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The Best 36-inch Dual-Fuel Ranges of 2022

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Editor's Choice Product image of KitchenAid KSDB900ESS
Best Dual Fuel

KitchenAid KSDB900ESS

If you need fine control for your burners and mostly even baking in the oven, look no further than the KitchenAid KSDB900ESS dual-fuel range. Read More

Pros

  • 7 cu. ft. combined oven capacity
  • Has a steam rack
  • AquaLift self-clean technology

Cons

  • Some baking performance may be uneven
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Product image of KitchenAid KFGC506JSS

KitchenAid KFGC506JSS

This high-tech, dual-fuel range can be controlled remotely using Wi-Fi, so you can do some cooking prep before you even get home. Read More

Pros

  • Custom LED accent light
  • Easy to clean
  • Remote Wi-Fi controls

Cons

  • None that we could find
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Product image of Monogram ZGP366NTSS

Monogram ZGP366NTSS

This dual-fuel range is compatible with devices such as Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa—making it easy to multitask from various locations at home. Read More

Pros

  • Custom LED accent light
  • 6 brass burners included

Cons

  • Expensive
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Product image of ZLINE Kitchen & Bath RA36

ZLINE Kitchen & Bath RA36

Overall, this dual-fuel range seems to be worth it if you want one without having to spend thousands of dollars. Read More

Pros

  • Easy to clean
  • Attractive design
  • Affordable

Cons

  • Takes a while to heat up
5
Product image of Cosmo COS-F965NF

Cosmo COS-F965NF

This dual-fuel range comes with five burners, eight cooking functions, a spacious convection oven, and a protective cooling system. Read More

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Oven is spacious
  • Safety cooling system

Cons

  • None that we could find

Serious home cooks like dual-fuel ranges because they combine the best of both worlds: Gas burners for superior control, and an electric oven for even baking.

That’s why high-end appliance companies—like Thermador, Wolf, Miele, and Monogram—specialize in dual-fuel ranges with pro-style looks. For an upscale remodeling project, most designers recommend at least a 36-inch model because they’re large enough to fit at least five pots and pans with room to spare, and offer enough oven space to prep for a dinner party.

At Reviewed, we checked out 10 of the top-rated dual-fuel ranges on the market. Armed with that knowledge, we can recommend our favorite 36-inch dual-fuel ranges, the Thermador Pro Harmony PRD364GDHU. (available at Best Buy for $3,059.99)

Editor's Note

The recommendations in this guide are based on thorough product and market research by our team of expert product reviewers. The picks are based on examining user reviews, product specifications, and, in some limited cases, our experience with the specific products named.

The KitchenAid KSDB900ESS dual-fuel range.
Credit: KitchenAid

The KitchenAid KSDB900ESS dual-fuel range.

Best Dual Fuel
KitchenAid KSDB900ESS

The KitchenAid KSDB900ESS dual-fuel slide-in range has a sleek pro-style aesthetic, with shiny knobs to control the gas burners and a full touch panel to control the electric oven. Between the oven and the baking drawer (which has three modes: bake, slow bake, and keep warm), the combined oven capacity is 7 cu. ft.; plenty for those large dinner parties or food-heavy holidays. Other nice touches include a steam rack for steam baking, a wireless meat probe, and AquaLift self-clean technology.

While some of out test cookies came out a bit unevenly baked, the cakes came out perfectly and evenly browned. On their lowest setting, the gas burners came in at an astonishingly low 95°F-100°F, some of the lowest temperatures we've recorded that still kept the pilot light lit. If you need fine control for your burners and mostly even baking in the oven, look no further than the KitchenAid KSDB900ESS dual-fuel range.

Pros

  • 7 cu. ft. combined oven capacity

  • Has a steam rack

  • AquaLift self-clean technology

Cons

  • Some baking performance may be uneven

Product image of KitchenAid KFGC506JSS
KitchenAid KFGC506JSS

This high-tech, dual-fuel range can be controlled remotely using Wi-Fi, so you can do some cooking prep—like preheating the oven and setting the timer—before you even get home. It has a wide spectrum of heat settings to accommodate your cooking needs: a gentle flame to melt some butter or an intense one for boiling water. It’s easy to clean, both inside and out, and comes with an LCD display that shows the probe temperature as well as how much time you have left on whatever’s baking. What’s better: there’s even an LED accent light that can be customized to the lightning in your home.

Pros

  • Custom LED accent light

  • Easy to clean

  • Remote Wi-Fi controls

Cons

  • None that we could find

Product image of Monogram ZGP366NTSS
Monogram ZGP366NTSS

This dual-fuel range is compatible with devices such as Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa—making it easy to multitask from various locations in your home. In addition, this range comes with six brass burners that can be adjusted from a very low flame all the way to high temperatures in a flash.

As for the convection oven, it’s built to perfectly cook your food due to the way it evenly circulates the air inside. It has a large window so you can watch things cooking in real time, as well as a probe that reads the internal temperature of your food.

Pros

  • Custom LED accent light

  • 6 brass burners included

Cons

  • Expensive

Product image of ZLINE Kitchen & Bath RA36
ZLINE Kitchen & Bath RA36

What’s great about this dual-fuel range is that it comes with an LP conversion kit, which allows you to have a professional switch your dual-fuel range from natural gas to liquid propane, if that is what you prefer. The cooktop comes with six powerful burners, which customers say are easy to clean. As for the oven, it can fit dishes as wide as 27 inches and is built with racks that glide smoothly when you’re loading and unloading pans. As for the way this dual-fuel range distributes heat, some say that it’s not super even (one reviewer shared a photo of a pizza that was crispier on one side as evidence). Overall, this dual-fuel range seems to be worth it if you want one without having to spend thousands of dollars.

