner was able to boil that amount of water in under 4 minutes, which is pretty speedy. Overall, this range is a good deal for what it does and consumers agree.

Pros

  • Decent cooktop performance

  • Great at roasting and broiling

Cons

  • Poor cooktop control layout

  • Uneven baking temperatures

Product image of Haier QSS740BNTS
Haier QSS740BNTS
Editor's Note: December 9, 2021

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has issued a recall of the Haier QSS740BNTS electric range due to a tip-over hazard. Affected customers should contact GE for repairs. You can find more information about the recall here and check your individual model and serial numbers here.

The Haier QSS740BNTS certainly has plenty of features that will delight tech nerds everywhere, assuming you don’t mind using an app to cook, as many of this range's functions (including temperature control and a timer) are only accessible via the SmartHQ app. But serious home cooks might want to go with a higher-performing model as this range struggled to bake cookies evenly, cook pizza all the way through, and perfectly brown pork.

Pros

  • Attractive design

  • Includes built-in meat probe

  • Remote preheat

Cons

  • Uneven baking

  • Can’t use many features without app

Product image of GE JS645SLSS
GE JS645SLSS

The GE JS645SLSS Electric Range is easy on the eyes and it faired well on most of our tests, baking cookies particularly evenly. But this 30-inch slide-in range is missing convection, so you can forget about achieving air fryer-like crispiness. This function is super basic and there’s really no reason an oven shouldn’t have it, especially one that’s over $1,000.

Pros

  • Sleek design

  • Even baking

Cons

  • No convection

  • Slow boil times

Meet the testers

Madison Trapkin

Madison Trapkin

Kitchen & Cooking Editor

Madison Trapkin is the kitchen & cooking editor at Reviewed. Formerly the editor-in-chief of Culture Magazine, Madison is the founder of GRLSQUASH, a women's food, art, and culture journal. Her work has also appeared in The Boston Globe, Cherrybombe, Gather Journal, and more. She is passionate about pizza, aesthetic countertop appliances, and regularly watering her houseplants.

She holds a Bachelor's degree from the University of Georgia and a Master's of Liberal Arts in Gastronomy from Boston University.

See all of Madison Trapkin's reviews
Lindsay D. Mattison

Lindsay D. Mattison

Professional Chef

@zestandtang

Lindsay D. Mattison is a professional chef, food writer, and amateur gardener. She is currently writing a cookbook that aims to teach home cooks how to write without a recipe.

See all of Lindsay D. Mattison's reviews
James Aitchison

James Aitchison

Staff Writer

@revieweddotcom

Aside from reviewing ovens and cooktops, James moonlights as an educational theatre practitioner, amateur home chef, and weekend DIY warrior.

See all of James Aitchison's reviews

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