Pros

  • Easy to clean

  • Attractive design

  • Affordable

Cons

  • Takes a while to heat up

Product image of Cosmo COS-F965NF
Cosmo COS-F965NF

Given how affordable this dual-fuel range is, you may be surprised to hear how impressive its features are. There are tons of reviews on how attractive the range is, along with ones praising the general quality. Of course, you aren’t going to get as many features as one in the higher thousands, but this is a great standard, reliable option. It comes with five burners, eight cooking functions, a spacious convection oven, and a cooling system that protects your range from overheating. This one also has the option to switch from natural gas to liquid propane, but the conversion kit is sold separately.

Pros

  • Affordable

  • Oven is spacious

  • Safety cooling system

Cons

  • None that we could find

What You Should Know Before Buying A Dual Fuel Range

What Is A Dual Fuel Range?

Dual fuel ranges combine the power of an induction cooktop with the even baking of a gas oven.

What Are The Different Types Of Range Fuels?

One of the main ways to differentiate ranges is by their fuel type: gas, electric, dual-fuel, and induction.

Gas — Lower cooktop temperatures, faster water boiling, potential for uneven cooking/baking because of central flame location

Electric — Higher cooktop temperatures, slower water boiling, more even cooking/baking because of heat distribution over coil

Dual-fuel — Faster water boiling, more even cooking/baking because of heat distribution over coil

Induction — Super faster water boiling, very high and low cooktop temperatures, requires special cookware, may require recipe modification

Depending on your cooking and baking priorities, as well as the way you learned to cook, one of these fuel types might be more appealing than the rest. One more thing to consider: dual-fuel and induction ranges are typically more expensive than gas and electric ranges.

What Is The Difference Between Convection And True Convection?

True Convection is an oven setting that includes installing an extra heating element and a fan in the oven. By adding an additional heating unit and fan that circulates the hot air, True Convection is great for ensuring that cookies or cakes baked on different racks will bake through at the same rate, rather than the cookies closest to the bottom heat source cooking faster than those on the rack higher up. If you don't see mention of "True Convection" or "European Convection", but do see the word "convection" in a range's specs, it means that the unit lacks an additional heating element, but does have a fan to circulate the hot air. While you don't get the full baking and cooking effect that you would with True Convection, the added heat circulation can cook or bake food more evenly than it would without a fan.

There are also ranges out there that do not offer convection options at all; these ovens aren't bad, it will just take more time to cook and bake food all the way through. If you're a frequent baker or cook, convection can be a great time saver, but your dinners won't suffer unduly without it.

What Is The Difference Between Slide-in And Freestanding Ranges?

In a nutshell, slide-in ranges are meant to sit flush with your countertops, while freestanding ranges are meant to sit on top of any surface. While slotting in and sitting on top of your countertop may seem similar, the main differences between the two involve finish and ease of cleaning. Because freestanding ranges are visible from all slides, they have a more finished look; slide-in ranges are meant to have their sides hidden by the cabinetry, so the finish typically isn't as pretty on the sides.

Additionally, because slide-in ranges sit flush with your countertop, they're a bit easier to clean because they do not have a large lip around the edge. Freestanding ranges often have larger lips around the edge of the cooktop to corral any crumbs that would otherwise decorate your floor. Freestanding ranges also typically have a back-mounted control panel for the same reason.

While slide-in ranges will do fine in a freestanding arrangement, the reverse is less true. If your current cooking setup has the range sitting in a cabinet or countertop cutout, we recommend replacing that range with another slide-in range. Conversely, if your range stands alone in your kitchen, we'd recommend replacing it with another freestanding range to cut down on food debris spilling everywhere.

Should I Get A Front-mounted Control Panel Or Back-mounted Control Panel?

As we mentioned earlier, most freestanding ranges have back-mounted controls, but some slide-in ranges do as well. Both arrangements have pros and cons; on the one hand, having back-mounted controls means you may have to reach over hot food to adjust the oven temperature, the controls are also far enough away that you would have difficulty hitting something on the control panel by accident. On the other hand, front-mounted controls are easier to reach, but that convenience can turn against you if you brush up against a knob accidentally. Consider the ergonomics of using the range when it comes to picking a front- or back-mounted control panel.

How Many Burners Do I Need?

Depending on how much time you spend in the kitchen, it might be worth it to investigate in some extra options for your range. When it comes to the cooktop, anything above the standard four-burner setup is a bonus. Some ranges can have five, or even six burners; however, the more burners a range has, the more difficult it becomes to fit large pieces of cookware, such as a spaghetti pot and a frying pan, on their respective burners at the same time.

Sometimes, those extra burners are specialty burners are designed to accommodate special cookware such as a griddle or a wok; other burners are bridge burners that are meant to keep food warm without continuing to cook it.

Another possibility is to have a dual-ring burner, or a burner that includes a stronger heat source wrapped around a weaker heat source. That way, on a single burner, you can choose to use just the smaller heat source for lower temperatures, but you can add the stronger heat source if you need higher temperatures.

What Oven Features Do I Need?

As for extra oven features, they can include everything from accessories like special oven racks or a temperature probe to special cooking features like the aforementioned convection settings, fast preheat (which expedites the preheating process), bread proofing (where the oven settings are customized to activate yeast and make bread rise), steam cooking (where you pour water into a reservoir and gently cook something with the resulting steam), air fry mode (where you can expeditiously fry frozen and fresh foods, similar to an air fryer) and many, many more options.

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Lily Hartman

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Lily Hartman is a staff writer at Reviewed. In her free time, she enjoys hiking the White Mountains, running at the beach, and strength training at the gym.

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